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DOMESTIC/INTERNATIONAL May 21, 2020

Section 2
International Oceanic Airspace Notices

Introduction

The following information contains the most current notices involving airspace matters pertaining to U.S. internationally delegated airspace. The information provided is divided into two sections: General and Region Specific.

General

Communications Requirements in Oceanic Airspace Delegated to the FAA for Provision of Air Traffic Services

  1. The United States Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP), (section ENR 7.1, paragraph 6) describes satellite voice (SatVoice) communications services available in Anchorage, New York and Oakland oceanic control areas (OCAs), along with the requirements for use of those services. The AIP currently allows use of suitably installed and operated SatVoice to communicate with New York and San Francisco Radio only "when unable to communicate on HF" (High Frequency) radio. Some questions have arisen as to what constitutes being "unable" to communicate on HF.
  2. Anchorage, New York and Oakland OCAs are "high seas" (international) airspace (for U.S. operators, 14 CFR § 91.703 refers). Therefore, all operations therein must comply with ICAO Annex 2 (Rules of the Air), which requires that aircraft "maintain continuous air-ground voice communication watch on the appropriate communication channel…" (Paragraph 3.6.5.1). This means that a long-range communication system (LRCS) is required whenever operations will exceed the range of VHF voice communications between aircraft and air traffic control. Additionally, regulations issued by the State of Registry/ State of the Operator may stipulate how many LRCS are required. Examples of such regulations, for U.S. operators, include 14 CFR §§ 91.511, 121.351, 125.203 and 135.165.
  3. A flight crew is considered to be "unable to communicate on HF" during poor HF propagation conditions (commonly referred to as "HF Blackouts"), or if there is an inflight HF radio failure. In those cases, that flight crew can use AIP-compliant SatVoice equipment and procedures to continue the flight to destination. A one-time return flight through Anchorage, New York and Oakland OCAs, to obtain maintenance on the HF radios, would also be acceptable under these circumstances, and would meet the criteria for use of SatVoice with New York and San Francisco Radio as per the AIP. Operators must still comply with applicable regulations on how many LRCS are required, as well as with applicable Minimum Equipment List (MEL) provisos.
  4. When first establishing communications with New York or San Francisco Radio via SatVoice, the flight crew should request a "callback check." Such a check will help ensure Radio can contact the crew during the period of SatVoice use. The table below illustrates a sample callback check. Additionally, in the event the operator has indicated capability for SatVoice via both Iridium and Inmarsat (by listing codes M1 and M3 in Item 10 of the ATC flight plan), the flight crew should inform the Radio operator of the service to use for communicating with the aircraft.

    Sample Transcript of SatVoice Callback Check

    SatVoice call from the air:

    "New York RADIO, Airline 123, request SatVoice callback check."
    For aircraft equipped with both Inmarsat and Iridium:
    "… on Inmarsat/Iridium (as applicable)"

    Answer from the ground:

    "Airline 123, copy, terminating call, will call you right back"

    New SatVoice call from ground:

    "Airline 123, New York Radio with your SatVoice callback, how do you read?"

    SatVoice answer from the air:

    "Loud and clear, SatVoice callback check good, good day!"

  5. FAA point of contact: Aviation Safety Inspector Kevin C. Kelley, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, 202-267-8854, Kevin.C.Kelley@faa.gov.

(Flight Operations Group, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, Flight Standards Service, 7/18/2019)

Region Specific

Special Emphasis Items for Operations on North Atlantic Tracks/Routes Employing Reduced Aircraft Separation

The ICAO North Atlantic (NAT) region has implemented reduced aircraft separation, both longitudinally and laterally, between appropriately equipped and qualified aircraft. A trial of further reduced lateral separation began in October 2019 between ADS-B equipped aircraft flying in the NAT.

The purpose of this notice is to alert U.S. operators to a number of NAT OPS Bulletins published by the ICAO Europe/North Atlantic region office. (Anyone planning to fly across the NAT should read and become very familiar with the information contained in ALL current NAT OPS Bulletins.) The bulletins provide information on aircraft equipment and aircrew qualification requirements for taking advantage of the tracks and routes where air traffic controllers use reduced aircraft separation minimums. The bulletins also contain special emphasis items that should be part of aircrew training and operating procedures to enhance safety of operations in the NAT.

The bulletins most relevant to operations under reduced aircraft separation minimums are as follows:

Number 2019_006 Trial Implementation of ASEPS (Lateral) Using ADS-B

Number 2018_005 Special Procedures for In-flight Contingencies in Oceanic Airspace

Number 2018_004 Implementation of Performance Based Separation Minima-Expanded Publication of PBCS OTS

Number 2018_003 Waypoint Insertion/Verification Special Emphasis Items

Special emphasis items covered in these bulletins include:

To reiterate, operators are strongly encouraged to review all the current NAT OPS Bulletins and include relevant information in their training programs and normal oceanic procedures. Use the information in the bulletins hand in hand with the information published in the U.S. Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP).

Note: The emphasis items contained in bulletin 2018_003 are of value to safe operations in any oceanic airspace. ALL operators should provide the information contained therein to their oceanic flight crews.

Operators may find the bulletins on the ICAO EUR/NAT website (https://www.icao.int/EURNAT/Pages/welcome.aspx), then selecting EUR/NAT Documents, then NAT Documents, and then NAT OPS Bulletins.

