U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
Air Traffic Organization Policy

ORDER
JO 7110.65
U
Effective Date:
February 9, 2012
 
     
Subject:  Air Traffic Control
     Includes:  Change 1 effective 7/26/12, Errata to Change 1 effective 7/26/12,
    Change 2 effective 3/7/13, and Errata to Change 2 effective 3/7/13.
    Change 3 effective 8/22/13.
 


Briefing Guide

Change 3

Effective 8/22/13

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
2-1-4. OPERATIONAL PRIORITY
2񩧾8. RVSM OPERATIONS
2񪏙. AIRCRAFT IDENTITY
2񪣂0. AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

2. BACKGROUND: ICAO 2012 changes the way aircraft are required to file. This will require the use of the term MEDEVAC for civilian air ambulance flights in the Special Handling Section of the ICAO flight plan. To maintain consistency between ICAO and HOST flight plan filing, all civilian air ambulance flights will be required to file as a MEDEVAC instead of the previous term Lifeguard. The previous meaning of the term MEDEVAC has been removed. The term HOSP was added.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2-1-4. OPERATIONAL PRIORITY

 

2-1-4. OPERATIONAL PRIORITY

title thru a

 

No Change

b. Provide priority to civilian air ambulance flights 揕IFEGUARD. Air carrier/taxi usage of the 揕IFEGUARD call sign, indicates that operational priority is requested. When verbally requested, provide priority to military air evacuation flights (AIR EVAC, MED EVAC) and scheduled air carrier/air taxi flights. Assist the pilots of air ambulance/evacuation aircraft to avoid areas of significant weather and turbulent conditions. When requested by a pilot, provide notifications to expedite ground handling of patients, vital organs, or urgently needed medical materials.

 

b. Provide priority to civilian air ambulance flights (call sign 揗EDEVAC). Use of the MEDEVAC call sign indicates that operational priority is requested. When verbally requested, provide priority to AIR EVAC, HOSP, and scheduled air carrier/air taxi flights. Assist the pilots of MEDEVAC, AIR EVAC, and HOSP aircraft to avoid areas of significant weather and turbulent conditions. When requested by a pilot, provide notifications to expedite ground handling of patients, vital organs, or urgently needed medical materials.

NOTE
It is recognized that heavy traffic flow may affect the controller's ability to provide priority handling. However, without compromising safety, good judgment must be used in each situation to facilitate the most expeditious movement of a lifeguard aircraft

 

NOTE
It is recognized that heavy traffic flow may affect the controller's ability to provide priority handling. However, without compromising safety, good judgment must be used in each situation to facilitate the most expeditious movement of a MEDEVAC aircraft.

c thru m

 

No Change

NOTE-
An OPEN SKIES aircraft has priority over all 搑egular air traffic. 揜egular is defined as all aircraft traffic other than:
1. Emergencies.
2. Aircraft directly involved in presidential movement.
3. Forces or activities in actual combat.
4. Lifeguard, MED EVAC, AIR EVAC and active SAR missions.

 

NOTE-
An OPEN SKIES aircraft has priority over all 搑egular air traffic. 揜egular is defined as all aircraft traffic other than:
1. Emergencies.
2. Aircraft directly involved in presidential movement.
3. Forces or activities in actual combat.
4. MEDEVAC, and active SAR missions.

Add

 

5. AIR EVAC and HOSP aircraft that have requested priority handling.

     

OLD

 

NEW

2񩧾8. RVSM OPERATIONS

 

2񩧾8. RVSM OPERATIONS

title thru a

 

No Change

1. Ensure non璕VSM aircraft are not permitted in RVSM airspace unless they meet the criteria of excepted aircraft and are previously approved by the operations supervisor/CIC. The following aircraft are excepted: DOD, DOD certified aircraft operated by NASA (T38, F15, F18, WB57, S3, and U2 aircraft only), Lifeguard, manufacturer aircraft being flown for development/certification, and Foreign State aircraft. These exceptions are accommodated on a workload or traffic璸ermitting basis.

 

1. Ensure non璕VSM aircraft are not permitted in RVSM airspace unless they meet the criteria of excepted aircraft and are previously approved by the operations supervisor/CIC. The following aircraft are excepted: DOD, DODcertified aircraft operated by NASA (T38, F15, F18, WB57, S3, and U2 aircraft only), MEDEVAC, manufacturer aircraft being flown for development/certification, and Foreign State aircraft. These exceptions are accommodated on a workload or traffic璸ermitting basis.

     

OLD

 

NEW

2񪏙. AIRCRAFT IDENTITY

 

2񪏙. AIRCRAFT IDENTITY

Indicate aircraft identity by one of the following using combinations not to exceed seven alphanumeric characters:

 

Indicate aircraft identity by one of the following using combinations not to exceed seven alphanumeric characters:

a. Civil aircraft, including air璫arrier aircraft letter璬igit registration number including the letter 揟 prefix for air taxi aircraft, the letter 揕 for lifeguard aircraft, 3璴etter aircraft company designator specified in FAAO JO 7340.2, Contractions, followed by the trip or flight number. Use the operating air carrier's company name in identifying equipment interchange flights.

 

a. Civil aircraft, including the air璫arrier letter璬igit registration number which can include the letter 揟 for air taxi, the letter 揕 for MEDEVAC, or the 3璴etter company designator specified in FAA Order JO 7340.2, Contractions, followed by the trip or flight number. Use the operating air carrier's company name in identifying equipment interchange flights.

EXAMPLE-

 

No Change

NOTE-
The letter 揕 is not to be used for air carrier/air taxi lifeguard aircraft.

 

NOTE-
The letter 揕 is not to be used for air carrier/air taxi MEDEVAC aircraft.

 

OLD

 

NEW

2񪣂0. AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

 

2񪣂0. AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

title thru a3

 

No Change

4. Air carrier/taxi ambulance. State the prefix, 揕ifeguard, if used by the pilot, followed by the call sign and flight number in group form.

 

4. Air carrier/taxi ambulance. State the prefix 揗EDEVAC if used by the pilot, followed by the call sign and flight number in group form.

EXAMPLE-
Lifeguard Delta Fifty璒ne.

 

EXAMPLE-
MEDEVAC Delta Fifty璒ne.

5. Civilian air ambulance. State the word LIFEGUARD followed by the numbers/letters of the registration number.

 

5. Civilian air ambulance. State the word MEDEVAC followed by the numbers/letters of the registration number.

EXAMPLE-
Lifeguard Two Six Four Six.

 

EXAMPLE-
MEDEVAC Two Six Four Six.

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2񩻬. MILITARY DVFR DEPARTURES

2. BACKGROUND: Defense Visual Flight Rules (DVFR) is defined in 14 CFR 99.3 as 揳 flight within an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) conducted by any aircraft (except for Department of Defense and law enforcement aircraft) in accordance with visual flight rules in part 91 of this title."

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2񩻬. MILITARY DVFR DEPARTURES

 

2񩻬. DVFR DEPARTURES

TERMINAL

 

TERMINAL

Forward departure times on all military DVFR departures from joint璾se airports to the military operations office.

 

Forward departure times on all DVFR departures from joint璾se airports to the military operations office.

NOTE-
1.
Details for handling air carrier, nonscheduled civil, and military DVFR flight data are contained in FAAO JO 7610.4, Special Operations.

 

NOTE-
1.
Details for handling air carrier and nonscheduled civil DVFR flight data are contained in FAA Order JO 7610.4, Special Operations.

