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150/5200-32B AAS-300 Reporting Wildlife Aircraft Strikes

This AC explains the importance of reporting collisions between aircraft and wildlife, more commonly referred to as wildlife strikes. It also explains recent improvements in the FAA’s Bird/Other Wildlife Strike Reporting system, how to report a wildlife strike, what happens to the wildlife strike report data, how to access the FAA National Wildlife Strike Database (NWSD), and the FAA’s Feather Identification program.

05-31-2013
61-140 AFS-800 Autorotation Training

The purpose of this advisory circular (AC) is to describe enhanced guidelines for autorotations during rotorcraft/helicopter flight training. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has found a need to raise awareness of the risks inherent in performing autorotations in the training environment, and in particular the 180 degree autorotation. In this AC, the FAA recommends procedures that will mitigate safety risk during autorotations. This information is intended to supplement information about autorotation training found in the current edition of the Helicopter Flying Handbook (HFH), FAA-H-8083-21. This AC is not mandatory and does not constitute a regulation. This AC describes an acceptable means, but not the only means, of training applicants for a rotorcraft/helicopter airman to meet the qualifications for various rotorcraft/helicopter ratings under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61.  You may use alternate methods for training if you establish that those methods meet the requirements of the HFH and FAA practical test standards (PTS).

05-23-2013
20-180 AIR-110 Approved Model List Supplemental Type Certificate (AML-STC)

This advisorycircular(AC)providesguidelines and requirements to obtain approved model list (AML)supplemental typecertificate(STC).  This ACis not mandatoryand does not constitutearegulation.  It describes anacceptablemethod, but not theonlymethod to obtain an AML-STC.  You mayusean alternatemethod ifyou establish that it adequatelymeets therequirements.  However, ifyou usethis ACto obtain approval,you must comply with all ofits provisions.

05-14-2013
43-213A AFS-300 Parts Marking Identification

This advisory circular (AC) provides information and guidance on developing procedures for part marking and part re-marking when performing maintenance, alteration, and fabrication, including the fabrication of owner- or operator-produced parts.

05-14-2013
120-103A AFS-220 Fatigue Risk Management Systems for Aviation Safety

 

 

(1) Describes the basic concepts of Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS), as prescribed in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 117, § 117.7, and how they relate to aviation industry employees safely performing their duties.

(2) Provides information on the components of an FRMS as applied to aviation, and on how to implement an FRMS within an aviation operation.

(3) Defines an FRMS as an operator-specific process; therefore, while all FRMSs will have common elements, the specifics will be tailored to a certificate holder’s particular conditions.

(4) Provides (in Appendix 2, Fatigue Risk Management System Development) the certificate holder with the necessary detailed guidance to prepare for the FRMS approval process, develop the required documentation, develop and apply fatigue risk management (FRM) and Safety Assurance (SA) processes, collect and analyze data, develop flightcrew FRMS operations procedures and a step-by-step process required for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) evaluation and validation of the proposed FRMS application.

05-06-2013
25.1302-1 ANM-111 Installed Systems and Equipment for Use by the Flightcrew

This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance for the design and methods of compliance for installed equipment on transport airplanes intended for use by the flightcrew. The guidance provided by this AC is intended to minimize the occurrence of design-related errors by the flightcrew and to enable the flightcrew to detect and manage errors that do occur. This AC provides recommendations for the design and evaluation of controls, displays, system behavior, and system integration that are all part of human factors considerations.

AH Bahrami

05-03-2013
90-93B AJT-0 Operating Procedures for Airport Traffic Control Towers (ATCT) that are not Operated by, or Under Contract with, the United States (Non-Federal)

This advisory circular (AC) recommends publications, administrative, and operational procedures that will assist in the management of a non-Federal ATCT (NFCT).

04-22-2013
120-105A AFS-410 Foreign Terminal Instrument Procedures (FTIP) Acceptance/Review

This advisory circular (AC) establishes guidelines for U.S. operators to use when reviewing Foreign Terminal Instrument Procedures (FTIP). Occasionally, the author uses the word "must" or similar language when he deems the desired actions critical. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) does not intend for the use of such language to add to, interpret, or relieve a duty imposed by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR).

04-18-2013
43-209A AFS-300 Recommended Inspection Procedures for Former Military Aircraft

This advisory circular (AC) is for the development of inspection program requirements for the certification of former military aircraft in the experimental category for the purpose(s) of exhibition and air racing that operate in the United States in accordance with Title 14 of the Federal Code of Regulations (14 CFR) part 21, § 21.191(d) and (e). This AC is not mandatory and does not constitute a regulation. This AC describes an acceptable means, but not the only means, for developing inspection program requirements for former military aircraft.

