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Number Office Title Date
91-67 AFS-820 Minimum Equipment Requirements for General Aviation Operations Under FAR Part 91
Describes acceptable methods for the operation of aircraft under Federal Aviation Regulations Part 91 with certain inoperative instrument and equipment, which are not essential for safe flight.
06-28-1991
91-26 AFS-310 Maintenance and Handling of Airdriven Gyroscopic Instruments
Advises operators of general aviation aircraft of the need for proper maintenance of air-driven gyroscopic instruments and associated air filters.
07-02-1969
91-70 AFS-400 Large AC] Oceanic Operations
Contains information and guidance to be used by operators and pilots planning oceanic flights.
09-06-1994
91-59A AFS-300 Inspection and Care of General Aviation Aircraft Exhaust Systems 07-23-2007
91-50 AFS-820 Importance of Transponder Operation and Altitude Reporting
Provides information and guidance concerning the importance of transponder operation and altitude reporting in the National Airspace System.
08-24-1977
91-42D AFS-310 Hazards of Rotating Propeller and Helicopter Rotor Blades
Updates statistical information on propellers-and rotor-to-person accidents and offers suggestions to reduce the frequency of such accidents.
03-03-1983
91-76A AAM-630 Hazard Associated with Sublimation of Solid Carbon Dioxide (Dry Ice) Aboard Aircraft 05-22-2009
91-46 AFS-350 Gyroscopic Instruments - Good Operating Practices
Issued to re-emphasize to general aviation instrument-rated pilots the need to determine the proper operation of gyroscopic instruments, the importance of instrument crosschecks and proficiency in partial-panel operations.
02-04-1977
91.11-1 AAM-620 Guide to Drug Hazards in Aviation Medicine
Lists all commonly used drugs by pharmacological effect on airmen with side effects and recommendations.
07-19-1963
91-86 AEE-100 Guidance on Carrying Noise Certification Documents On Board Aircraft Operating Outside the United States

a. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is amending its operating rules to require U.S. operators flying outside the United States to carry aircraft noise certification information on board the aircraft.

b. This Advisory Circular (AC) provides guidance to affected U.S. operators that operate aircraft outside the United States with aircraft that were never required to be noise certified. If you have such an aircraft, this AC outlines the noise certification requirement dates so you can confirm that your aircraft indeed pre-dates the requirements and should be considered acceptable. We use the term “grandfathered” for these aircraft. We strongly recommend operators of such aircraft to use the FAA form in Appendix 1 that includes a grandfather clause.

02-23-2010
91-77 AJR-1 General Aviation, Coded Departure Routes (CDR)
Provides guidance to customers of the National Airspace System on the use of Coded Departure Routes. CDRs provide more flexibility for selecting an alternate departure for specific airport when traffic constraint such as thunderstorms, turbulence, and periods of excessive demand exist. Use of a CDR reduces key-entry inputs for controllers and minimizes read-back time between tower staff and pilots, which creates an abbreviated clearance. These abbreviated clearances provide an efficient means for air traffic control (ATC) to provide alternate routes if an airspace constraint occurs.
06-01-2007
91-84 AFS-800 Fractional Ownership Programs
This advisory circular (AC) provides backgroung information, and describes fractional ownership programs and te application process for obtaining management specifications (MSpecs) to operate under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14CFR) part 91 subpart k (part 91K)
03-31-2009
91-82 ACE-100 Fatigue Management Programs for Airplanes with Demonstrated Risk of Catastrophic Failure Due to Fatigue

a. This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance on developing and implementing a Fatigue Management Program (FMP). An applicant may develop an FMP as one method to address the unsafe condition that arises when the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has determined an airplane type design has an unsafe condition associated with a demonstrated risk of catastrophic failure due to fatigue (hereinafter referred to as demonstrated risk). An FMP incorporates damage-tolerance based inspections or a part replacement/modification program to mitigate the demonstrated risk. An FMP also incorporates inspections based on service history and engineering judgment to address the broader risk posed by potential cracking of other fatigue critical structure in the airplane. The FAA may mandate an FMP by Airworthiness Directive (AD) only in cases in which the FAA has determined that airworthiness action is necessary to address an unsafe condition. The FAA may also approve an FMP as an alternative method of compliance (AMOC) to an AD. b. This AC provides guidance for actions once the FAA determines that an AD is necessary to address the unsafe condition associated with a demonstrated risk. Existing FAA guidance supports development of damage-tolerance based inspection programs for transport category airplanes to look proactively for potential cracks. Such guidance includes AC 91-56B, Continuing Structural Integrity Program for Airplanes, and AC 25.571-1C, Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Structure. These existing ACs do not describe all the actions that should be used to address a demonstrated risk. c. This AC is not mandatory and does not constitute a regulation. It describes an acceptable means, but not the only means, for maintaining the continued operational safety for airplane type designs that have a demonstrated risk. However, if you use the means described in this AC, you must follow it in all important aspects. In this AC, we use terms such as “must” or “require” only in the sense of ensuring applicability of a particular method of compliance when you use a specific acceptable method of compliance described herein.

