U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
Air Traffic Organization Policy

ORDER
JO 7110.65V
Effective Date:
April 3, 2014
 
     
Subject:  Air Traffic Control
 

Briefing Guide - Change 2

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Paragraph
Number

Title

Page

2-1-10

NAVAID MALFUNCTIONS

BG­3

2-1-14

COORDINATE USE OF AIRSPACE

BG­4

2-7-2

ALTIMETER SETTING ISSUANCE BELOW

BG­5

2-9-3

CONTENT

BG­5

3-9-8

INTERSECTING RUNWAY SEPARATION

BG­6

3-9-9

NONINTERSECTING CONVERGNING RUNWAY

BG­6

4-8-1

APPROACH CLEARANCE

BG­11

5-4-5

TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

BG­13

5-4-6

RECEIVING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

BG­14

5-9-4

ARRIVAL INSTRUCTIONS

BG­15

7-5-3

SEPARATION

BG­17

7-9-4

SEPARATION

BG­19

8-1-9

RVSM OPERATIONS

BG­20

10-3-1

OVERDUE AIRCRAFT

BG­21

10-3-2

INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO ARTCC

BG­21

10-3-3

INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO RCC

BG­21

10-3-4

ALNOT

BG­21

10-3-6

Aircraft position plots

BG­21

10-3-7

ALNOT CANCELLATION

BG­21

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2­1­10. NAVAID MALFUNCTIONS

2. BACKGROUND: On July 31, 2013, revised approach clearance procedures, as specified in FAA Order JO 7110.65, 4­8­1, were disseminated to all Terminal and En Route ATC facilities. Those procedures did not include GPS Testing NOTAMs, changes to GPS anomaly reporting, or account for WAAS. This resulted in a necessary change to accompany paragraph 2­1­10.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2­1­10. NAVAID MALFUNCTIONS

 

2­1­10. NAVAID MALFUNCTIONS

Title through a5

 

No Change

b. When an aircraft reports a GPS anomaly, request the following information and/or take the following actions:

 

b. When an aircraft reports a GPS or WAAS anomaly, request the following information and/or take the following actions:

1. Record the following minimum information:

 

1. Record the following minimum information:

(a) Aircraft call sign and type.

 

(a) Aircraft make, model, and call sign.

(b) Location.

 

(b) Location or position, and altitude at the time where GPS or WAAS anomaly was observed.

(c) Altitude.

 

Delete

(d) Date/time of occurrence.

 

(c) Date/time of occurrence.

Add

 

2. Request a report from a second aircraft.

2. Record the incident on FAA Form 7230-4 or appropriate military form.

 

3. Record the incident on FAA Form 7230-4 or appropriate military form.

3. Broadcast the anomaly report to other aircraft as necessary.

 

4. Inform other aircraft of the anomaly as specified in paragraph 4­8­1j or k, as applicable.

PHRASEOLOGY-
ATTENTION ALL AIRCRAFT, GPS REPORTED UNRELIABLE IN VICINITY/AREA (position).

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
ATTENTION ALL AIRCRAFT, GPS REPORTED UNRELIABLE (OR WAAS UNAVAILABLE) IN VICINITY/AREA (position).

EXAMPLE-
“Attention all aircraft, GPS reported unreliable in the area 30 miles south of Waco VOR.”

 

EXAMPLE-
“Attention all aircraft, GPS reported unreliable (or WAAS unavailable) in the area 30 miles south of Waco VOR.”

c. When an aircraft reports a Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) anomaly, request the following information and/or take the following actions:

 

c. When a pilot reports a WAAS anomaly, determine from the pilot what indications he or she observes and record the information in accordance with sub­paragraph b above.

1. Determine if the pilot has lost all WAAS service.

 

Delete

PHRASEOLOGY-
ARE YOU RECEIVING ANY WAAS SERVICE?

 

Delete

2. If the pilot reports receipt of any WAAS service, acknowledge the report and continue normal operations.

 

Delete

3. If the pilot reports loss of all WAAS service, report as a GPS anomaly using procedures in subpara 2-1-10b.

 

Delete


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2­1­14. COORDINATE USE OF AIRSPACE

2. BACKGROUND: A Corrective Action Request (CAR) was issued in March 2010 identifying issues concerning confusion regarding responsibility for point out coordination. Conflicting language was identified between this paragraph and Paragraphs 5­4­5, Transferring Controller Handoff, and 5­4­6, Receiving Controller Handoff. This change, along with amendments to paragraphs 5­4­5 and 5­4­6, is intended to identify which controller(s) has coordination responsibility.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2­1­14. COORDINATE USE OF AIRSPACE

 

2­1­14. COORDINATE USE OF AIRSPACE

Title through a

 

No Change

b. Before you issue control instructions directly or relay through another source to an aircraft which is within another controller's area of jurisdiction that will change that aircraft's heading, route, speed, or altitude, ensure that coordination has been accomplished with each of the controllers listed below whose area of jurisdiction is affected by those instructions unless otherwise specified by a letter of agreement or a facility directive:

 

b. Before you issue a control instruction directly to a pilot that will change the aircraft’s heading, route, speed, or altitude, you must ensure that coordination has been completed with all controllers whose area of jurisdiction is affected by those instructions unless otherwise specified by a letter of agreement or facility directive. If your control instruction will be relayed to the pilot through a source other than another radar controller (FSS, ARINC, another pilot, etc.), you are still responsible to ensure that all required coordination is completed.

