U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
Air Traffic Organization Policy

ORDER
JO 7110.65
U
Effective Date:
February 9, 2012
 
     
Subject:  Air Traffic Control
     Includes:  Change 1 effective 7/26/12, Errata to Change 1 effective 7/26/12,
    Change 2 effective 3/7/13, and Errata to Change 2 effective 3/7/13.
    Change 3 effective 8/22/13.
 

Briefing Guide

Change 2

Effective:  3/7/2013

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2-1-6. SAFETY ALERT

2. BACKGROUND: Phraseology for issuing a low altitude alert includes providing the applicable altitude based on either the aircraft's location and/or activity. RNAV instrument approaches such as LPV DA, LNAV/VNAV DA, and LNAV MDA, all indicate different altitudes for their respective Decision Altitude (DA), Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA), or Decision Height (DH) based on several factors (for example, approach category, inoperative equipment (aircraft or ground), crew qualifications, and company authorization). These are all examples of issues that may either limit or change the height of a published MDA, DA or DH. Controllers may not be aware of these restrictions and are only required to clear an aircraft for the type of approach that is listed on the approach plate (for example, “(Callsign) Cleared RNAV Runway 35C approach"). Therefore, providing the correct DA, MDA, or DH to the pilot quickly and accurately is largely precluded.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2­1­6. SAFETY ALERT

 

2­1­6. SAFETY ALERT

Issue a safety alert to an aircraft if you are aware the aircraft is in a position/altitude which, in your judgment, places it in unsafe proximity to terrain, obstructions, or other aircraft. Once the pilot informs you action is being taken to resolve the situation, you may discontinue the issuance of further alerts. Do not assume that because someone else has responsibility for the aircraft that the unsafe situation has been observed and the safety alert issued; inform the appropriate controller.

 

Issue a safety alert to an aircraft if you are aware the aircraft is in a position/altitude that, in your judgment, places it in unsafe proximity to terrain, obstructions, or other aircraft. Once the pilot informs you action is being taken to resolve the situation, you may discontinue the issuance of further alerts. Do not assume that because someone else has responsibility for the aircraft that the unsafe situation has been observed and the safety alert issued; inform the appropriate controller.

NOTE

 

No Change

a. Terrain/Obstruction Alert. Immediately issue/initiate an alert to an aircraft if you are aware the aircraft is at an altitude which, in your judgment, places it in unsafe proximity to terrain/obstructions. Issue the alert as follows:

 

a. Terrain/Obstruction Alert. Immediately issue/initiate an alert to an aircraft if you are aware the aircraft is at an altitude that, in your judgment, places it in unsafe proximity to terrain and/or obstructions. Issue the alert as follows:

PHRASEOLOGY-
LOW ALTITUDE ALERT (call sign),
CHECK YOUR ALTITUDE IMMEDIATELY.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
LOW ALTITUDE ALERT (call sign),
CHECK YOUR ALTITUDE IMMEDIATELY.

Add

 

and, if the aircraft is not yet on final approach,

THE (as appropriate) MEA/MVA/MOCA/MIA IN YOUR AREA IS (altitude),

 

THE (as appropriate) MEA/MVA/MOCA/MIA IN YOUR AREA IS (altitude),

or if an aircraft is past the final approach fix (non­precision approach),

 

Delete

or the outer marker,

 

Delete

or the fix used in lieu of the outer marker (precision approach),

 

Delete

and, if known, issue

 

Delete

THE (as appropriate) MDA/DH IS (altitude).

 

Delete

Add

 

REFERENCE-
P/CG Term – Final Approach ­ IFR

b. Aircraft Conflict/Mode C Intruder Alert. Immediately issue/initiate an alert to an aircraft if you are aware of another aircraft at an altitude which you believe places them in unsafe proximity. If feasible, offer the pilot an alternate course of action.

 

b. Aircraft Conflict/Mode C Intruder Alert. Immediately issue/initiate an alert to an aircraft if you are aware of another aircraft at an altitude which you believe places them in unsafe proximity. If feasible, offer the pilot an alternate course of action. When an alternate course of action is given, end the transmission with the word “immediately."

c. When an alternate course of action is given, end the transmission with the word “immediately."

 

Delete

PHRASEOLOGY-

 

No Change

Add

 

EXAMPLE-
“Traffic Alert, Cessna Three Four Juliet, advise you turn left immediately.”