2. Military pilots departing DVFR from a joint璾se airport will include the phrase 揇VFR to (destination) in their initial call璾p to an FAA operated tower.

 

2. Civil pilots departing DVFR from a joint璾se airport will include the phrase 揇VFR to (destination) in their initial call璾p to an FAA璷perated tower.

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 2񫊛. PIREP INFORMATION

2. BACKGROUND: The FAA is responsible for providing meteorological data to stakeholders of the NAS. This includes disseminating and distributing observations, forecasts, and warning messages that pertain to volcanic activity including volcanic ash. PIREPs for volcanic activity and volcanic ash are provided to ATC in a specified format which is delineated in the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM). These reports are then forwarded to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) and are used to issue volcanic ash SIGMETs. These changes follow new ICAO guidelines as set forth by the International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group and are in effect as of November 2010.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

2񫊛. PIREP INFORMATION

 

2񫊛. PIREP INFORMATION

Significant PIREP information includes reports of strong frontal activity, squall lines, thunderstorms, light to severe icing, wind shear and turbulence (including clear air turbulence) of moderate or greater intensity, volcanic eruptions and volcanic ash clouds, and other conditions pertinent to flight safety.

 

Significant PIREP information includes reports of strong frontal activity, squall lines, thunderstorms, light to severe icing, wind shear and turbulence (including clear air turbulence) of moderate or greater intensity, volcanic eruptions and volcanic ash clouds, detection of sulfur gases (SO2 or H2S) in the cabin, and other conditions pertinent to flight safety.

REFERENCE thru a7

 

No Change

Add

 

8. Detection of sulfur gases (SO2 or H2S), associated with volcanic activity, in the cabin.

Add

 

NOTE
The smell of sulfur gases in the cockpit may indicate volcanic activity that has not yet been detected or reported and/or possible entry into an ash璪earing cloud. SO2 is identifiable as the sharp, acrid odor of a freshly struck match. H2S has the odor of rotten eggs.

a8

 

Renumber to a9

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 3񫞆. TAXI AND GROUND MOVEMENT OPERATIONS

2. BACKGROUND: The FAA Administrator has made numerous recommendations to enhance runway safety. ATO璗 Safety and Operations Support assembled a Safety Risk Management Panel (SRMP) to address some of the proposals from this workgroup. The panel completed a safety assessment on taxi procedures at tower controlled airports and concurred with a recommendation to require detailed routings be issued to all aircraft and vehicles on the movement area. The panel determined this would enhance runway safety.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

3񫞆. TAXI AND GROUND MOVEMENT OPERATIONS

 

3񫞆. TAXI AND GROUND MOVEMENT OPERATIONS

title thru b

 

No Change

Add

 

NOTE
If the specific taxi route ends into a connecting taxiway with the same identifier (for example, taxiway 揂 connects with Taxiway 揂1) at the approach end of the runway, the connecting taxiway may be omitted from the clearance.

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 3񬅥. TAKEOFF CLEARANCE

2. BACKGROUND: The original change (7110.65U, Change 1) established requirements for aircraft landing on or departing from runways that have a temporary or permanent change in runway length due to construction. Changes include: the requirement to use the term 搒hortened on the ATIS; use of the term 搒hortened in conjunction with all takeoff and landing clearances for a specified period; and prohibits use of the term 揻ull length when runway lengths have been temporarily shortened.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

3񬅥. TAKEOFF CLEARANCE

 

3񬅥. TAKEOFF CLEARANCE

title thru g1

 

No Change

2. The addition of 搒hortened must be included in the takeoff clearance until the Airport/Facility Directory is updated to include the change(s) when the runway is permanently shortened.

 

2. The addition of 搒hortened must be included in the takeoff clearance until the Airport/Facility Directory is updated to include the change(s) when the runway is permanently shortened.

PHRASEOLOGY-
RUNWAY (number) SHORTENED, CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
RUNWAY (number) SHORTENED, CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF.

EXAMPLE-
揜unway Two璖even shortened, cleared for takeoff.

 

EXAMPLE-
揜unway Two璖even shortened, cleared for takeoff.

PHRASEOLOGY-
RUNWAY (number) AT (taxiway designator) INTERSECTION DEPARTURE (remaining length) FEET AVAILABLE.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
RUNWAY (number) AT (taxiway designator) INTERSECTION DEPARTURE SHORTENED, CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF.

EXAMPLE-
揜unway Two璖even at Juliet, intersection departure, 5600 feet available.

 

EXAMPLE-
揜unway Two璖even at Juliet, intersection departure shortened, cleared for takeoff.

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 10񪏕1, Airport Construction FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 10񪏕2, Change in Runway Length Due to Construction

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 10񪏕1, Airport Construction FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 10񪏕2, Change in Runway Length Due to Construction



1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
3101. LANDING INFORMATION

2. BACKGROUND: In 2012 the Root Cause Analysis Team (RCAT) submitted a safety recommendation to Runway Safety Council (RSC) that a change to paragaraph 3101 揕anding Information" FAA Order JO 7110.65 be made. The request recommends air traffic controllers provide pilots with additional information when using the term 揷ontinue." This recommendation was presented to Terminal Operations & Procedures to process the minor formatting change to the paragraph for clarity.

3. CHANGE:

OLD

 

NEW

3101. LANDING INFORMATION

 

3101. LANDING INFORMATION

title thru a

 

No Change

PHRASEOLOGY-
ENTER LEFT/RIGHT BASE.
STRAIGHT璉N.
MAKE STRAIGHT璉N.
STRAIGHT璉N APPROVED.
RIGHT TRAFFIC.
MAKE RIGHT TRAFFIC.
RIGHT TRAFFIC APPROVED. CONTINUE.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
ENTER LEFT/RIGHT BASE.
STRAIGHT璉N.
MAKE STRAIGHT璉N.
STRAIGHT璉N APPROVED.
RIGHT TRAFFIC.
MAKE RIGHT TRAFFIC.
RIGHT TRAFFIC APPROVED.

Add

 

CONTINUE.

Add

 

NOTE
Additional information should normally be issued with instructions to continue. Example: 揷ontinue, report one mile final; 揷ontinue, expect landing clearance two mile final; etc.

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 4񪏘. DEPARTURE RESTRICTIONS, CLEARANCE VOID TIMES, HOLD FOR RELEASE, AND RELEASE TIMES

2. BACKGROUND: One of the first steps in the Joint Planning and Development Office's (JPDO) plans for the Next璆eneration Air Transportation System (NextGen) and the Operational Evolution Partnership (OEP) Flight Plan objectives is to develop and deploy a versatile, nationwide, time璪ased metering capability. JPDO and OEP plans document an end璽o璭nd time based flow management system that provides a more efficient alternative to today's miles璱n璽rail restrictions and ground stops. Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) is a comprehensive, automated method of planning efficient arrival trajectories from cruise altitude to the runway threshold. TMA increases situational awareness through its graphical displays, timelines, and load graphs. TMA trajectories are optimized for each aircraft to permit an accurate estimated time of arrival at an airport and provide scheduled times of arrival (meter times) that optimize the flow of traffic into a terminal area. Now that Phase 1 of the TMA development is complete, planning for the next generation of Time瑽ased Flow Management (TBFM) has begun. Phase 2 will include additional TMA airports, improve the functionality of TMA in support of Adjacent Center Metering (ACM), TRACON Metering, Enhanced Departure Capability (EDC), and point璱n璼pace metering.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

4񪏘. DEPARTURE RESTRICTIONS, CLEARANCE VOID TIMES, HOLD FOR RELEASE, AND RELEASE TIMES

 

4񪏘. DEPARTURE RESTRICTIONS, CLEARANCE VOID TIMES, HOLD FOR RELEASE, AND RELEASE TIMES

title thru c

 

No Change

d. When expect departure clearance times (EDCT) are assigned through traffic management programs, the departure terminal must, to the extent possible, plan ground movement of aircraft destined to the affected airport(s) so that flights are sequenced to depart no earlier than 5 minutes before, and no later than 5 minutes after the EDCT. Do not release aircraft on their assigned EDCT if a ground stop (GS) applicable to that aircraft is in effect, unless approval has been received from the originator of the GS.