1. The controller within whose area of jurisdiction the control instructions will be issued.

 

Delete

2. The controller receiving the transfer of control.

 

Delete

3. Any intervening controller(s) through whose area of jurisdiction the aircraft will pass.

 

Delete

c. If you issue control instructions to an aircraft through a source other than another controller (e.g., ARINC, FSS, another pilot) ensure that the necessary coordination has been accomplished with any controllers listed in subparas b1, 2, and 3, whose area of jurisdiction is affected by those instructions unless otherwise specified by a letter of agreement or a facility directive.

 

 

Delete

Add

 

NOTE-
1. It is good operating practice for controllers to confirm that required coordination has been/will be effected, especially in unusual circumstances, such as recently modified sector configurations, airspace changes, route changes, etc.

2.
Ensuring that all required coordination has been completed does not necessarily imply that the controller issuing the control instruction directly to the pilot has to perform the coordination action.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2­7­2. ALTIMETER SETTING ISSUANCE BELOW LOWEST USABLE FL

2. BACKGROUND: An inquiry was received regarding the currency of CFR Exemption 2861A, Single Altimeter Setting for Frequent Transit of FL180, to 14 CFR 91.121, Altimeter Settings. Research validates that Exemption 2861A is still current and active. The exemption requires an LOA between the affected FAA ATC facilities and DOD that authorizes certain DOD aircraft the option of using a “single altimeter setting" while operating within restricted areas, MOAs, and ATC assigned airspace. This exemption originally referred to 14 CFR 91.81, Altimeter Settings, but now applies to 14 CFR 91.121, Altimeter Settings. There is no change in CFR language or ATC procedures with this DCP.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2­7­2. ALTIMETER SETTING ISSUANCE BELOW LOWEST USABLE FL

 

2­7­2. ALTIMETER SETTING ISSUANCE BELOW LOWEST USABLE FL

Title through e

 

No Change

f. Department of Defense (DOD) aircraft which operate on “single altimeter settings” (CFR Exemption 2861A) must be issued altimeter settings in accordance with standard procedures while the aircraft are en route to and from their restricted areas, MOAs, and ATC assigned airspace areas.

 

f. Department of Defense (DOD) aircraft that are authorized to operate in restricted areas, MOAs, and ATC assigned airspace areas on “single altimeter settings” (CFR Exemption 2861A), must be issued altimeter settings in accordance with standard procedures while the aircraft are en route to and from the restricted areas, MOAs, and ATC assigned airspace areas.

Add

 

NOTE-
The DOD is responsible for conducting all “single altimeter setting” operations within the boundaries of MOAs, restricted areas, and ATCAAs. Under an LOA, the DOD provides safe altitude clearance between DOD aircraft and other aircraft operating within, above, and below the MOAs, restricted areas, and ATCAAs with appropriate clearance of terrain.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7610.4, Appendix 20, Grant of Exemption No. 2861A ­ Single Altimeter Setting For Frequent Transit of FL180.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2­9­3. CONTENT

2. BACKGROUND: On September 5, 2013, the final report of the Performance­based Operations Aviation Rulemaking Committee (PARC)/Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) identified several issues pertaining to the operational use of flight path management systems. This change is an effort to address the safety issues identified in the report. These include: the increased risk of Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) when flying conventional non­precision approaches; pilot abilities and increased systems management; and the recommendation that ATC begin to transition away from conventional procedures constructed upon ground­based navigation aids to increased use of RNAV­based navigation.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2­9­3. CONTENT

 

2­9­3. CONTENT

Title through d EXAMPLE

 

No Change

e. Instrument/visual approach/s in use. Specify landing runway/s unless the runway is that to which the instrument approach is made.

 

e. Instrument/visual approach/es in use. Specify landing runway/s unless the runway is that to which the instrument approach is made. Before advertising non­precision approaches, priority should be given to available precision, then APV approaches.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
3­9­8. INTERSECTING RUNWAY SEPARATION, and
3­9­9. NONINTERSECTING CONVERGING RUNWAY OPERATIONS

2. BACKGROUND: A Corrective Action Request was developed identifying airports where aircraft operating on nonintersecting converging runways were passing through the airborne intersection on the extended centerline of the runway within 14 seconds of each other. Additionally, on July 1, 2013, the National Transportation Safety Board issued Safety Recommendation A­13­024 identifying the same issue. The ATO tasked Air Traffic Managers at those facilities that have nonintersecting converging runways where the extended centerline of a runway crosses a converging runway or the extended centerline of a converging runway within 1 NM of either departure end to convene/complete a safety risk management panel to review these operations. The changes were created by a workgroup at the direction of the Office of Safety and Technical Training (AJI). The changes were incorporated via a notice. The notice was implemented at LAS, CLT, JFK, IAD, IAH, ORD, and BOS beginning January 15, 2014. Secondly, the change was implemented at DFW, MSP, DEN, BWI, HNL, MEM, MIA, PHL, SLC, and TPA beginning April 2, 2014. Lastly, the change was implemented at all additional affected airports beginning July 9, 2014.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

