Aerospace Medical Dispositions
Item 26. Nose

The following lists the most common conditions of aeromedical significance, and course of action that should be taken by the examiner as defined by the protocol and disposition in the table. Medical certificates must not be issued to an applicant with medical conditions that require deferral, or for any condition not listed that may result in sudden or subtle incapacitation without consulting the AMCD or the RFS. Medical documentation must be submitted for any condition in order to support an issuance of an airman medical certificate.

Disease/Condition Class Evaluation Data Disposition
Evidence of severe allergic rhinitis All Submit all pertinent medical information and current status report Requires FAA Decision
Hay fever controlled by any of the following:
  • Desensitization 1
  • Nasal steroid spray
  • Nasal cromolyn sodium spray
All Submit all pertinent medical information and current status report If responds to treatment and without side effects - Issue

Otherwise - Requires FAA Decision
Obstruction of sinus ostia, including polyps, that would be likely to result in complete obstruction All Submit all pertinent medical information and current status report Requires FAA Decision

For hay fever requiring antihistamines:
  • The nonsedating antihistamines loratadine, desloratadine, and fexofenadine may be used while flying if, after an adequate initial "trial period," symptoms are controlled without adverse side effects.
  • Applicants with seasonal allergies requiring any other antihistamine (oral and/or nasal) may be certified by the examiner with the stipulation that they do not exercise the privileges of airman certificate until they have stopped the medication and wait after the last dose until:
    • At least five maximal dosing intervals have passed. For example, if the medication is taken every 4-6 hours, wait 30 hours (5x6) after the last dose to fly.
    • At least five times the maximum terminal elimination half-life has passed. For example, if the medication half-life is 6-8 hours, wait 40 hours (5x8) after the last dose to fly.
  • Examiners are encouraged to look up the dosing intervals and half-life.
  • Airmen who are exhibiting symptoms, regardless of the treatment used, must not fly.
  • In all situations, the examiner must notate the evaluation data in Block 60.

1 - AME must warn airman to not operate aircraft until four hours after injection.