 

d. When expect departure clearance times (EDCT) are assigned through traffic management programs, excluding overriding call for release (CFR) operations as described in subparagraph e, the departure terminal must, to the extent possible, plan ground movement of aircraft destined to the affected airport(s) so that flights are sequenced to depart no earlier than 5 minutes before, and no later than 5 minutes after the EDCT. Do not release aircraft on their assigned EDCT if a ground stop (GS) applicable to that aircraft is in effect, unless approval has been received from the originator of the GS.

d1 thru d3 NOTE

 

No Change

Add

 

e. Call for Release (CFR). When CFR is in effect, release aircraft so they are airborne within a window that extends from 2 minutes prior and ends 1 minute after the assigned time, unless otherwise coordinated.

Add

 

NOTE-
1. Subparagraph (e) applies to all facilities.

 

 

2. Coordination may be verbal, electronic, or written.

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 4񫱱. APPROACH CLEARANCE

2. BACKGROUND: Confusion exists within the controller and pilot communities concerning approach clearances for RNAV equipped aircraft and when a pilot is required to make a hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn when there is a hold璱n璴ieu pattern depicted at an in Ctermediate fix (IF) or initial approach fix (IAF). Additionally, controllers and pilots are not always clear which fix is the IF or when it is appropriate to clear aircraft to a fix between the IF and final approach fix (FAF). Lastly, groups representing the airline and business aircraft operators have also requested the method of clearing aircraft to the IF on RNAV or GPS approaches be extended to conventional instrument approach procedures. In addition to the above, changes are being made that take into account new criteria from the Flight Standards Service related to the title of an instrument approach procedure so that instrument landing system (ILS) approaches can be issued and when the glideslope is out of service, a localizer (LOC) approach clearance can be issued.

3. CHANGE:

OLD

 

NEW

4񫱱. APPROACH CLEARANCE

 

4񫱱. APPROACH CLEARANCE

a. Clear aircraft for 搒tandard or 搒pecial instrument approach procedures only. To require an aircraft to execute a particular instrument approach procedure, specify in the approach clearance the name of the approach as published on the approach chart. Where more than one procedure is published on a single chart and a specific procedure is to be flown, amend the approach clearance to specify execution of the specific approach to be flown. If only one instrument approach of a particular type is published, the approach needs not be identified by the runway reference. An aircraft conducting an ILS/MLS approach, when the glideslope/glidepath is reported out of service must be advised at the time an approach clearance is issued. Standard Instrument Approach Procedures must commence at an Initial Approach Fix or an Intermediate Approach Fix if there is not an Initial Approach Fix. Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures may begin at an Intermediate Approach Fix for aircraft that have filed an Advanced RNAV equipment suffix when the conditions of subpara b4 are met. Where adequate radar coverage exists, radar facilities may vector aircraft to the final approach course in accordance with para 5񬅝, Vectors to Final Approach Course.

 

a. Clear aircraft for 搒tandard or 搒pecial instrument approach procedures only. To require an aircraft to execute a particular instrument approach procedure, specify in the approach clearance the name of the approach as published on the approach chart. Where more than one procedure is published on a single chart and a specific procedure is to be flown, amend the approach clearance to specify execution of the specific approach to be flown. If only one instrument approach of a particular type is published, the approach needs not be identified by the runway reference. An aircraft conducting an ILS or LDA approach when the glideslope is reported out of service must be advised at the time an approach clearance is issued unless the title of the published approach procedure allows (for example, ILS Rwy 05 or LOC Rwy 05). Standard instrument approach procedures (SIAP) must begin at an initial approach fix (IAF) or an intermediate fix (IF) if there is not an IAF. Where adequate radar coverage exists, radar facilities may vector aircraft to the final approach course, or clear an aircraft to any fix 3 NM or more prior to the FAF along the final approach course in accordance with Paragraph 5񬅝, Vectors to Final Approach Course, and Paragraph 5񬅞, Final Approach Course Interception.

PHRASEOLOGY-
CLEARED (type) APPROACH.

(For a straight in approach IFR),

CLEARED STRAIGHT IN (type) APPROACH.

(To authorize a pilot to execute his/her choice of instrument approach),

CLEARED APPROACH.

(Where more than one procedure is published on a single chart and a specific procedure is to be flown),

CLEARED (specific procedure to be flown) APPROACH.

(To authorize a pilot to execute an ILS/MLS approach when the glideslope/glidepath is out of service),

CLEARED (type) APPROACH, GLIDESLOPE/GLIDEPATH UNUSABLE.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
CLEARED (type) APPROACH.

(For a straight in approach IFR),

CLEARED STRAIGHT IN (type) APPROACH.

(To authorize a pilot to execute his/her choice of instrument approach),

CLEARED APPROACH.

(Where more than one procedure is published on a single chart and a specific procedure is to be flown),

CLEARED (specific procedure to be flown) APPROACH.

(To authorize a pilot to execute an ILS or an LDA approach when the glideslope is out of service),

CLEARED (ILS/LDA) APPROACH, GLIDESLOPE UNUSABLE.

Add

 

(When the title of the approach procedure contains 搊r LOC)

Add

 

CLEARED LOCALIZER APPROACH

EXAMPLE-
揅leared Approach.
揅leared V璒璕 Approach.
揅leared V璒璕 Runway Three Six Approach.
揅leared F璏璖 Approach.
揅leared F璏璖 Runway Three Six Approach.
揅leared I璍璖 Approach.

 

EXAMPLE-
揅leared Approach.
揅leared V璒璕 Approach.
揅leared V璒璕 Runway ThreeSix Approach.
揅leared L璂瑼 Approach.
揅leared L璂瑼 Runway ThreeSix Approach.
揅leared I璍璖 Approach.

Add

 

揅leared Localizer Approach.

揅leared Localizer Back Course Runway One Three Approach.
揅leared RNAV Runway Two Two Approach.
揅leared GPS Runway Two Approach.
揅leared BRANCH ONE R璑AV Arrival and RNAV Runway One Three Approach.
揅leared I璍璖 Runway Three Six Approach, glideslope unusable.
揅leared M璍璖 Approach.
揅leared M璍璖 Runway Three Six Approach.

 

揅leared Localizer Back Course Runway OneThree Approach.
揅leared RNAV Z Runway TwoTwo Approach.
揅leared GPS Runway Two Approach.
揅leared BRANCH ONE Arrival and RNAV Runway OneThree Approach.
揅leared I璍璖 Runway ThreeSix Approach, glideslope unusable.
揅leared S璂璅 Approach.
Cleared G璍璖 Approach.

揅leared M璍璖 Runway Three Six Approach, glidepath unusable.