3­9­8. INTERSECTING RUNWAY SEPARATION

 

3­9­8. INTERSECTING RUNWAY OPERATIONS

Title through a

 

No Change

b. Separate departing aircraft from an aircraft using an intersecting runway, or nonintersecting runways when the flight paths intersect, by ensuring that the departure does not begin takeoff roll until one of the following exists:

 

b. Separate departing aircraft from another aircraft using an intersecting runway by ensuring that the departure does not begin takeoff roll until one of the following exists:

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 2­1­21, Traffic Advisories.

 

No Change

1. The preceding aircraft has departed and passed the intersection, has crossed the departure runway, or is turning to avert any conflict.
(See FIG 3­9­5 and FIG 3­9­6).

 

1. The preceding aircraft has departed and passed the intersection or is turning to avert any conflict. (See FIG 3­9­5).

FIG 3­9­5
Intersecting Runway Separation

 

No Change

FIG 3­9­6
Intersecting Runway Separation

 

Delete

2. A preceding arriving aircraft is clear of the landing runway, completed the landing roll and will hold short of the intersection, passed the intersection, or has crossed over the departure runway. (See FIG 3­9­7 and FIG 3­9­8).

 

2. A preceding arriving aircraft is clear of the landing runway, completed the landing roll and will hold short of the intersection, or has passed the intersection. (See FIG 3­9­6).

REFERENCE-
P/CG Term – Clear of Runway

 

No Change

FIG 3­9­7
Intersecting Runway Separation

 

FIG 3­9­6
Intersecting Runway Separation

FIG 3-9-8

 

Delete

WAKE TURBULENCE APPLICATION through b3 note

 

No Change

(a) Crossing runways if projected flight paths will cross. (See FIG 3-9-9).

 

(a) Intersecting runways if projected flight paths will cross. (See FIG 3-9-7).

FIG 3-9-9
Crossing Runways

 

FIG 3­9­7
Intersecting Runways

(b) A parallel runway separated by 2,500 feet or more if projected flight paths will cross. (See FIG­3­9­10).

 

(b) A parallel runway separated by 2,500 feet or more if projected flight paths will cross. (See FIG­3­9­8).

FIG 3­9­10
Parallel Runway

 

FIG 3­9­8
Parallel Runway

4. Separate IFR/VFR aircraft departing behind a landing heavy jet/B757 on a crossing runway if the departure will fly through the airborne path of the arrival­ 2 minutes. (See FIG 3-9-11).

 

4. Separate IFR/VFR aircraft departing behind a landing heavy jet/B757 on an intersecting runway if the departure will fly through the airborne path of the arrival­ 2 minutes. (See FIG 3-9-9).

FIG 3­9­11
Departure on Crossing Runway

 

FIG 3­9­9
Departure on Intersecting Runway

OLD

 

NEW

Add

 

3­9­9. NONINTERSECTING CONVERGING RUNWAY OPERATIONS

Add

 

a. Separate departing aircraft from an aircraft using a nonintersecting runway when the flight paths intersect by ensuring that the departure does not begin takeoff roll until one of the following exists:

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 2-1-21, Traffic Advisories.

Add

 

1. The preceding aircraft has departed and crossed the departure runway, or is turning to avert any conflict. (See FIG 3-9-10).

Add

FIG 3­9­10
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor7

Add

 

2. A preceding arriving aircraft has completed the landing roll and will hold short of the projected intersection, passed the projected intersection, or has crossed over the departure runway (See FIG 3-9-11 and FIG 3­9­12).

Add

FIG 3­9­11
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor6

Add

FIG 3­9­12
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor5

Add

WAKE TURBULENCE APPLICATION

Add

 

b. Separate IFR/VFR aircraft taking off behind a heavy jet/B757 departure by 2 minutes when departing a crossing runway if projected flight paths will cross. (See FIG 3-9-13).

Add

FIG 3­9­13
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor4

Add

 

NOTE-
Takeoff clearance to the following aircraft should not be issued until 2 minutes after the heavy jet/B757 begins takeoff roll.

Add

 

c. Separate IFR/VFR aircraft departing behind a landing heavy jet/B757 on a crossing runway if the departure will fly through the airborne path of the arrival­ 2 minutes. (See FIG 3-9-14).

Add

FIG 3­9­14
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor3

Add

 

d. Air traffic controllers must not approve pilot requests to deviate from the required wake turbulence time interval if the preceding aircraft is a heavy jet/B757.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 5­8­3, Successive or Simultaneous Departures.
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para
5­8­5, Departures and Arrivals on Parallel or Nonintersecting Diverging Runways.

Add

 

e. If the extended centerline of a runway crosses a converging runway or the extended centerline of a converging runway within 1 NM of either departure end, apply the provisions of Paragraph 3­9­8, Intersecting Runway Separation. (See FIG 3­9­15).