Add

 

or

Add

 

“Traffic Alert, Cessna Three­Four Juliet, advise you turn left and climb immediately.”


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2-1-30. “BLUE LIGHTNING” EVENTS

2. BACKGROUND: Human smuggling is a global problem that is growing in frequency and scope. The criminal organizations behind the major smuggling rings have often utilized commercial air transportation to move their victims from country to country, or from continent to continent. The Secretaries of the Department of Transportation and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have committed their departments (including the FAA) to provide a process intended to allow aircrews to notify the appropriate law enforcement agency about a possible human smuggling event on an air carrier flight inbound to the United States. Passing the information on ATC frequencies would only occur if the primary means (through company channels) of notification have failed.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

Add

 

2­1­30. “BLUE LIGHTNING” EVENTS

Add

 

Ensure that the supervisor/controller­in­charge (CIC) is notified of reports of possible human trafficking. These may be referred to as “Blue Lightning” events.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 4-5-6. MINIMUM EN ROUTE ALTITUDES

2. BACKGROUND: Since 2002, Global Positioning Systems/Wide Area Augmentation System (GPS/WAAS) Minimum En Route Altitudes (MEA) have been certified on some low altitude Air Traffic Service (ATS) routes, mostly in Alaska. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) equipped aircraft are equipped with GPS or WAAS, with en route and terminal capability. The GNSS MEA allows appropriately­equipped GNSS aircraft to fly at altitudes lower than conventional MEAs when there are restrictions due to NAVAID coverage. When established on Victor airways, the GNSS MEA provides an advantage to pilots by allowing flight below potential adverse weather conditions (i.e., icing conditions or other) where conventional MEAs may be restricted due to NAVAID coverage. The GNSS MEA on a Victor airway provides air traffic control an advantage by making additional cardinal altitudes available on the airway. GNSS MEAs are also published on low altitude Tango or “T" routes, high altitude Q routes as well as jet routes. No guidance was previously published regarding GNSS MEAs. For the purpose of this change, all previously designated routes are termed ATS routes as defined in the Pilot/Controller Glossary. The GNSS MEA is for use in the 48 contiguous states only, Alaska requirements remain unchanged.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

4­5­6. MINIMUM EN ROUTE ALTITUDES

 

4­5­6. MINIMUM EN ROUTE ALTITUDES

Title thru c

 

No Change

Add

 

d. GNSS MEAs may be approved on published ATS routes. Air traffic may assign GNSS MEAs to GNSS­equipped aircraft where established.

Add

 

NOTE–
On high altitude ATS routes, the GNSS MEA is FL180 unless published higher.

d

 

Re­letter e


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5-2-17. VALIDATION OF MODE C READOUT

2. BACKGROUND: The Pilot Controller Glossary (PCG) correctly defines the term "verify" to mean "Request confirmation of information." The PCG also correctly leaves out the term "confirm." Throughout the order, the term "verify" is correctly used in examples of phraseology when the intent of the phraseology is to "confirm" information. This change identifies an instances where the term is not used.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5­2­17. VALIDATION OF MODE C READOUT

 

5­2­17. VALIDATION OF MODE C READOUT

Title through d

 

No Change

1.Confirm that the pilot is using 29.92 inches of mercury as the altimeter setting and has accurately reported the altitude.

 

1.Verify that the pilot is using 29.92 inches of mercury as the altimeter setting and has accurately reported the altitude.

PHRASEOLOGY-
CONFIRM USING TWO NINER NINER TWO AS YOUR ALTIMETER SETTING.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
VERIFY USING TWO NINER NINER TWO AS YOUR ALTIMETER SETTING.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5-5-4. Minima

2. BACKGROUND: At the request of Terminal Operations, Headquarters, FAA Flight Systems Laboratory conducted an analytical study to re­examine the separation standards that are applicable to terminal use of the ASR­11. This study addressed several paragraphs in FAA Order JO 7110.65, Chapter 5, Section 5, Radar Separation, including target separation, target resolution, vertical application, rules on the use of passing and diverging, the minimum separation from obstructions, minimum separation from adjacent airspace, and, if applicable, edge­of­scope separation. The performance of the ASR­11 with MSSR was compared against the performance of similar systems, specifically ASR­9 with Mode S, that are currently allowed to be used for these operations. The study concluded that performance of the ASR­11 (MSSR) is equivalent to the performance of an ASR­9 with Mode S. Therefore, allowing the use of the terminal separation standard minima of 3 NM for properly performing transponder­equipped aircraft at ranges from the radar of up to 60 NM from the sensor antenna should incur no greater risk or hazard than the current separation standard minima. There are currently 68 ASR­11 radar systems installed in the National Airspace System (NAS). Increasing the usability of the existing installed infrastructure provided by the ASR­11 will increase the efficiency of the NAS, with no impact on overall safety.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5­5­4. MINIMA