04-12-2013
43-214 AFS-300 Repairs and Alterations to Composite and Bonded Aircraft Structure

This advisory circular (AC) provides information and guidance concerning an acceptable means, but not the only means, of demonstrating compliance with the requirements of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 21, 23, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 43, 91, 121, 125, (U.S.-registered airplanes), 135, 137, and 145 regarding procedures and facilities for repairs and alterations of structure consisting of adhesively bonded (including metal bond) and fiber-reinforced materials (e.g., carbon, aramid, and glass-reinforced polymeric materials mentioned in the current edition of AC 20-107, Composite Aircraft Structure). The information in this AC is applicable to repairs and alterations of bonded and composite structure, whether it is a damaged part that can be removed from the airplane for repairs, or repairs and alterations on the aircraft itself. Examples include repair patches, on-wing bonded repairs, and fabrication and bonding of replacement parts. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will consider any other method of compliance that the applicant elects to present. This AC uses mandatory terms such as "must" only in the sense of ensuring the applicability of these particular methods of compliance when using the acceptable means of compliance (AMC) described herein. This AC does not change regulatory requirements and does not authorize changes in, or deviations from, regulatory requirements.

04-11-2013
61-107B AFS-800 Aircraft Operations at Altitudes Above 25,000 Feet Mean Sea Level or Mach Numbers Greater Than .75

This advisory circular (AC) alerts pilots transitioning from aircraft with less performance capability to complex, high-performance aircraft that are capable of operating at high altitudes and high airspeeds. In particular, this AC stresses special physiological, equipment, and aerodynamic considerations involved in these kinds of operations. It also provides information to aid pilots in becoming familiar with the basic phenomena associated with high-altitude and high-speed flight.

Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61 prescribes the knowledge and skill requirements for the various airman certificates and ratings, including category, class, and type ratings authorized to be placed thereon. The civil aircraft fleet consists of numerous aircraft capable of high-altitude flight. Certain knowledge elements of high-altitude flight are essential for the pilots of these aircraft. As required by 14 CFR § 61.31, pilots who fly at altitudes at or above FL250 in a pressurized aircraft must receive training in the critical factors relating to safe flight operations under those circumstances. These critical elements include knowledge of the special physiological and/or aerodynamic considerations that should be given to highperformance aircraft operating in the high-altitude environment. High-altitude flight has different effects on the human body than those experienced during lower altitude flight. An aircraft's aerodynamic characteristics displayed in high altitude flight may differ significantly from those experienced when penetrating at a lower altitude. Knowledge of and skill in operating high-performance aircraft will enhance the pilot's ability to easily transition into aircraft capable of high speed, high altitude flight.

03-29-2013
00-24C AFS-430 Thunderstorms

This advisory circular (AC) describes the hazards of thunderstorms to aviation and offers guidance to help prevent accidents caused by thunderstorms.

02-19-2013
65-32A AFS-300 Certification of Repairmen (Light-Sport Aircraft)

This advisory circular (AC) provides the public with information regarding the certification of repairmen (light-sport aircraft (LSA)) with maintenance and inspection ratings, the acceptability of training courses, and the continued airworthiness of LSA. The guidance contained in this AC is based on the Final Rule, Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft, which was published in the Federal Register (FR) on July 27,2004. The rule became effective September 1,2004.

02-08-2013
AC 70-2A AJR-22 Reporting of Laser Illumination of Aircraft

 

a. This Advisory Circular (AC) provides information to the aviation community, particularly aircrews operating within the National Airspace System (NAS) on measures taken by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to address incidents of unauthorized illumination of aircraft by lasers. The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, passed into public law on February 14, 2012, established a prohibition against aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft.

b. In addition, this AC provides guidance to aircrews and reflects current guidance for air traffic control (ATC) on the formal reporting of laser illumination incidents. Reporting laser incidents assists law enforcement and provides support for recommended mitigation actions to be taken to ensure continued safe and orderly flight operations.

c. This AC is issued in serious response to the significant increase of unauthorized laser illumination of aircraft incidents, as well as the proliferation and increased sophistication of laser devices available to the general public and other parties. FAA and other governmental studies show the exposure of aircrews to laser illumination may cause hazardous effects (e.g., distraction, glare, afterimage, flash blindness, and, in extreme circumstances, persistent or permanent visual impairment), which could compromise safety by adversely interfering with the ability of aircrews to carry out their responsibilities. ATC regards a laser illumination incident as an in-flight emergency, and will treat them as such, until the aircrew states otherwise.

d. The FAA, in coordination with local law enforcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and other governmental agencies, such as the Department of Homeland Security, Transportation Security Administration (TSA), is taking immediate action to safeguard flights against these unauthorized illuminations and expeditiously locate the source of unauthorized laser transmissions.