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 10­3­14, Go­Around/Missed Approach.

Add

FIG 3­9­15
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor2

Add

FIG 3­9­16
Intersecting Runway Separation

BG CHG2_At Anchor1

Paragraph 3­9­9 and 3­9­10

 

Renumber to 3­9­10 and 3­9­11


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 4­8­1. APPROACH CLEARANCE

2. BACKGROUND: Since the implementation of the revised paragraph 4­8­1, industry stakeholders and the agency resolved concerns stemming from language incorporated into the original 4­8­1 change concerning Radius to Fix (RF) legs. These concerns have been resolved, and have resulted in some changes to AFS assumptions for conducting RNAV approaches with RF legs. This negates the need to retain the leg length procedures for RNP approaches with RF legs. Additionally, there have been changes coordinated between ATO and AFS concerning new GPS testing NOTAMs and GPS anomaly procedures to articulate a change in the structure of these NOTAMS from using “unreliable” to “may not be available.”

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

4­8­1. APPROACH CLEARANCE

 

4­8­1. APPROACH CLEARANCE

Title through c

 

No Change

d. For RNAV­equipped aircraft operating on unpublished routes, issue approach clearance for conventional or RNAV SIAP only after the aircraft is: (See FIG 4­8­2).

 

d. For RNAV­equipped aircraft operating on unpublished routes, issue approach clearance for conventional or RNAV SIAP including approaches with RF legs only after the aircraft is: (See FIG 4­8­2).

1. Established on a heading or course direct to the IAF at an intercept angle not greater than 90 degrees and is assigned an altitude in accordance with b2. Radar monitoring is required until the aircraft is established on a segment of the instrument approach procedure for RNAV (RNP) approaches when no procedure turn or hold­in­lieu of procedure turn will be executed.

 

1. Established on a heading or course direct to the IAF at an intercept angle not greater than 90 degrees and is assigned an altitude in accordance with b2. Radar monitoring is required to the IAF for RNAV (RNP) approaches when no hold­in­lieu of procedure turn is executed.

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1 can be cleared direct to CENTR. The intercept angle at that IAF is 90 degrees or less. The minimum altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR, section 91.177) along the flight path to the IAF is 3,000 feet. If a hold in lieu of procedure turn pattern is depicted at an IAF and a TAA is not defined, the aircraft must be instructed to conduct a straight­in approach if ATC does not want the pilot to execute a hold­in­lieu procedure turn. “Cleared direct CENTR, maintain at or above three thousand until CENTR, cleared straight­in RNAV Runway One Eight Approach.”

 

No Change

d2 through f1

 

No Change

2. On a heading or course direct to the IAF when a hold­in­lieu of procedure turn is published and the pilot will execute the procedure, or

 

2. In accordance with paragraph d.

3. On a heading or course direct to the IAF/IF, at intercept angles no greater than 90 degrees and the distance to the waypoint beginning the RF leg is 6NM or greater, or

 

3. Do not clear aircraft direct to any waypoint beginning or within an RF leg.

4. With radar monitoring, on a heading or course direct to any waypoint 3 miles or more from the waypoint that begins the RF leg, at an intercept angle no greater than 30 degrees. (See FIG 4­8­4.)

 

4. Do not assign fix/waypoint crossing speeds in excess of charted speed restrictions.

5. Do not clear aircraft direct to any waypoint beginning or within an RF leg.

 

Delete

NOTE 1 through Fig 4­8­4 NOTE 2

 

No Change

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1 can be cleared to SCOND because the distance to THIRD, where the RF leg begins is 3NM or greater and the intercept angle will be 30 degrees or less and is radar monitored.

Aircraft 2 can be cleared direct to FIRST because the intercept angle is 90 degrees or less and the distance from FIRST to THIRD is 6NM or greater.

 

Delete

g through FIG4­8­5

 

No Change

j. For GPS UNRELIABLE NOTAMs, inform pilots requesting a GPS or RNAV approach that GPS is unreliable and clear the aircraft for the approach. This advisory may be omitted if contained in the Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) broadcast.

 

j. When GPS TESTING NOTAMs are published and testing is actually occurring, inform pilots requesting or cleared for a RNAV approach that GPS may not be available and request intentions. Do not resume RNAV approach operations until certain that GPS interference is no longer a factor or such GPS testing exercise has ceased.

k. For pilot reported GPS anomalies, advise subsequent aircraft requesting a GPS or RNAV approach that GPS is unreliable and clear the aircraft for the approach. This advisory may be discontinued after 15 minutes if no subsequent reports are received.

 

k. During times when pilots report GPS anomalies, request the pilot's intentions and/or clear that aircraft for an alternative approach, if available and operational. Announce to other aircraft requesting an RNAV approach that GPS is reported unavailable and request intentions.

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 2­1­10, NAVAID Malfunctions
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 4­7­12, Airport Conditions

 

No Change

PHRASEOLOGY-
CLEARED (approach), GPS UNRELIABLE.