 

Delete

Note 1 thru Note 2

 

No Change

3. The name of the approach, as published, is used to identify the approach, even though a component of the approach aid, other than the localizer on an ILS or the azimuth on an MLS is inoperative. Where more than one procedure to the same runway is published on a single chart, each must adhere to all final approach guidance contained on that chart, even though each procedure will be treated as a separate entity when authorized by ATC. For example, Instrument Approach Procedures published on a chart as either HI璙OR/DME or TACAN 1 would be stated as either 揌I V璒璕/D璏璄 1 Runway Six Left Approach or 揌I TACAN 1 Runway Six Left Approach. The use of numerical identifiers in the approach name, or alphabetical identifiers with a letter from the end of the alphabet; e.g. X, Y, Z, such as 揌I TACAN 1 Rwy 6L or HI TACAN 2 Rwy 6L, or 揜NAV (GPS) Z Rwy 04 or RNAV (GPS) Y Rwy 04, denotes multiple straight璱n approaches to the same runway that use the same approach aid. Alphabetical suffixes with a letter from the beginning of the alphabet; e.g., A, B, C, denote a procedure that does not meet the criteria for straight璱n landing minimums authorization.

 

3. In some cases, the name of the approach, as published, is used to identify the approach, even though a component of the approach aid, other than the localizer on an ILS is inoperative. Where more than one procedure to the same runway is published on a single chart, each must adhere to all final approach guidance contained on that chart, even though each procedure will be treated as a separate entity when authorized by ATC. The use of alphabetical identifiers in the approach name with a letter from the end of the alphabet; for example, X, Y, Z, such as 揌I TACAN Z Rwy 6L or HI TACAN Y Rwy 6L, or 揜NAV (GPS) Z Rwy 04 or RNAV (GPS) Y Rwy 04, denotes multiple straight璱n approaches to the same runway that use the same approach aid. Alphabetical suffixes with a letter from the beginning of the alphabet; for example, A, B, C, denote a procedure that does not meet the criteria for straight璱n landing minimums authorization.

4. 14 CFR Section 91.175(j) requires a pilot to receive a clearance for a procedure turn when vectored to a final approach fix or position, conducting a timed approach, or when the procedure specifies 揘O PT.

 

4. 14 CFR Section 91.175(j) requires a pilot to receive a clearance to conduct a procedure turn when vectored to a final approach course or fix, conducting a timed approach, or when the procedure specifies 揘O PT.

Note 5 thru b

 

No Change

FIG 4񫱱
Approach Clearance Example

 

FIG 4񫱱
Approach Clearance Example

REFER TO FIGURE ON PAGE 4-8-2

 

REFER TO FIGURE ON PAGE 4-8-2

1. Established on a segment of a published route or instrument approach procedure.

 

1. Established on a segment of a published route or instrument approach procedure, or

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1: The aircraft is established on a segment of a published route at 5,000 feet. 揅leared V璒璕 Runway Three Four Approach.

 

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1: The aircraft is established on a segment of a published route at 5,000 feet. 揅leared V璒璕 Runway Three Four Approach.

b2 thru NOTE

 

No Change

Add

 

c. Except for visual approaches, do not clear an aircraft direct to the FAF unless it is also an IAF, wherein the aircraft is expected to execute the depicted procedure turn or hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn.

Add

 

d. For RNAV璭quipped aircraft operating on unpublished routes, issue approach clearance for conventional or RNAV SIAP only after the aircraft is:

Add

 

1. Established on a heading or course direct to the IAF at an intercept angle not greater than 90 degrees and is assigned an altitude in accordance with b2. Radar monitoring is required for RNAV (RNP) approaches when no procedure turn or hold-in-lieu of procedure turn will be executed.

Add

 

2. Established on a heading or course direct to the IF at an angle not greater than 90 degrees, provided the following conditions are met:

Add

 

(a) Assign an altitude in accordance with b2 that will permit a normal descent to the FAF.

Add

 

NOTE
Controllers should expect aircraft to descend at approximately 150300 feet per nautical mile when applying guidance in subpara d2(a).

Add

 

(b) Radar monitoring is provided to the IF.

Add

 

(c) The SIAP must identify the intermediate fix with the letters 揑F.

Add

 

(d) For procedures where an IAF is published, the pilot is advised to expect clearance to the IF at least 5 miles from the fix.

3. Established on a heading or course that will intercept the initial segment at the initial approach fix, or intermediate segment at the intermediate fix when no initial approach fix is published, for a GPS or RNAV instrument approach procedure at an angle not greater than 90 degrees. Angles greater than 90 degrees may be used when a hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn pattern is depicted at the fix for the instrument approach procedure. (See FIG 4񫱲.)

 

3. Established on a heading or course direct to a fix between the IF and FAF, in accordance with Paragraph 5񬅝, Vectors to Final Approach Course, and Paragraph 5񬅞, Final Approach Course Interception. (See FIG 4񫱲.)

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO 7110.65, Par 5񫊚, Methods
FAAO 7110.65, Chapter 5, Section 9, Radar Arrivals

FIG 4񫱲
Approach Clearance Example for RNAV Aircraft

 

FIG 4񫱲
Approach Clearance Example for RNAV Aircraft

REFER TO FIGURE ON PAGE 4-8-3

 

REFER TO FIGURE ON PAGE 4-8-3

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1 can be cleared direct to CENTR. The intercept angle at that IAF is 90 degrees or less. The minimum altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along the flight path to the IAF is 3,000 feet. If a hold in lieu of pattern is depicted and a straight璱n area is not defined (e.g., No PT indicated at the fix), the aircraft must be instructed to conduct a straight璱n approach if ATC does not want the pilot to execute a procedure turn. 揅leared direct CENTR, maintain at or above three thousand until CENTR, cleared straight璱n RNAV Runway One Eight approach.

Aircraft 2 cannot be cleared direct to CENTR unless the aircraft is allowed to execute a procedure turn. The intercept angle at that IAF is 90 degrees or less. The minimum altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along the flight path to the IAF is 3,000 feet. 揅leared direct LEFTT, maintain at or above three thousand until LEFTT, cleared RNAV Runway One Eight approach. The pilot does not have to be cleared for a straight璱n approach since no hold in lieu of pattern is depicted at LEFTT.

 

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1 can be cleared direct to CENTR. The intercept angle at that IAF is 90 degrees or less. The minimum altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along the flight path to the IAF is 3,000 feet. If a hold in lieu of procedure turn pattern is depicted and a straight璱n area is not defined (for example, No PT indicated at the fix), the aircraft must be instructed to conduct a straight璱n approach if ATC does not want the pilot to execute a hold璱n璴ieu procedure turn. 揅leared direct CENTR, maintain at or above three thousand until CENTR, cleared straight璱n RNAV Runway One Eight approach.

Aircraft 2 cannot be cleared direct to CENTR unless the aircraft is allowed to execute the hold璱n璴ieu璷f procedure turn. The intercept angle at that IF/IAF is greater than 90 degrees. The minimum altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along the flight path to the IAF is 3,000 feet. 揅leared direct CENTR, maintain at or above three thousand until CENTR, cleared RNAV Runway One Eight approach. The pilot is expected to proceed direct CENTR and execute the hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn.

Add

 

Aircraft 2 can be cleared direct LEFTT. The intercept angle at that IAF is 90 degrees or less. The minimum altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along the flight path to the IAF is 3,000 feet. 揅leared direct LEFTT, maintain at or above three thousand until LEFTT, cleared RNAV One璄ight approach. The pilot does not have to be cleared for a straight璱n approach since no hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn pattern is depicted at LEFTT.