 

5­5­4. MINIMA

Title thru a3

 

No Change

Add

 

4. For single sensor ASR­11 MSSR Beacon, when less than 60 miles from the antenna– 3 miles.

NOTE−
Wake turbulence procedures specify increased separation minima required for certain classes of aircraft because of the possible effects of wake turbulence.

 

NOTE−
Wake turbulence procedures specify increased separation minima required for certain classes of aircraft because of the possible effects of wake turbulence.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5-8-2. initial heading

2. BACKGROUND: The Air Traffic Control Procedures and Phraseology Action Team (ATCPP) is a working group under the Performance Based Operations Aviation Rulemaking Committee (PARC) established to address RNAV and required navigation performance implementation issues and propose action to the FAA. The ATCPP is composed of air traffic, aviation industry, and human factors subject matter experts. The ATCPP reviews, assesses, and proposes changes to ATC procedures and phraseology and is tasked with incorporating those changes into FAA Order JO 7110.65, the AIM, and AIP.

Extensive evaluation of RNAV SIDs that begin at the runway has established that aircraft have occasionally flown an unexpected flight path on departure due to loading of an incorrect procedure in the Flight Management System (FMS). Pilots enter the departure procedure and route of flight received in the ATC clearance prior to departure from the gate area. RNAV SIDs are recalled from a database for entry into the FMS. Runway specific RNAV SIDs may be programmed into the FMS based on the anticipated departure runway. Human error may result in an incorrect procedure being recalled from the database, or the runway assignment on taxi may not be coincident with the RNAV SID or transition. However, human factors studies have established that there is greater potential for an incorrect procedure to be entered in the FMS when a change in the procedure entered in the FMS is required after departure from the gate. Extensive evaluation of procedure implementations and field testing of various runway verification phraseology has established that an ATC advisory to pilots prior to departure can assist aircrew in ensuring the correct departure procedure is entered in the FMS. The phraseology in this change has been demonstrated successfully at Dallas/Fort Worth International, Charlotte/Douglas International, and Hartsfield­Jackson Atlanta International airports.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5­8­2. INITIAL HEADING

 

5­8­2. INITIAL HEADING

Before departure, assign the initial heading to be flown if a departing aircraft is to be vectored immediately after takeoff.

 

a. Before departure, assign the initial heading to be flown if a departing aircraft is to be vectored immediately after takeoff.

Phraseology thru Reference

 

No Change

Add

 

b. When conducting simultaneous parallel runway departures utilizing RNAV SIDs, advise aircraft of the initial fix/waypoint on the RNAV route.

Add

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
RNAV to (fix/waypoint), RUNWAY (number), CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF.

Add

 

EXAMPLE-
“RNAV to MPASS, Runway Two­Six Left, cleared for takeoff.”

Add

 

NOTE­
1. TERMINAL. A purpose for an initial waypoint advisory is not necessary since pilots associate this advisory with the flight path to their planned route of flight. Pilots must immediately advise ATC if a different RNAV SID is entered in the aircraft FMS.

Add

 

2. The SID transition is not restated as it is contained in the ATC clearance.

Add

 

3. Aircraft cleared via RNAV SIDs designed to begin with a vector to the initial waypoint are assigned a heading before departure.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 3­9­9, Takeoff Clearance
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 4­3­2, Departure Clearances
AIM, Para 5-2-7. Departure Control


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 7­2­1. VISUAL SEPARATION

2. BACKGROUND: Current air traffic procedures specify that visual separation may be applied between aircraft under the control of the same facility within the terminal area. With the advent of consolidated air traffic control facilities, this restriction has limited the ability to apply the procedure as the radar facility is no longer “the same facility” even though there have been minor or no changes to the airspace or operation. Additionally, controllers are required to advise the pilot if aircraft are on converging courses during the initial traffic description, along with the direction of the other aircraft.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