 

Delete

l. For Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) UNAVAILABLE NOTAMs, advise aircraft requesting a GPS or RNAV approach that WAAS is unavailable and clear the aircraft for the approach. This advisory may be omitted if contained in the ATIS broadcast.

 

l. When clearing an aircraft for an RNAV approach, and a GPS NOTAM is published (a WAAS NOTAM is not issued), both GPS and WAAS may become unavailable. Therefore, when a GPS anomaly is reported, request the pilot's intentions.

PHRASEOLOGY-
CLEARED (approach), WAAS UNAVAILABLE.

 

Delete

NOTE-
1. WAAS UNAVAILABLE NOTAMs indicate a failure of a WAAS system component. GPS/WAAS equipment reverts to GPS-only operation and satisfies the requirements for basic GPS equipment.
2. WAAS UNRELIABLE NOTAMs indicate predictive coverage, are published for pilot preflight planning, and do not require any controller action.

 

NOTE-
WAAS UNAVAILABLE NOTAMs are published to indicate a failure of a WAAS system component. Airborne GPS/WAAS equipment may revert to GPS-only operation which satisfies the requirements for basic RNAV (GPS) approaches to the airport of intended landing or filed alternate airport, if airborne equipment is approved for such operations.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5­4­5. TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

2. BACKGROUND: A Corrective Action Request (CAR) was issued in March 2010 identifying issues concerning confusion regarding responsibility for point out coordination. Conflicting language was identified between this paragraph and Paragraphs 2­1­14, Coordinate Use of Airspace, and 5­4­6, Receiving Controller Handoff. This change, along with amendments to paragraphs 2­1­14 and 5­4­6, is intended to identify which controller(s) has point out responsibility.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5­4­5. TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

 

5­4­5. TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

Title through c1

 

No Change

2. Necessary coordination has been accomplished with all controllers through whose area of jurisdiction the aircraft will pass prior to entering the receiving controller's area of jurisdiction, except when such coordination is the receiving controller's responsibility as stated in para 5­4­6, Receiving Controller Handoff, and unless otherwise specified by a LOA or a facility directive.

 

2. Coordination has been accomplished with all controllers through whose area of jurisdiction the aircraft will pass prior to entering the receiving controller's area of jurisdiction unless otherwise specified by a LOA or a facility directive.

c3 through j

 

No Change

k. Advise the receiving controller that radar monitoring is required when the aircraft is on a direct route initiated by ATC that exceeds usable NAVAID distances.

 

k. Advise the receiving controller if radar monitoring is required.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5­4­6. RECEIVING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

2. BACKGROUND: A Corrective Action Request (CAR) was issued in March 2010 identifying issues concerning confusion regarding responsibility for point out coordination. Conflicting language was identified between this paragraph and paragraphs 2­1­14, Coordinate Use of Airspace, and 5­4­5, Transferring Controller Handoff. Additionally, numerous interpretations have been issued intended to rectify this confusion. This change, along with amendments to paragraphs 2­1­14 and 5­4­5, is intended to clarify which controller(s) has point out responsibility.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5­4­6. RECEIVING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

 

5­4­6. RECEIVING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

Title through b

 

No Change

c. Comply with restrictions issued by the initiating controller unless otherwise coordinated.

 

c. Comply with restrictions issued by the transferring controller unless otherwise coordinated.

d. Before you issue control instructions directly to an aircraft that is within another controller's area of jurisdiction that will change that aircraft's heading, route, speed, altitude, or beacon code, ensure that coordination has been accomplished with each of the controllers listed below whose area of jurisdiction is affected by those instructions unless otherwise specified by a LOA or a facility directive:

 

Delete

NOTE-
Those en route facilities using host software that provides capability for passing interim altitude must include the specific operations and procedures for use of this procedure in a LOA between the appropriate facilities.

 

Delete

1. The controller within whose area of jurisdiction the control instructions will be issued.

 

Delete

2. Any intervening controller(s) through whose area of jurisdiction the aircraft will pass.

 

Delete

e through i NOTE

 

Re-letter d through h NOTE

i. If you decide, after accepting the transfer of radar identification, to delay the aircraft's climb or descent through the vertical limits of the transferring controller's area of jurisdiction, advise the transferring controller of that decision as soon as possible. You now have the responsibility to ensure that the necessary coordination is accomplished with any intervening controller(s) whose area of jurisdiction is affected by that delay, unless otherwise specified in a LOA or a facility directive.

 

h. If you decide, after accepting the transfer of radar identification, to delay the aircraft's climb or descent through the vertical limits of the transferring controller's area of jurisdiction, advise the transferring controller of that decision as soon as possible.

NOTE-
Those en route facilities using HOST software that provides capability for passing interim altitude must include the specific operations and procedures for use of this procedure in a LOA between the appropriate facilities.

 

No Change


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5­9­4. ARRIVAL INSTRUCTIONS

2. BACKGROUND: In the interest of providing commonality with the guidance contained in paragraph 4­8­1 concerning straight in approach clearances, we are revising a figure and examples within paragraph 5­9­4e related to Terminal Arrival Areas (TAA).