Add

 

Aircraft 1 is more than 5 miles from SHANN. SHANN is a step down fix between the IF (CENTR) and the FAF. To clear Aircraft 1 to SHANN, ATC must ensure the intercept angle for the intermediate segment at SHANN is not greater than 30 degrees as described in paragraphs 5񬅞 and must be cleared to an altitude that will allow a normal descent to the FAF 揈xpect vectors to SHANN for RNAV Runway One璄ight Approach.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Chapter 5, Section 9, Radar Arrivals

Add

 

e. For both RNAV and conventional approaches, intercept angles greater than 90 degrees may be used when a procedure turn, a hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn pattern, or arrival holding is depicted and the pilot will execute the procedure. If a procedure turn, hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn, or arrival holding pattern is depicted and the angle of intercept is 90 degrees or less, the aircraft must be instructed to conduct a straight璱n approach if ATC does not want the pilot to execute a procedure turn or hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn. (See FIG 4񫱳.)

Add

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
CLEARED STRAIGHT璉N (type) APPROACH

Add

 

NOTE-
1. Restate 揷leared straight璱n in the approach clearance even if the pilot was advised earlier to expect a straight璱n approach.

Add

 

2. Some approach charts have an arrival holding pattern depicted at the IAF using a 搕hin line holding symbol. It is charted where holding is frequently required prior to starting the approach procedure so that detailed holding instructions are not required. The arrival holding pattern is not authorized unless assigned by ATC.

Add

 

EXAMPLE-
揅leared direct SECND, maintain at or above three thousand until SECND, cleared straight璱n ILS Runway One璄ight approach.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
AIM, Paragraph 5񪣅, Instrument Approach Procedure Charts
AIM, Paragraph 5񪣉, Procedure Turn and Hold璱n璍ieu of Procedure Turn

Add

 

FIG 4񫱳
Approach Clearance Example for RNAV Aircraft
On a Conventional Approach

Add

 

REFER TO GIFURE ON PAGE 4-8-4

Add

 

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1 can be cleared direct to XYZ VORTAC, and SECND because the intercept angle is 90 degrees or less.

Aircraft 2 cannot be cleared to XYZ VORTAC because the intercept angle is greater than 90 degrees.

Aircraft 2 can be cleared to SECND if allowed to execute the hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn pattern.

4. Established on a heading or course that will intercept the intermediate segment at the intermediate fix, when an initial approach fix is published, provided the following conditions are met:

 

Delete

(a) The instrument approach procedure is a GPS or RNAV approach.

 

Delete

(b) Radar monitoring is provided to the Intermediate Fix.

 

Delete

(c) The aircraft has filed an Advanced RNAV equipment suffix.

 

Delete

(d) The pilot is advised to expect clearance direct to the Intermediate Fix at least 5 miles from the fix.

 

Delete

(e) The aircraft is assigned an altitude to maintain until the Intermediate Fix.

 

Delete

(f) The aircraft is on a course that will intercept the intermediate segment at an angle not greater than 90 degrees and is at an altitude that will permit normal descent from the Intermediate Fix to the Final Approach Fix.

 

Delete

NOTE
Controllers should expect aircraft to descend at approximately 300 feet per NM when applying guidance in subpara 4(f) above.

 

Delete

Add

 

f. Clear RNAV璭quipped aircraft conducting RNAV instrument approach procedures that contain radius to fix (RF) legs:

Add

 

1. Via published transitions, or

Add

 

2. On a heading or course direct to the IAF/IF when a hold璱n璴ieu of procedure turn is published and the pilot will execute the procedure, or

Add

 

3. On a heading or course direct to the IAF/IF, at intercept angles no greater than 90 degrees and the distance to the waypoint beginning the RF leg is 6NM or greater, or

Add

 

4. With radar monitoring, on a heading or course direct to any waypoint 3 miles or more from the waypoint that begins the RF leg, at an intercept angle not greater than 30 degrees. (See FIG 4񫱴.)

Add

 

NOTE-
1. RNAV approaches (containing RF legs) that commence at 10,000 feet or above require special procedures that will be site specific and specified in a facility directive.

Add

 

2. An RF leg is defined as a curved segment indicating a constant radius circular path about a defined turn center that begins at a waypoint. RF legs may have maximum airspeeds charted for procedural containment that must be followed.

Add

 

3. If an aircraft is vectored off the procedure, expect the aircraft to request a return to an IAF.

Add

 

FIG 4񫱴
Radius to Fix (RF) and Track to Fix (TF)

Add

 

REFER TO GRAPHIC ON PAGE 4-8-4

Add

 

NOTE-
1. The segment between THIRD and FORTH in FIG 4񫱴 is an RF leg.

Add

 

2. The straight segments between waypoints in FIG 4񫱴 are TF legs.

Add

 

3. Aircraft cannot be vectored or cleared direct THIRD because that waypoint begins an RF leg.

Add

 

4. Aircraft cannot be vectored or cleared to TURNN or vectored to intercept the approach segment at any point between THIRD and FORTH because this is the RF leg.

Add

 

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1 can be cleared to SCOND because the distance to THIRD, where the RF leg begins is 3NM or greater and the intercept angle will be 30 degrees or less and is radar monitored.

Aircraft 2 can be cleared direct to FIRST because the intercept angle is 90 degrees or less and the distance from FIRST to THIRD is 6NM or greater.

Paragraphs c and d

 

Re璴etter g and h

e. Where a Terminal Arrival Area (TAA) has been established to support RNAV approaches use the procedures under subpara b1 and b2 above. (See FIG 483.)

 

i. Where a terminal arrival area (TAA) has been established to support RNAV approaches, use the procedures under subpara b1 and b2 above. (See FIG 485.)

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1: The aircraft has crossed the TAA boundary and is established on a segment of the approach. 揅leared RNAV Runway One Eight Approach.

Aircraft 2: The aircraft is inbound to the CHARR (right corner) IAF on an unpublished direct route at 7,000 feet. The minimum IFR altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along this flight path to the IAF is 5,000 feet. 揅leared direct CHARR, Maintain at or above five thousand until entering the TAA, Cleared RNAV Runway One Eight Approach.

 

EXAMPLE-
Aircraft 1: The aircraft has crossed the TAA boundary and is therefore established on a segment of the approach. 揅leared RNAV Runway OneEight Approach.

Aircraft 2: The aircraft is inbound to the CHARR IAF on an unpublished direct route at 7,000 feet. The minimum IFR altitude for IFR operations (14 CFR Section 91.177) along this flight path to the IAF is 5,000 feet. 揅leared direct CHARR, maintain at or above five thousand until entering the TAA, cleared RNAV Runway OneEight Approach.

FIG 483
Basic 揟 and TAA Design

 

FIG 485
Basic 揟 and TAA Design

FIG

 

REFER TO GRAPHIC ON PAGE 4-8-5

Subparagraphs f thru h

 

Re璶umber j thru l

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
5񪣃. METHODS
5-4-5. TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF
5񪣇. POINT OUT

2. BACKGROUND: Before 1980, FAA Order JO 7110.65, paragraph 5񪣃, contained additional information to be included when conducting handoffs and/or pointouts. This additional information was called "other pertinent information that was not available to the receiving controller" and generally was direction of flight information such as route, heading, observed track, etc. In 1980, this information was removed from the paragraph and an appendix was added that provided very detailed information, examples, and phraseology for the transfer of control of aircraft. In 1988, the appendix was removed from JO 7110.65; however, no information was reintroduced into paragraph 5񪣃. Paragraph 5񪣃 is being revised to include this type of information.