7­2­1. VISUAL SEPARATION

 

7­2­1. VISUAL SEPARATION

Title thru REFERENCE

 

No Change

a. TERMINAL. Visual separation may be applied between aircraft under the control of the same facility within the terminal area up to but not including FL180 provided:

 

a. TERMINAL. Visual separation may be applied between aircraft up to but not including FL180 under the following conditions:

Add

 

1. Tower­applied visual separation.

1. Communication is maintained with at least one of the aircraft involved or the capability to communicate immediately as prescribed in para 3­9­3, Departure Control Instructions, subpara a2 is available, and:

 

(a) Maintain communication with at least one of the aircraft involved or ensure there is an ability to communicate immediately as prescribed in paragraph 3­9­3, Departure Control Instructions, subparagraph a2.

2. The aircraft are visually observed by the tower and visual separation is maintained between the aircraft by the tower. The tower must not provide visual separation between aircraft when wake turbulence separation is required or when the lead aircraft is a B757.

 

(b) The tower visually observes the aircraft, issues timely traffic advisories, and maintains visual separation between the aircraft. The use of tower­applied visual separation is not authorized when wake turbulence separation is required.

Add

 

(c) Issue subsequent control instructions as necessary to ensure continued separation between the applicable aircraft.

Add

 

NOTE–
Adjacent airports with operating ATCTs are not authorized to apply visual separation between their traffic and the other ATCT's traffic.

Add

 

2. Pilot­applied visual separation.

Add

 

(a) Maintain communication with at least one of the aircraft involved and ensure there is an ability to communicate with the other aircraft.

3. A pilot sees another aircraft and is instructed to maintain visual separation from the aircraft as follows:

 

(b) The pilot sees another aircraft and is instructed to maintain visual separation from the aircraft as follows:

(a) Tell the pilot about the other aircraft including position, direction and, unless it is obvious, the other aircraft's intention.

 

(1) Tell the pilot about the other aircraft. Include position, direction, and, unless it is obvious, the other aircraft's intention.

(b) Obtain acknowledgment from the pilot that the other aircraft is in sight.

 

(2) Obtain acknowledgment from the pilot that the other aircraft is in sight.

(c) Instruct the pilot to maintain visual separation from that aircraft.

 

(3) Instruct the pilot to maintain visual separation from that aircraft.

(d) Advise the pilot if the radar targets appear likely to converge.

 

Delete

Add

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
TRAFFIC, (clock position and distance), (direction) BOUND, (type of aircraft), (intentions and other relevant information).

Add

 

DO YOU HAVE IT IN SIGHT?

Add

 

If the answer is in the affirmative,

Add

 

MAINTAIN VISUAL SEPARATION.

NOTE
Issue this advisory in conjunction with the instruction to maintain visual separation, or thereafter if the controller subsequently becomes aware that the targets are merging.

 

Delete

(e) If the aircraft are on converging courses, inform the other aircraft of the traffic and that visual separation is being applied.

 

Delete

(f) If the pilot advises he/she has the traffic in sight and will maintain visual separation from it (the pilot must use that entire phrase), the controller need only “approve” the operation instead of restating the instructions.

 

(c) If the pilot advises he/she has the traffic in sight and will maintain visual separation from it (the pilot must use that entire phrase), the controller need only “approve” the operation instead of restating the instructions.

PHRASEOLOGY-
TRAFFIC, (clock position and distance), (direction) BOUND, (type of aircraft), (intentions and other relevant information).

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
Delete

If applicable,

 

Delete

ON CONVERGING COURSE.

 

Delete

DO YOU HAVE IT IN SIGHT?

 

Delete

If the answer is in the affirmative,

 

Delete

MAINTAIN VISUAL SEPARATION.

 

Delete

If the pilot advises he/she has the traffic in sight and will maintain visual separation from it (pilot must use that entire phrase):

 

Delete

APPROVED

 

APPROVED

Add

 

NOTE­
Pilot­applied visual separation between aircraft is achieved when the controller has instructed the pilot to maintain visual separation and the pilot acknowledges or when the controller has approved pilot­initiated visual separation.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 5­4­5, Transferring Controller Handoff

If aircraft are on converging courses, advise the other aircraft:

 

(d) If the aircraft are on converging courses, inform the other aircraft of the traffic and that visual separation is being applied.