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5­9­4. ARRIVAL INSTRUCTIONS

 

5­9­4. ARRIVAL INSTRUCTIONS

EXAMPLE-
1. Aircraft 1: The aircraft is in the straight in area of
the TAA. “Seven miles from CENTR, Cleared R−NAV Runway One Eight Approach.”
2. Aircraft 2: The aircraft is in the left base area of the TAA. “One five miles from LEFTT, Cleared GPS Runway One Eight Approach.”
3. Aircraft 3: The aircraft is in the right base area of the
TAA. “Four miles from WRITE, Cleared FMS Runway One Eight Approach.”

 

EXAMPLE-
1. Aircraft 1: The aircraft is in the straight in area of
the TAA. “Seven miles from CENTR, Cleared R−NAV
Runway One Eight Approach.”
2. Aircraft 2: The aircraft is in the left base area of the TAA. “One five miles from LEFTT, Cleared R­NAV Runway One Eight Approach.”
3. Aircraft 3: The aircraft is in the right base area of the
TAA. “Four miles from RIGHT, Cleared R­NAV Runway One Eight Approach.”

OLD

FIG 5−9−6
Basic “T” Design

BG CHG2_floating5

NEW

FIG 5−9−6
Basic “T” Design

BG CHG2_At Anchor0


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 7­5­3. SEPARATION

2. BACKGROUND: On March 6, 2014, a workgroup convened to provide consensus and recommendations to clearly define and modify FAA JO 7110.65 requirements as they relate to SVFR operations in the NAS. The workgroup consisted of Air Traffic Services, Mission Support, Safety and Technical Training, Flight Standards, NATCA, and SUPCOM. The workgroup concluded that although paragraph 7­5­3 described the SVFR separation standards between fixed­wing aircraft, and Alternate SVFR minima for helicopters, it did not adequately address the separation minima to be used for SVFR helicopters. The changes to this paragraph do not provide use of pilot applied visual separation at airports without an operational control tower or alter the provisions of Paragraph 7­5­5, Local Operations.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

7­5­3. SEPARATION

 

7­5­3. SEPARATION

a. Apply approved separation between:

 

a. Apply non­radar or visual separation between:

1. SVFR aircraft.

 

1. SVFR fixed-wing aircraft.

2. SVFR aircraft and IFR aircraft.

 

2. SVFR fixed­wing aircraft and SVFR Helicopters.

Add

 

3. SVFR fixed­wing aircraft and IFR aircraft.

NOTE-
Approved separation between SVFR fixed−wing aircraft, and between SVFR fixed−wing aircraft and IFR fixed−wing aircraft, is prescribed in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7, para 7−5−4, Altitude Assignment. Radar vectors are authorized as prescribed in para 5−6−1, Application, subpara f.

 

NOTE-
1. Vertical separation is authorized between SVFR fixed-wing aircraft and IFR aircraft as prescribed in FAA JO 7110.65, Paragraph 7­5­4, Altitude Assignments

2.
Due to the requirements for SVFR fixed­wing aircraft to maintain 1­mile flight visibility and to remain clear of clouds, radar separation is not authorized during SVFR fixed­wing operations. Radar vectors are authorized, as prescribed in para 5­6­1, Application, subparagraph f, to expedite the entrance, exit, and transition of SVFR fixed­wing aircraft through the appropriate surface area.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Chapter 6, Nonradar
FAAO JO 7110.65, para 7­2­1, Visual Separation
FAAO JO 7110.65, para 7­5­4, Altitude Assignment

Add

 

b. Apply non­radar, visual, or IFR radar separation between:

Add

 

1. SVFR Helicopters.

Add

 

2. SVFR Helicopters and IFR aircraft.

Add

 

NOTE-
1. Vertical separation is authorized between SVFR helicopters and IFR aircraft as prescribed in FAA JO 7110.65, Paragraph 7­5­4, Altitude Assignments.

2.
Radar separation as prescribed in Chapter 5 may be applied provided that the facility conducting the operation is authorized to provide radar separation services in accordance with FAAO 7210.3, Paragraph 10­5­3, Functional Use of Certified Tower Radar Displays, subparagraph b5, and subparagraph d. Facilities that are not delegated airspace or separation responsibility must use CTRDs in accordance with FAAO 7110.65, Paragraph 3­1­9, Use of Tower Radar Displays, subparagraph b.

b. Alternate SVFR helicopter separation minima may be established when warranted by the volume and/or complexity of local helicopter operations. Alternate SVFR helicopter separation minima must be established with an LOA with the helicopter operator which must specify, as a minimum, that SVFR helicopters are to maintain visual reference to the surface and adhere to the following aircraft separation minima:

 

c. Alternate SVFR helicopter separation minima may be established when warranted by the volume and/or complexity of local helicopter operations. Alternate SVFR helicopter separation minima must be established with an LOA with the helicopter operator which must specify, as a minimum, that SVFR helicopters are to maintain visual reference to the surface and adhere to the following aircraft separation minima:

1. Between a SVFR helicopter and an arriving or departing IFR aircraft:

 

No Change

(a) 1/2 mile. If the IFR aircraft is less than 1 mile from the landing airport.