This change adds 搒peed" to the parameters that are coordinated during handoff to highlight the effect of uncoordinated aircraft speed adjustments within a sector. Controllers accept point outs and make decisions based on visual data. When an aircraft makes uncoordinated changes in the airspace the controller's entire traffic situation can be adversely affected. This change cancels and incorporates N JO 7110.603, Pertinent Handoff and Point Out Information, effective October 15, 2012.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5񪣃. METHODS

 

5񪣃. METHODS

title thru b3 NOTE

 

No Change

Add

 

4. Advise the receiving controller of pertinent information not contained in the data block or available flight data unless covered in an LOA or facility directive. Pertinent information may include:

Add

 

(a) Assigned heading.

Add

 

(b) Speed/altitude restrictions.

Add

 

(c) Observed track or deviation from the last route clearance.

Add

 

(d) Any other pertinent information.

PHRASEOLOGY-
HANDOFF/POINT璒UT/TRAFFIC (aircraft position)(aircraft ID),
or
(discrete beacon code point璷ut only) (altitude, restrictions, and other appropriate information, if applicable).

 

PHRASEOLOGY-
HANDOFF/POINT璒UT/TRAFFIC (aircraft position)(aircraft ID),
or
(discrete beacon code point璷ut only) (altitude, restrictions, and other pertinent information, if applicable).

     

OLD

 

NEW

5-4-5. TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

 

5񪣅. TRANSFERRING CONTROLLER HANDOFF

title thru a

 

No Change

b. Verbally obtain the receiving controller's approval prior to making any changes to an aircraft's flight path, altitude, or data block information while the handoff is being initiated or after acceptance, unless otherwise specified by a LOA or a facility directive.

 

b. Verbally obtain the receiving controller's approval prior to making any changes to an aircraft's flight path, altitude, speed, or data block information while the handoff is being initiated or after acceptance, unless otherwise specified by a LOA or a facility directive.


OLD

 

NEW

5񪣇. POINT OUT

 

5񪣇. POINT OUT

title thru a1

 

No Change

2. Obtain the receiving controller's approval before making any changes to an aircraft's flight path, altitude, or data block information after the point out has been approved.

 

2. Obtain the receiving controller's approval before making any changes to an aircraft's flight path, altitude, speed, or data block information after the point out has been approved.


1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 5񪶰. MINIMA

2. BACKGROUND: MEARTS Single Source Polygon was developed for MEARTS facilities to provide radar coverage in areas where the Single Sensor Mode radar had no coverage and single sensor radar was required. Single Sensor Polygon allows the controller to remain in Mosaic Mode and transition to 5 mile radar separation instead of nonradar separation when the single sensor is not receiving a target return. This is accomplished by using automation to display targets not eligible for three mile separation differently than targets that are eligible for three mile separation. This procedure became operational in the San Juan Combined Center/RAPCON (CERAP) on November 3, 2007 and no incidents have occurred and no new hazards have been identified.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

5񪶰. MINIMA

 

5񪶰. MINIMA

title thru a3

 

No Change

b. Stage A/DARC, MEARTS Mosaic Mode, Terminal Mosaic/Multi璖ensor Mode:

 

b. Stage A/DARC, Terminal Mosaic/ Multi璖ensor Mode:

b1 thru b4(d)

 

No Change

c. MEARTS Mosaic Mode:

 

c. MEARTS Mosaic Mode:

Add

 

1. Below FL 600 5 miles.

Add

 

2. At or above FL 600 10 miles.

Add

 

3. For areas meeting all of the following conditions 3 miles:

Add

 

(a) Radar site adaptation is set to single sensor mode.

NOTE-
1. Sensor Mode displays information from the radar input of a single site.

 

NOTE-
1. Single sensor Mode displays information from the radar input of a single site.

2. Procedures to convert MEARTS Mosaic Mode to MEARTS Sensor Mode at each PVD/MDM will be established by facility directive.

 

2. Procedures to convert MEARTS Mosaic Mode to MEARTS Single Sensor Mode at each PVD/MDM will be established by facility directive.

Add

 

(b) Significant operational advantages can be obtained.

Add

 

(c) Within 40 miles of the antenna.

Add

 

(d) Below FL 180.

Add

 

(e) Facility directives specifically define the area where the separation can be applied and define the requirements for displaying the area on the controller's PVD/MDM.

Add

 

4. MEARTS Mosaic Mode Utilizing Single Source Polygon (San Juan CERAP and Honolulu Control Facility only) when meeting all of the following conditions 3 miles:

1. When less than 40 miles from the antenna 3 miles

 

(a) Less than 40 miles from the antenna, below FL180, and targets are from the adapted sensor.

Add

 

(b) The single source polygon must be displayed on the controller's PVD/MDM.

Add

 

(c) Significant operational advantages can be obtained.

Add

 

(d) Facility directives specifically define the single source polygon area where the separation can be applied and specify procedures to be used.

Add

 

(e) Controller must commence a transition to achieve either vertical separation or 5 mile lateral separation in the event that either target is not from the adapted sensor.

2. When 40 miles or more from the antenna 5 miles.

 

Delete

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
8101. APPLICATION
8103. LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION
8104. LATERAL SEPARATION

2. BACKGROUND: The North American (NAM) ICAO Region encompasses both Anchorage Arctic Control Area (CTA) and Anchorage Continental CTA; therefore, a change to the area of application of separation in those areas is necessary to maintain consistency with other Section titles in Chapter 8.

There is a need to add a provision to FAA Order JO 7110.65 for 50NM longitudinal (D50) separation as well as 30NM lateral/30NM longitudinal (30/30) separation within the Anchorage Oceanic and Anchorage Continental CTAs.

Due to changes in separation requirements, a provision to FAA Order JO 7110.65 is necessary to reflect a standard of 30NM lateral within the Anchorage Oceanic and Anchorage Continental CTAs.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

Section 10. North American ICAO Region Arctic CTA

 

Section 10. North American ICAO Region

8101. APPLICATION

 

8101. APPLICATION

Provide air traffic control services in the North American ICAO Region Arctic CTA with the procedures and minima contained in this section.

 

Provide air traffic control services in the North American ICAO Region with the procedures and minima contained in this section.

OLD

 

NEW

8103. LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION

 

8103. LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION

In accordance with Chapter 8, Offshore/Oceanic Procedures, Section 3, Longitudinal Separation, apply the following:

 

In accordance with Chapter 8, Offshore/Oceanic Procedures, Section 3, Longitudinal Separation, apply the following:

Add

 

a. Minima based on time:

a. 15 minutes between turbojet aircraft.

 

1. 15 minutes between turbojet aircraft; or

b. The prescribed minima in accordance with para 8񪏗, Mach Number Technique.

 

2. The prescribed minima in accordance with Paragraph 8񪏗, Mach Number Technique; or

c. 20 minutes between other aircraft.

 

3. 20 minutes between other aircraft.

Add

 

b. Minima based on distance using Automatic Dependent Surveillance Contract (ADS瑿) in the Anchorage Oceanic and Anchorage Continental CTAs only:

Add

 

NOTE
The minima described in this paragraph are not applicable within airspace in the Anchorage Arctic CTA.