TRAFFIC, (clock position and distance), (direction) BOUND, (type of aircraft), HAS YOU IN SIGHT AND WILL MAINTAIN VISUAL SEPARATION.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
TRAFFIC, (clock position and distance), (direction) BOUND, (type of aircraft), HAS YOU IN SIGHT AND WILL MAINTAIN VISUAL SEPARATION.

Add

 

(e) Advise the pilots if the radar targets appear likely to merge.

Add

 

NOTE­
Issue this advisory in conjunction with the instruction to maintain visual separation, the advisory to the other aircraft of the converging course, or thereafter if the controller subsequently becomes aware that the targets are merging.

Add

 

EXAMPLE-
“Radar targets appear likely to merge.”

Add

 

b. TERMINAL. Control of aircraft maintaining visual separation may be transferred to an adjacent position/ sector/ facility. Coordination procedures must be specified in an LOA or facility directive.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 4­3­1, Letters of Agreement

Subparagraphs b thru c

 

Renumber c thru d


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 7­4­4. APPROACHES TO MULTIPLE RUNWAYS

2. BACKGROUND: In an effort to move towards proactive risk mitigation and the reduction of risk in the NAS, the Air Traffic Organization (ATO) adopted the Risk Analysis Process (RAP) from EUROCONTROL. The RAP tool, developed by EUROCONTROL, is used to quantify the level of risk present for any air traffic incident. RAP is a post­event investigation analysis process and is applied to events involving a loss of separation with a measure of compliance of less than 66 percent. These events are known as Risk Analysis Events (RAEs). The RAP is a Safety Management System (SMS) process that assesses the risk of an RAE. A review of several RAEs in the NAS indicted that approach clearances were being issued to aircraft at questionable times, such as high and fast on the downwind or base leg, which resulted in an overshoot of the extended runway centerline. This caused a conflict with aircraft on approach to the other runway with both aircraft in a side­by­side belly­up situation.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

7­4­4. APPROACHES TO MULTIPLE RUNWAYS

 

7­4­4. APPROACHES TO MULTIPLE RUNWAYS

a. All aircraft must be informed that approaches are being conducted to parallel/intersecting/ converging runways. This may be accomplished through use of the ATIS.

 

a. All aircraft must be informed that approaches are being conducted to parallel, intersecting, or converging runways. This may be accomplished through use of the ATIS.

b through c2

 

No Change

(a) Standard separation is provided until the aircraft are established on a heading which will intercept the extended centerline of the runway at an angle not greater than 30 degrees, and each aircraft has been issued and the pilot has acknowledged receipt of the visual approach clearance.

 

(a) Standard separation is provided until the aircraft are established on a heading which will intercept the extended centerline of the runway at an angle not greater than 30 degrees, and each aircraft has been issued and one pilot has acknowledged receipt of the visual approach clearance, and the other pilot has acknowledged receipt of the visual or instrument approach clearance.

NOTE-
The intent of the 30 degree intercept angle is to reduce the potential for overshoots of the final, and preclude side­by­side operations with one or both aircraft in a “belly­up” configuration during the turn. Aircraft performance, speed, and the number of degrees of the turn to the final are factors to be considered by the controller when vectoring aircraft to parallel runways.

 

NOTE-
1.
The intent of the 30 degree intercept angle is to reduce the potential for overshoots of the extended centerline of the runway and preclude side­by­side operations with one or both aircraft in a “belly­up” configuration during the turn. Aircraft performance, speed, and the number of degrees of the turn are factors to be considered when vectoring aircraft to parallel runways.

Add

 

2. Variances between heading assigned to intercept the extended centerline of the runway and aircraft ground track are expected due to the effect of wind and course corrections after completion of the turn and pilot acknowledgment of a visual approach clearance.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAA Publication, Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Chapter 15 “Effect of Wind.”

c2(b) through c3(c)

 

No Change

Add

 

(d) Each aircraft must be assigned headings which will allow the aircraft to intercept the extended centerline of the runway at an angle not greater than 30 degrees.

Add

 

NOTE-
1. The intent of the 30 degree intercept angle is to reduce the potential for overshoots of the extended centerline of the runway and preclude side­by­side operations with one or both aircraft in a “belly­up” configuration during the turn. Aircraft performance, speed, and the number of degrees of the turn are factors to be considered when vectoring aircraft to parallel runways.