 

No Change

(b) 1 mile. If the IFR aircraft is 1 mile or more from the airport.

 

No Change

2. 1 mile between SVFR helicopters. This separation may be reduced to 200 feet if:

 

No Change

(a) Both helicopters are departing simultaneously on courses that diverge by at least 30 degrees and:

 

No Change

(1) The tower can determine this separation by reference to surface markings; or

 

No Change

(2) One of the departing helicopters is instructed to remain at least 200 feet from the other.

 

No Change

NOTE-
Radar vectors are authorized as prescribed in para 5­6­1, Application.

 

NOTE-
1. Vertical separation is authorized between SVFR helicopters and IFR aircraft as prescribed in FAAO 7110.65, paragraph 7­5­4, Altitude Assignments.

2.
Radar separation as prescribed in Chapter 5 may be applied provided that the facility conducting the operation is authorized to provide radar separation services in accordance with FAAO 7210.3, Paragraph 10­5­3, Functional Use of Certified Tower radar Displays, subparagraph b5, and subparagraph d. Facilities that are not delegated airspace or separation responsibility must use CTRDs in accordance with FAAO 7110.65, Paragraph 3­1­9, Use of Tower Radar Displays, subparagraph b.

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 2­1­4, Operational Priority.

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 2­1­4, Operational Priority.
FAAO JO 7110.65, para 7­2­1, Visual Separation
FAAO JO 7110.65, para 7­5­4 Altitude Separation
FAAO JO 7110.65, Chapter 6, Nonradar
FAAO JO 7210.3, para 10­5­3, Functional Use of Certified Tower Radar Displays


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 7­9­4. SEPARATION

2. BACKGROUND: The term “fixed-wing” was inadvertently added to subparagraph b.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

7­9­4. SEPARATION

 

7­9­4. SEPARATION

b. VFR fixed wing aircraft must be separated from VFR/IFR aircraft/ helicopter/rotorcraft that weigh more than 19,000 pounds and turbojets by no less than:

 

b. VFR aircraft must be separated from VFR/IFR aircraft/ helicopter/rotorcraft that weigh more than 19,000 pounds and turbojets by no less than:


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 8­1­9. RVSM OPERATIONS

2. BACKGROUND: FAA JO 7110.65, Paragraph 2­1­28, RVSM Operations, allows for operation of certain excepted non­RVSM aircraft within RVSM airspace. Due to the duration of flight and distance between appropriate landing facilities, provisions have been made to allow for additional exceptions within the oceanic and offshore environment. In addition to those exceptions in paragraph 2­1­28, the following non­RVSM aircraft may operate within RVSM airspace while operating within or transitioning to/from oceanic airspace: an aircraft being initially delivered to the State of Registry or Operator; an aircraft that was formerly RVSM-approved but has experienced an equipment failure and is being flown to a maintenance facility for repair in order to meet RVSM requirements and/or obtain approval; an aircraft being utilized for mercy or humanitarian purposes; within the Oakland, Anchorage, and Arctic FIRs, an aircraft transporting a spare engine mounted under the wing.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

Add

 

8­1­9. RVSM OPERATIONS

Add

 

Controller responsibilities for non-RVSM aircraft operating in RVSM airspace must include but not be limited to the following:

Add

 

a. Ensure non-RVSM aircraft are not permitted in RVSM airspace unless they meet the criteria of excepted aircraft and are previously approved by the operations supervisor/CIC.

Add

 

b. In addition to those aircraft listed in Chapter 2, Section 1, Paragraph 2­1­28, RVSM Operations, in this order, the following aircraft operating within oceanic airspace or transiting to/from oceanic airspace are excepted:

Add

 

1. Aircraft being initially delivered to the State of Registry or Operator;

Add

 

2. Aircraft that was formerly RVSM approved but has experienced an equipment failure and is being flown to a maintenance facility for repair in order to meet RVSM requirements and/or obtain approval;

Add

 

3. Aircraft being utilized for mercy or humanitarian purposes;

Add

 

4. Within the Oakland, Anchorage, and Arctic FIRs, an aircraft transporting a spare engine mounted under the wing.

Add

 

(a) These exceptions are accommodated on a workload or traffic­permitting basis.

Add

 

(b) All other requirements contained in paragraph 2­1­28 are applicable to this section.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 2­1­28, RVSM Operations


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
10­3­1. OVERDUE AIRCRAFT
10­3­2. INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO ARTCC
10­3­3. INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO RCC
10­3­4. ALNOT
10­3­6. AIRCRAFT POSITION PLOTS
10­3­7. ALNOT CANCELLATION

2. BACKGROUND: To clarify that facilities must make required notifications to initiate Search and Rescue (SAR) operations as soon as possible, new guidance is provided directing ATC facilities to take immediate action to issue an Alert Notice (ALNOT) after a simultaneous loss of radar and communications under abnormal circumstances. There has been some confusion that facilities must wait 30 minutes prior to issuing an ALNOT; however, those circumstances would be related to a pilot's failure to cancel a flight plan, failure to report airborne after a clearance void time, etc. A simultaneous loss of radar and communications under abnormal circumstances with an en route IFR aircraft or a VFR aircraft receiving flight following services should be considered an emergency situation to be followed by an immediate ALNOT. Timely actions are needed in these circumstances to support the best possible outcome in the event of a survivable crash. In addition to the filing of a timely ALNOT, essential follow­up information to be included in an ALNOT and that information to be passed to the appropriate United States Coast Guard or United States Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) is clarified to aid the SAR providers in the SAR mission.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