Add

 

1. Apply the minima as specified in TBL 8101 between aircraft on the same track within airspace in the Anchorage Oceanic and Anchorage Continental CTAs designated for Required Navigation Performance (RNP), provided:

Add

 

(a) Direct controller/pilot communication via voice or Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) is established, and

Add

 

(b) The required ADS瑿 periodic reports are maintained and monitored by an automated flight data processor (for example, Ocean21).

Add

 

TBL 8101
ADS瑿 Criteria

ADD TABLE

Add

 

2. Aircraft on reciprocal tracks in the Anchorage Oceanic and Anchorage Continental CTAs may be cleared to climb or descend to or through the altitude(s) occupied by another aircraft provided:

Add

 

(a) An ADS瑿 position report on at least one of the aircraft has been received beyond the passing point, and

Add

 

(b) The aircraft have passed each other by the applicable separation minimum.

Add

 

NOTE
Ocean21 has been designed to check for the above criteria prior to allowing the minima to be provided.

Add

 

3. When an ADS瑿 periodic or waypoint change event report is overdue by 3 minutes, the controller must take action to obtain an ADS瑿 report.

Add

 

4. If no report is received within 6 minutes of the time the original report was due, the controller must take action to apply another form of separation.

     

OLD

 

NEW

8104. LATERAL SEPARATION

 

8104. LATERAL SEPARATION

In accordance with Chapter 8, Offshore/Oceanic Procedures, Section 4, Lateral Separation, apply the following:

 

In accordance with Chapter 8, Offshore/Oceanic Procedures, Section 4, Lateral Separation, apply the following:

a Provide 90 NM lateral separation between aircraft, or

 

a. 50 NM to RNP-10 approved aircraft within areas where RNP-10 separation and procedures are authorized,

b. Lower minima in para 5.4.1 of Chapter 5 of the Procedures for Air Navigation-Services, Air Traffic Management (PANS-ATM), (Doc 4444-ATM/501) may be applied or further reduced in accordance with para 5.11 of the same part where the conditions specified in the relevant PANS-ATM are met.

 

b.30 NM to RNP-4 approved aircraft operating within the Anchorage Oceanic CTA and Anchorage Continental CTA when direct controller/pilot communications, via voice or Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC), and the required ADS-C contracts are maintained and monitored by an automated flight data processor (for example, Ocean21).

Add

 

NOTE
The minimum described in subparagraph b is not applicable within airspace in the Anchorage Arctic CTA.

Add

 

c. 90 NM to aircraft not covered by subparagraphs a or b.

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 9񩻱. SPECIAL INTEREST SITES

2. BACKGROUND: Air traffic facilities have asked for a clarification as to the specific responsibilities of air traffic controllers under paragraph 9񩻱, Special Interest Sites.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

9񩻱. SPECIAL INTEREST SITES

 

9񩻱. SPECIAL INTEREST SITES

a. Relay immediately to supervisory/CIC personnel any reports or information regarding unusual aircraft activities in the vicinity of special interest sites such as nuclear power plants, power plants, dams, refineries, etc. Supervisory/CIC personnel may also receive reports/information from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or other sources.

 

Immediately relay any reports or information regarding unusual aircraft activities in the vicinity of special interest sites such as nuclear power plants, power plants, dams, refineries, etc., to supervisory/CIC personnel.

b. Supervisory/CIC personnel must immediately notify local law enforcement authorities of these reports/information as well as notifying the overlying air traffic facility of any of these reports and the action taken.

 

Delete

c. ARTCCs must promptly advise the Domestic Events Network (DEN) of any actions taken in accordance with this paragraph.

 

Delete

Add

 

NOTE
Air traffic controllers have no responsibilities to monitor or observe aircraft in the vicinity of special interest sites unless directed by supervisory/CIC personnel.

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 9񩻪2. OPEN SKIES TREATY AIRCRAFT

2. BACKGROUND: An earlier DCP was initiated to clarify a misunderstanding that SUA must be always be vacated for Open Skies F and D aircraft. However, that DCP raised questions and drew comments regarding its wording. The intent is to clarify that Open Skies F and D aircraft can transit active SUA but only in accordance with an LOA coordinated between the using agency and controlling agency that ensures Open Skies F and D aircraft transiting Active SUA are in compliance with paragraph 9-34, Transiting Active SUA/ATCAA. The LOA does not necessarily need to be specific to Open Skies, but a concern has been that para 9񪏘 could overshadow the rules of para 9񩻪2c and be misinterpreted to allow Open Skies F and D flights to transit active SUA not associated with an ATC facility. When Open Skies F and D aircraft transit SUA, there must be an ATC facility that will provide standard separation services at all times. Otherwise, the SUA must be vacated. In some instances, coordination between the using agency and controlling agency can designate airspace (i.e., block altitudes, stratification, or partitioning of airspace) that provides additional separation for Open Skies F and D aircraft from activities in SUA.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

9񩻪2. OPEN SKIES TREATY AIRCRAFT

 

9񩻪2. OPEN SKIES TREATY AIRCRAFT

title thru b

 

No Change

c. OPEN SKIES (F and D) Treaty aircraft, while maintaining compliance with ATC procedures, must have priority over activities in special use airspace (SUA) and must be allowed to transit such airspace as filed after appropriate and timely coordination has been accomplished between the using agency and controlling agency.

 

c. OPEN SKIES F and D Treaty aircraft, while maintaining compliance with ATC procedures, must have priority over activities in special use airspace (SUA) and must be allowed to transit such airspace as filed after appropriate and timely coordination has been accomplished between the using agency and controlling agency. A letter of agreement is required between the using agency and the controlling agency for Open Skies F and D aircraft to transit active SUA. When Open Skies F and D aircraft transit SUA, an ATC facility must provide standard separation services at all times.

Add

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 9񪏘 Transiting Active SUA/ATCAA

 

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
9񪏕. APPLICATION
9-3-2. SEPARATION MINIMA

2. BACKGROUND: There has been confusion as to the overall use of stationary ALTRVs throughout the NAS. Additionally, a need has been identified for airspace designation for very specific special operations to include commercial space, rockets, and missiles. Based on a number of non璫oncurs, the 7610.4 changes having to do with Stationary ALTRVs was amended.

3. CHANGE: 

OLD

 

NEW

Section 3. Special Use and ATC Assigned Airspace

 

Section 3. Special Use, ATCAssigned Airspace, and Stationary ALTRVs

9񪏕. APPLICATION

 

9񪏕. APPLICATION

Apply the procedures in this section to aircraft operating in proximity to special use or ATC assigned airspace (ATCAA) unless the airspace is designated an Alert Area/Controlled Firing Area or one of the following conditions exist:

 

Apply the procedures in this section to aircraft operating in proximity to special use, ATCassigned airspace (ATCAA), and stationary ALTRVs unless the airspace is designated an alert area/controlled firing area or one of the following conditions exist:

Note thru b

 

No Change

c. The Restricted/Warning Area, MOA, or ATCAA has been released to the controlling agency.

 

c. The restricted/warning area, MOA, ATCAA, or stationary ALTRV has been released to the controlling agency.

d. The aircraft is on an approved ALTRV, unless the airspace area in question is an ATCAA.

 

d. The aircraft is on an approved ALTRV, unless the airspace area in question is an ATCAA.

NOTE
Mission project officers are responsible for obtaining approval for ALTRV operations within Prohibited/ Restricted/Warning Areas and MOAs.