04-29-2008
91-51A AFS-820 Effect of Icing on Aircraft Control and Airplane Deice and Anti-Ice Systems
Provides information for pilots regarding the hazards of aircraft icing and the use of airplane deice and anti-ice systems.
07-19-1996
91-81 AJR-1 Dual J80 Route Procedure
This advisory circular provides information to customers of the National Airspace System (NAS) in regards to the implementation and use of the dual J80 route procedure. The concept of the dual J80 route is to provide a near-term alternative for aircraft that normally file their flight on J80, westbound from New York and Philadelphia area airports. The dual J80 route virtually parallels the current J80 airway. This new procedure will be implemented as an unpublished route available on May 15, 2008. This route will be established and published as a “Q-Route” or Area area Navigation navigation (RNAV) route at a later date. The objective is to provide additional departure capability for westbound aircraft by alleviating constraints associated with airport departure flows that compete for J80, i.e., New York metropolitan and Philadelphia departures, and over flights from points north of the New York area. Current routes through this airspace transit very busy air traffic sectors, and delays are frequently encountered due tobecause of the large volume of aircraft that use these routes everyday. During summer months, these paths can be constrained by thunderstorms and turbulence. New York area departures will benefit from the additional route and increased flexibility, allowing our customers to receive more efficient air traffic services.
05-13-2008
91-56B ANM-115 Continuing Structural Integrity Program for Airplanes
Provides guidance material to manufacturers and operators of transport category airplanes for use in developing a continuing structural integrity program to ensure safe operation of older airplanes throughout their operational lives. This guidance material applies to large transport airplanes which were certified under the fail-safe and fatigue requirements of Civil Air Regulations (CAR) 4b o 14 CFR part 25 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), prior to Amendment 25-45, and which have a maximum gross weight greater than 75,000 pounds. Guidance material on this subject for other transports is provided in AC 91-60. The procedures set forth by this AC are applicable to the large transport category airplanes operated under Subpart D of part 91, and parts 121 and 125.
03-07-2008
91-13C AFS-820 Cold Weather Operation of Aircraft
Provides background and guidelines relating to operation of aircraft in the colder climates where wide temperature changes may occur.
07-24-1979
91-16 AFS-820 Category II Operations - General Aviation Airplanes
Sets forth acceptable means by which Category II operations may be approved in accordance with FAR Parts 23, 25, 61, 91, 97, and 135.
08-07-1967
91-54 AFS-820 Automatic Reporting Systems Altimeter Setting and Other Operational Data
Provides guidelines for the development and installation of automatic reporting systems for altimeter setting and other operational data intended for use in connection with IFR operations.
02-26-1979
91-75 AFS-400 Attitude Indicator
Provides a method to substitute an approved attitude indicator for the rate-of-turn indicator mandated by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 91, section 91.205(d)(3). This AC excludes airplanes covered by section 91.205(d)(3)(i) and (ii). This AC is applicable to part 23-certificated airplanes (or airplanes certificated under earlier equivalent regulations) that weigh less than 12,500 pounds and are operated under part 91.
06-25-2003
91-85 AFS-400 Approval of Aircraft and Operators for flight in Reduced Vertical 08-21-2009
91-14D AFS-340 Altimeter Setting Sources
Provides the aviation public and industry with guidelines for setting up reliable altimeter setting sources.
04-09-1979
91-80 AJR-1 Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC) Hotlines

This advisory circular provides guidance to customers of the National Airspace System (NAS) in regard to the use of and participation on ATCSCC hotlines.

06-24-2008
91-48 AFS-820 Acrobatics-Precision Flying with a Purpose
Provides information to persons who are interested in acrobatic flying to improve their piloting skills as recreation, sport, or as a competitive activity.
06-29-1977
91-61 AFS-800/AAM-500 A Hazard in Aerobatics: Effects of G-Forces of Pilots
Provides background information on G-forces, their effect on the human body and their role in safe flying, and offers suggestions for avoiding problems caused by acceleration encountered in aerobatic maneuvers.
02-28-1984
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