10­3­1. OVERDUE AIRCRAFT

 

10­3­1 OVERDUE AIRCRAFT/OTHER SITUATIONS

a. Consider an aircraft to be overdue, initiate the procedures stated in this section and issue an ALNOT when neither communications nor radar contact can be established and 30 minutes have passed since:

 

a. Consider an aircraft to be overdue and initiate the procedures stated in this section to issue an ALNOT when neither communications nor radar contact can be established and 30 minutes have passed since:

NOTE through a2

 

No Change

Add

 

3. A VFR or IFR aircraft arriving at an airport not served by an air traffic control tower or flight service station fails to cancel a flight plan after receiving instructions on how to cancel.

Add

 

NOTE-
If you have reason to believe that an aircraft is overdue prior to 30 minutes, take the appropriate action immediately.

Add

 

b. Consider an aircraft to be in an emergency status and initiate ALNOT procedures in this section immediately when there is an abnormal simultaneous loss of radar and communications with an IFR aircraft or VFR/SVFR aircraft receiving flight following services. This situation may be applicable to an aircraft operating in a non­radar environment and an unexpected/ abnormal loss of communications occurs.

Add

 

c. The ARTCC in whose area the aircraft is reported as overdue, missing, or lost will make these determinations and takes any subsequent action required.

b and c

 

Re-letter d and e.

OLD

 

NEW

10­3­2. INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO ARTCC

 

10­3­2. INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO ARTCC

TERMINAL

 

TERMINAL

When an aircraft is considered to be in emergency status that may require SAR procedures, or an IFR aircraft is overdue, the terminal facility must alert the ARTCC and forward the following information, as available:

 

When an aircraft is considered to be in emergency status that may require SAR procedures, or an IFR aircraft is overdue, the terminal facility must alert the appropriate ARTCC and forward the following information, as available:

a through c

 

No Change

d. Action taken by reporting facility and proposed action.

 

d. Aircraft beacon code.

e through g

 

No Change

h. Last known position, estimated present position, and maximum range of flight of the aircraft based on remaining fuel and airspeed.

 

h. Last known position, how determined, time, estimated present position, and maximum range of flight of the aircraft based on remaining fuel and airspeed.

OLD

 

NEW

10­3­3. INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO RCC

 

10­3­3. INFORMATION TO BE FORWARDED TO RCC

Title through d

 

No Change

Add

 

e. Aircraft beacon code.

e through h

 

Re-letter f through i.

i. Last known position, estimated present position, and maximum range of flight of the aircraft based on remaining fuel and airspeed.

 

j. Last known position, how determined, time, estimated present position, and maximum range of flight of the aircraft based on remaining fuel and airspeed.

j through l

 

Re-letter k through m.

OLD

 

NEW

10­3­4. ALNOT

 

10­3­4. ALNOT

Title through b

 

No Change

Add

 

c. Include pertinent information in the ALNOT that will aid the RCC and SAR teams in conducting the SAR mission. When known, include:

Add

 

1. Last known position.

Add

 

2. Time.

Add

 

3. Aircraft beacon code.

Add

 

d. When information is obtained not previously contained in the ALNOT, issue an amended ALNOT to update information that will assist the SAR providers.

OLD

 

NEW

10­3­6. AIRCRAFT POSITION PLOTS

 

10­3­6. LAST KNOWN POSITION DETERMINATION

Plot the flight path of the aircraft on a chart, including position reports, predicted positions, possible range of flight, and any other pertinent information. Solicit the assistance of other aircraft known to be operating near the aircraft in distress. Forward this information to the RCC or the ARTCC as appropriate.

 

Delete

Add

 

a. To assist the RCC and SAR teams in the conduct of the SAR mission, provide the most accurate latitude and longitude available to the FAA using en route and terminal radar sensor data near the aircraft's last known position.

Add

 

b. If necessary to prevent an undue delay, utilize any available method to determine the initial latitude and longitude. Follow­up as soon as possible with a formal latitude and longitude using the appropriate terminal or en route facility data extraction tools.

Add

 

c. If available, solicit the assistance of other aircraft known to be operating near the aircraft in distress.

Add

 

d. Forward this information to the RCC or the ARTCC as appropriate.

OLD

 

NEW

10­3­7. ALNOT CANCELLATION

 

10­3­7. ALNOT CANCELLATION

EN ROUTE

 

EN ROUTE

Cancel the ALNOT when the aircraft is located or the search is abandoned

 

a. When directed by the RCC, cancel the ALNOT when the aircraft is located or the search is abandoned.

Add

 

b. Include pertinent information in the cancellation that will aid the RCC, SAR teams, and FAA SAR management to include the location where the aircraft or wreckage was found.


 

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