 

NOTE
Mission project officers are responsible for obtaining approval for ALTRV operations within prohibited/ restricted/warning areas, MOAs, and stationary

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 9񪏘, Transiting Active SUA/ATCAA

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7110.65, Para 9񪏘, Transiting Active SUA/ATCAA.

e. Operations in special use airspace located in offshore/oceanic airspace will be conducted in accordance with the procedures in Chapter 8, Offshore/Oceanic Procedures.

 

e. Operations in special use airspace and stationary ALTRVs located in offshore/oceanic airspace will be conducted in accordance with the procedures in Chapter 8, Offshore/Oceanic Procedures.

OLD

 

NEW

9-3-2. SEPARATION MINIMA

 

9񪏖. SEPARATION MINIMA

Unless clearance of nonparticipating aircraft in/through/adjacent to a Prohibited/Restricted/ Warning Area/MOA/ATCAA is provided for in a Letter of Agreement (LOA) or Letter of Procedure (LOP), separate nonparticipating aircraft from active special use airspace by the following minima:

 

Unless clearance of nonparticipating aircraft in/through/adjacent to a prohibited/restricted/ warning area/MOA/ATCAA/stationary ALTRV is provided for in a letter of agreement (LOA) or letter of procedure (LOP), separate nonparticipating aircraft from active special use airspace, ATCAAs, and stationary ALTRVs by the following minima:

a. Assign an altitude consistent with para 4񪶮, Flight Direction, and 4񪶯, Exceptions, which is at least 500 feet (above FL 2901000 feet) above/ below the upper/lower limit of the Prohibited/ Restricted/Warning Area/MOA/ATCAA.

 

a. Assign an altitude consistent with para 4񪶮, Flight Direction, and 4񪶯, Exceptions, which is at least 500 feet (above FL 2901000 feet) above/below the upper/lower limit of the prohibited/ restricted/warning area/MOA/ ATCAA/stationary ALTRV.

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 2񩧽7, Prohibited/Restricted Areas

 

REFERENCE-
FAAO JO 7210.3, Para 2񩧽7, Prohibited/Restricted Areas and Stationary ALTRVs

b. Provide radar separation of 3 miles (En route Stage A/DARC, FL 600 and above 6 miles) from the special use airspace peripheral boundary.

 

b. Provide radar separation of 3 miles (FL 600 and above 6 miles) from the special use airspace, ATCAA, or stationary ALTRV peripheral boundary.

c. Clear aircraft on airways or routes whose widths or protected airspace do not overlap the peripheral boundary.

 

c. Clear aircraft on airways or routes whose widths or protected airspace do not overlap the peripheral boundary.

d. Exception. Some Prohibited/Restricted/ Warning Areas are established for security reasons or to contain hazardous activities not involving aircraft operations. Where facility management has identified these areas as outlined in FAAO JO 7210.3, Facility Operation and Administration, vector aircraft to remain clear of the peripheral boundary.

 

d. Exception. Some prohibited/restricted/ warning areas are established for security reasons or to contain hazardous activities not involving aircraft operations. Where facility management has identified these areas as outlined in FAA Order JO 7210.3, Facility Operation and Administration, vector aircraft to remain clear of the peripheral boundary.

NOTE
Nonparticipating aircraft refers to those aircraft for which you have separation responsibility and which have not been authorized by the using agency to operate in/through the special use airspace or ATCAA in question.

 

NOTE
Nonparticipating aircraft refers to those aircraft for which you have separation responsibility and which have not been authorized by the using agency to operate in/through the special use airspace, ATCAA, or stationary ALTRV in question. VFR traffic is not prohibited from transiting stationary ALTRVs.

1. PARAGRAPH NUMBER AND TITLE: 
11񩧽. DUTY RESPONSIBILITY
11񩧾. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
11񩧿. TIME BASED FLOW MANAGEMENT (TBFM)

2. BACKGROUND: One of the first steps in the Joint Planning and Development Office's (JPDO) plans for the Next璆eneration Air Transportation System (NextGen) and the Operational Evolution Partnership (OEP) Flight Plan objectives is to develop and deploy a versatile, nationwide, time璪ased metering capability. JPDO and OEP plans document an end璽o璭nd time based flow management system that provides a more efficient alternative to today's miles璱n璽rail restrictions and ground stops. Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) is a comprehensive, automated method of planning efficient arrival trajectories from cruise altitude to the runway threshold. TMA increases situational awareness through its graphical displays, timelines, and load graphs. TMA trajectories are optimized for each aircraft to permit an accurate estimated time of arrival at an airport and provide scheduled times of arrival (meter times) that optimize the flow of traffic into a terminal area. Now that Phase 1 of the TMA development is complete, planning for the next generation of Time瑽ased Flow Management (TBFM) has begun. Phase 2 will include additional TMA airports, improve the functionality of TMA in support of Adjacent Center Metering (ACM), TRACON Metering, Enhanced Departure Capability (EDC), and point璱n璼pace metering.

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11񩧽. DUTY RESPONSIBILITY

 

11񩧽. DUTY RESPONSIBILITY

a. The traffic management system mission is to balance air traffic demand with system capacity to ensure the maximum efficient utilization of the NAS.

 

a. The mission of the traffic management system is to balance air traffic demand with system capacity to ensure the maximum efficient utilization of the NAS.


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11񩧾. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

11񩧾. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

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b. OS must:

 

b. FLM must:

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d. ARTCCs, unless otherwise coordinated, must:

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1. Support TMA operations and monitor TMA equipment to improve situational awareness for a system approach to traffic management initiatives.

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2. Monitor arrival flow for potential metering actions/changes and, if necessary, initiate coordination with all facilities to discuss the change to the metering plan.

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e. TRACONs, unless otherwise coordinated, must:

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1. Support TMA operations and monitor TMA equipment to improve situational awareness for a system approach to traffic management initiatives.

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2. Monitor arrival flow for potential metering actions/changes and, if necessary, initiate coordination with all facilities to discuss the change to the metering plan.

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3. Schedule internal departures in accordance with specific written procedures and agreements developed with overlying ARTCCs and adjacent facilities.

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f. ATCTs, unless otherwise coordinated, must:

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1. Monitor TMA equipment to improve situational awareness for a system approach to traffic management initiatives.

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2. Release aircraft, when CFR is in effect, so they are airborne within a window that extends from 2 minutes prior and ends 1 minute after the assigned time.

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NOTE
Coordination may be verbal, electronic, or written.

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11񩧿. TIME BASED FLOW MANAGEMENT (TBFM)

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During periods of metering, ATCS must:

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a. Display TMA schedule information on the main display monitor (MDM).

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b. Comply with TMA璯enerated metering times within +/ 1 minute.

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1. If TMA璯enerated metering time accuracy within +/ 1 minute cannot be used for specific aircraft due to significant jumps in the delay countdown timer (DCT), other traffic management initiatives may be used between those aircraft such as miles璱n璽rail (MIT) or minutes璱n璽rail (MINIT) to assist in delay absorption until stability resumes.

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2. An exception to the requirement to comply within +/ 1 minute may be authorized for certain ARTCC sectors if explicitly defined in an appropriate facility directive.

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c. When compliance is not possible, coordinate with FLM and adjacent facilities/sectors as appropriate.

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NOTE
TMA accuracy of generated metering times is predicated on several factors, including vectoring outside of TMA route conformance boundaries (route recovery logic), certain trajectory ground speed calculations, and when TMU resequences a specific flight or flight list. Caution should be used in these situations to minimize impact on surrounding sector traffic and complexity levels, flight efficiencies, and user preferences.

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