Add

 

2. Variances between heading assigned to intercept the extended centerline of the runway and aircraft ground track are expected due to the effect of wind and course corrections after completion of the turn and pilot acknowledgment of a visual approach clearance.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAA Publication, Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Chapter 15 “Effect of Wind.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 9­2­7. ifr military training routes

2. BACKGROUND: FAA JO 7110.65, Pilot Controller Glossary (PCG) correctly defines the term “VERIFY" to mean “Request confirmation of information." The PCG also correctly leaves out the term “CONFIRM." Throughout the order, the term “VERIFY" is correctly used in EXAMPLES or PHRASEOLOGY when the intent of the phraseology is to "confirm" information. This change identifies an instances where the term is not used.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

9­2­7. ifr military training routes

 

9­2­7. ifr military training routes

Title thru e

 

No Change

PHRASEOLOGY-
(Call sign) CONFIRM YOUR EXIT FIX ESTIMATE AND REQUESTED ALTITUDE AFTER EXIT,
and if applicable,
THE NUMBER OF REENTRIES.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
(Call sign) VERIFY YOUR EXIT FIX ESTIMATE AND REQUESTED ALTITUDE AFTER EXIT,
and if applicable,
THE NUMBER OF REENTRIES.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: Appendix A. AIRCRAFT INFORMATION FIXED WING AIRCRAFT

2. BACKGROUND: FAA JO 7110.65 includes aircraft type designator and performance information. This information is currently a portion of the aircraft type designators that have been approved by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), which is responsible for issuing aircraft type designators for use in air traffic control. The FAA includes additional operational/procedural information such as FAA Weight Class, Same Runway Separation, and Land and Hold Short Operations (LAHSO) Grouping.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

Appendix A. AIRCRAFT INFORMATION FIXED WING AIRCRAFT

 

Appendix A. AIRCRAFT INFORMATION FIXED WING AIRCRAFT

 

 

See attachment


AERMACCHI SpA (Italy)
(Also AGUSTA, SIAI−MARCHETTI)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

MB-326

M326

1J/S

 

 

III

 

Change

S-211

S211

1J/S

 

 

III

 

BEECH AIRCRAFT COMPANY (USA)
(Also CCF, COLEMILL, DINFIA, EXCALIBUR, FUJI, HAMILTON, JETCRAFTERS, RAYTHEON, SWEARINGEN, VOLPAR)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

18 (turbine)

B18T

2T/S

2,000

2,000

II

1

BOEING COMPANY (USA)
(Also GRUMMAN, IAI, LOCKHEED­BOEING, MCDONNELL DOUGLAS, NORTHROP­GRUMMAN, ROHR)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Add

B747-8

B748

4J/H

 

 

III

 

Delete

KC-135A Stratotanker (J57 engines)

K35A

4J/H

2.500

3,000

III

 

Change

707-100 (C-137B)

B701

4J/L

3,500

3,500

III

9

Change

B737-800, BBJ2

B738

2J/L

4,000

4,000

III

9

Change

B737-900

B739

2J/L

4,000

4,000

III

9

Change

B777-200LR, B777-200LRF

To read:

B777-200LRF, B777-F

B77L

2J/H

 

 

III

9

BRITISH AEROSPACE (BAe) (UK)
(Also AIL, AVRO, BAC, BUCURESTI, DE HAVILLAND, HANDLEY−PAGE, HAWKER−SIDDELEY, JETSTREAM, KANPUR, MCDONNELL−DOUGLAS, RAYTHEON, SCOTTISH−AVIATION, VOLPAR)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

Nimrod

NIM

4J/L

 

 

III

 

BRITTEN NORMAN LTD. (A subsidiary of Pilatus Aircraft LTD.) (UK)
(Also AVIONS FAIREY, BAC, BUCURESTI, DE HAVILLAND, HAWKER­SIDDELEY, IRMA, PADC, ROMAERO, VICKERS)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Delete

Trident

TRID

3J/L

3,000

3,000

III

 

Appendix A­10
CANADAIR BOMBARDIER LTD. (Canada)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

CL-66, CV-580 (CC-109 Cosmopolitan)