02-08-2013
150/5345-42G AAS-100 Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and Accessories

This AC contains the specifications for airport light bases, transformer housings, junction boxes, and accessories. This AC is not intended to be a compilation of currently available product designs. It provides the basic standard requirements for critical dimensions and performance requirements to which all manufacturers must demonstrate compliance.

01-23-2013
35.16-1 ANE-111 Propeller Critical Parts 01-17-2013
145-11A AFS-300 Repair Station Guidance for Compliance with the Safety Agreement between the UnitedStates and the European Union

This advisory circular (AC) provides information and guidance regarding a repair station located in the United States obtaining, renewing, or amending a European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Part-145 approval and an Approved Maintenance Organization (AMO) located within the European Union (EU) obtaining, renewing, or amending a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) repair station certificate under the provisions of the U.S./EU aviation safety agreement (the Agreement).

11-28-2012
45-4 AIR-200 Identification, marking, and placarding of aircraft issued special airworthiness certificates in the light-sport category (S-LSA) and aircraft issued experimental certificates for the purpose of operating light-sport aircraft (E-LSA)

This AC describes an acceptable means, but not the only means, to comply with the requirements for identifying S-LSA and E-LSA with identification (ID) plates, displaying nationality and registration marks, and displaying placards. This AC also provides marking guidance for instruments necessary for the safety of flight.

11-16-2012
120-16F AFS-300 Air Carrier Maintenance Programs

 

This advisory circular (AC) explains what the term "maintenance program" means. Our explanation describes the scope and content of air carrier aircraft maintenance programs. This is important as there is a significant difference between an air carrier maintenance program and an inspection program used in non-air carrier maintenance operations. We explain the background of these programs as well as the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) regulatory requirements. We also describe and explain each of the 10 elements of air carrier maintenance programs. When we use "must" or "will" in this AC, we are referencing actual regulatory requirements. When we use "we," "us," or "our" in this AC, we mean the FAA. When we use "you," "your," or "yours," we mean you, the air carrier. When we use the term "person," it has the same meaning as that in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 1, § 1.1.

11-15-2012
20-165A AIR-130 Airworthiness Approval of Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Systems

 This Advisory Circular (AC) provides guidance for the installation and airworthiness approval of Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Out systems in aircraft.

11-07-2012
120-26K AJV-21 ICAO Aircraft Company Three-LetterIdentifier and/or TelephonyDesignator Assignment and U.S. Special Telephony/Call Signs

Advisory Circular 120-26K defines the criteria and procedures for obtaining an International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) three-letter identifier and/or telephony designator assignment and for obtaining an FAA Special or Local telephony/call sign.

10-31-2012
25-7C ANM-110 Flight Test Guide For Certification Of Transport Category Airplanes

This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance for the flight test evaluation of transport category airplanes. This AC includes flight test methods and procedures to show compliance with the regulations contained in subpart B of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 25, which address airplane performance and handling characteristics. This revision, AC 25-7C, is a complete revision to reduce the number of differences from the European Aviation Safety Agency’s Flight Test Guide, provide acceptable means of compliance for the regulatory changes associated with amendments 107, 109, 113, 115, 119, and 123 to part 25, respond to National Transportation Safety Board recommendations, and to provide a general update to reflect current FAA and industry practices and policies.

10-16-2012
117-2 AFS-220 Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program

 This advisory circular (AC) presents guidelines for developing and implementing a Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program. These guidelines apply to those certificate holders conducting operations under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 117. This AC presents an acceptable means, but not necessarily the only way, that certificate holders may comply with Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program requirements prescribed in part 117, § 117.9. Each 14 CFR part 121 certificate holder conducting operations under part 117 must have an Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program as prescribed in § 117.9. The training program must be designed to increase awareness and understanding of fatigue, the effects of fatigue on pilots and fatigue countermeasures. This AC may also provide valuable information to certificate holders conducting operations other than under part 117 to educate their employees on the effects of fatigue on the safety of flight.

10-11-2012
117-3 AFS-200 Fitness for Duty

This advisory circular (AC) was developed to demonstrate acceptable methods of compliance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 117, § 117.5, Fitness for Duty. While the methods outlined in this AC are not the only means of compliance, the guidance contained herein provides concepts for developing appropriate processes and procedures to comply with § 117.5 and instituting appropriate operator-specific fatigue countermeasures. The guidance also provides a means to educate flightcrew members in the potential of fatigue induced by commuting.

10-11-2012
150/5210-25 AAS-100 Performance Specification for Airport Vehicle Runway Incursion Warning Systems (RIWS)

This AC contains minimum performance specifications for systems and equipment airports use to provide a warning to drivers on an airfield about a potential runway incursion. This AC discusses two types of detection systems: a preconfigured, commercial off the shelf (COTS) system; and a system with custom hardware and software.

09-28-2012

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