CVLT

2T/L

1,500

1,500

III

7

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY (USA)
(Also AVIONES−COLOMBIA, COLEMILL, DINFIA, ECTOR, FMA, FUJI, REIMS, RILEY, SUMMIT, WREN)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Add

350, Corvalis, Columbia 300/350, LC40/42

COL3

1P/S

 

 

I

 

Add

400, Corvalis TT, Columbia 400, LC 41

COL4

1P/S

 

 

I

 

Appendix A­13
DASSAULT BREGUET (France)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Add

Falcon 7X

FA7X

3J/L

 

 

III

 

Change

Alpha jet

AJET

2J/S+

 

 

III

 

EMBRAER (Brazil)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Add

EMB-500, Phenom 100

E50P

2J/S

 

 

III

 

Add

EMB-505, Phenom 300

E55P

2J/S+

 

 

III

 

FAIRCHILD DORNIER (USA/FRG)
(Also CONAIR, FAIRCHILD−HILLER, FLEET, FOKKER, KAISER, PILATUS, SWEARINGEN)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

328

D328

2T/S+

2,000

2,000

III

7

GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE CORP. (USA)
(Also GRUMMAN, GRUMMAN AMERICAN, GULFSTREAM, GULFSTREAM AMERICAN, IAI)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

695 Jetprop Commander 980/1000

AC95

2T/S

2,500

2,500

II

6

Change

G­1159, G­1159B/TT, Gulfstream 2/2B/2SP/2TT

GLF2

2J/L

5,000

4,000

III

8

HAMILTON AVIATION (USA)
(Also VOLPAR)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

Little Liner

BE18

2P/S

1,400

1,000

II

4

Change

T­28 Nomair

T28

1P/S

2,500

2,500

III

 

ILYUSHIN (Russia)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

Il­38

IL38

4T/L

 

 

III

 

LOCKHEED CORP. (USA)
(Also AERITALIA, CANADAIR, FIAT, FOKKER, HOWARD, LEAR, LOCKHEED−BOEING, LOCKHEED−MARTIN, MBB, MESSERSCHMITT, MITSUBISHI, PACAERO, ROCKWELL, SABCA)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

F­117 Nighthawk

F117*

2J/L

 

 

III

 

Change

L­18 Lodestar (C­56/57/59/60, R50, XR50

L18

2P/S

1,800

2,000

III

8

MITSUBISHI AIRCRAFT INTERNATIONAL INC. (USA/Japan)
(Also BEECH, RAYTHEON)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

F­86 Sabre

F86*

1J/S+

4,000

4,000

III

 

NORD (France)
(Also AEROSPATIALE, HOLSTE, NORDFLUG, TRANSALL)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change/Add

1000,1001, 1002 Pingouin

ME08

1P/S

400

500

I

1

PARTENAVIA (Italy)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

P68, Victor, Observer

P68

2P/S

1,200

1,000

II

3

PIAGGIO (Industrie Aeronautiche E Meccaniche Rinaldo Piaggio SpA) (Italy)
(Also PIAGGIO−DOUGLAS, TRECKER)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Delete

PD-808

P808

2J/S+

4,000

3.500

III

9

PIPER AIRCRAFT CORP. (USA)
(Also AEROSTAR, AICSA, CHINCUL, COLEMILL, EMBRAER, INDAER CHILE, JOHNSTON, MACHEN, MILLER, NIEVA, SCHAFER, SEGUIN, PZL−MIELEC, TED SMITH, WAGAERO)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

PA­31T3­500 T­1040

PAT4

2T/S

1,300

1,200

II

 

Change

AP­60, Aerostar

AEST

 

 

 

 

5

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL CORP. (USA)
(Also AERO COMMANDER, CANADAIR, CCF, COMMANDER, COMMONWEALTH, GULFSTREAM, HAMILTON, MITSUBISHI, NOORDUYN, NORTH AMERICAN PACAERO, NORTH AMERICAN ROCKWELL, PACIFIC AIRMOTIVE,ROCKWELL, RYAN, SUD, TUSCO)

Action

Model

Type
Designator

Description

Performance Information

 

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

Change

695 Jetprop Commander 980/1000

AC95

2T/S

2,500

2,500

II

6

Delete

FR-06 Fanranger, Ranger 2000

R2TH

1J/S

 

 

III

 

Delete

X-31

X31

1J/S+

 

 

III

 

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