(Flight Operations Group, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, Flight Standards Service, 01/02/20)

NORTH ATLANTIC DATA LINK MANDATE

MARCH 2020 UPDATE

1. Introduction.

a. This notice updates operators on the status of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) North Atlantic (NAT) region Data Link Mandate (DLM). The comprehensive source of information and guidance on the DLM is NAT OPS Bulletin 2017-1 (Revision 4) NAT Common DLM AIC, issued July 9, 2019. That bulletin is available free of charge at the ICAO Europe/North Atlantic region office website, under EUR & NAT Documents > NAT Documents > NAT Ops Bulletins. All U.S. operators intending flights in the NAT region should familiarize themselves with all the current NAT Ops Bulletins, and update operations manuals and training materials as applicable.

b. The NAT OPS Bulletin identifies specific airspace within the NAT region and specific types of flights that are exempt from the mandate. (Notably, the entire New York Oceanic CTA/FIR is exempt from the mandate.) Otherwise, as of January 30, 2020 all aircraft operating between FL 290 to FL 410 inclusive, throughout the ICAO North Atlantic region, must be equipped with operable FANS 1/A (or equivalent) CPDLC and ADS-C equipment.

2. Contingency Procedures. NAT OPS Bulletin 2017-1 provides procedures pilots should use in the event of data link equipment failure prior to and after departure, as well failures after entering DLM airspace. Aircraft separation standards within DLM airspace are based on fully operational data link equipment. Pilots must promptly notify ATC of any data link equipment failures prior to entering or while in DLM airspace.

3. U.S. Operator Authorization to Use FANS 1/A (or equivalent) Data Link Systems.

a. U.S. operators intending to fly in NAT DLM airspace must have been issued operational authorization via Operations Specification, Management Specification or Letter of Authorization (as appropriate) A056 Data Link Communications. Advisory Circular (AC) 90-117 Data Link Communications provides guidance on operational use, aircraft eligibility, minimum performance and services of communication service providers, performance monitoring, training requirements, and discrepancy reporting related to the use of data link communication systems.

b. Operators may also find helpful the information posted in the "FAA NAT Resource Guide for U.S. Operators," under the Comm/Nav/Surveillance, Data Link Communications sections. Operators can find the resource guide at the following address:

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afx/afs/afs400/afs410/media/NAT.pdf

4. Contacts.

a. Aviation Safety Inspector Mark Patterson, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, 202-267-8848, Mark.Patterson@faa.gov.

b. Aviation Safety Inspector Madison Walton, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, 202-267-8850, Madison.Walton@faa.gov.

c. Senior Aviation Analyst Mark Wisniewski (SAIC), Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, 202-267-8843, Mark.ctr.Wisniewski@faa.gov.

(Flight Operations Group, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, Flight Standards Service, March 2020)

Special Notice -- NAT ATS Message Format

The following is submitted in an effort to standardize ATS message formats for air/ground communications in the North Atlantic (NAT) Region:

  1. General
    1. All NAT air−ground messages are categorized under one of the following headings (excluding emergency messages):
      1. Position Request.
      2. Request Clearance.
      3. Revised Estimate.
      4. Miscellaneous Message.
    2. In order to enable ground stations to process messages in the shortest possible time, pilots should observe the following rules:
      1. Use the correct type of message applicable to the data transmitted.
      2. State the message type on the contact call to the ground station or at the start of the message.
      3. Adhere strictly to the sequence of information for the type of message.
      4. All times in each of the messages should be expressed in hours and minutes.
  2. Description of ATS Message Types. Aircraft should transmit air−ground messages using standard RTF phraseology in accordance with the following:
    1. POSITION. To be used for routine position reportsContent and Data Sequence
      1. "POSITION."
      2. Flight identification.
      3. Present Position.
      4. Time over present position (hours and minutes).
      5. Present flight level.
      6. Next on assigned route.
      7. Estimated time for next position (hours and minutes).
      8. Next subsequent position.
      9. Any further information; e.g., MET data or Company message.

        EXAMPLE−
        "Position, SWISSAIR 100, 56N 010W 1235, flight level 330, estimating 56N 020W 1310, next 56N 030W"

         

    2. REQUEST CLEARANCE
      1. To be used, in conjunction with a routine position report, to request a change of mach number, flight level, or route and to request westbound oceanic clearance prior to entering Reykjavik, Santa Maria or Shanwick CTAs.Content and Data Sequence
        1. "REQUEST CLEARANCE."
        2. Flight identification.
        3. Present or last reported position.
        4. Time over present or last reported position (hours and minutes).
        5. Present flight level.
        6. Next position on assigned route or oceanic entry point.
        7. Estimate for next position or oceanic entry point.
        8. Next subsequent position,
        9. Requested Mach number, flight level or route.
        10. Further information or clarifying remarks.

          EXAMPLE−
          "Request clearance, TWA 801, 56N 020W 1245, flight level 330, estimating 56N 030W 1320, next 56N 040W, requesting flight level 350"

           

      2. To be used to request a change in Mach number, flight level, or route when a position report message is not appropriate.Content and Data Sequence
        1. "REQUEST CLEARANCE."
        2. Flight identification.
        3. Requested Mach number, flight level or route.
        4. Further information or clarifying remarks.

          EXAMPLE−
          "Request clearance, BAW 212, requesting flight level 370"

           

    3. REVISED ESTIMATE. To be used to update estimate for next position.Content and Data Sequence
      1. "Revised Estimate."
      2. Flight Identification.
      3. Next position on route.
      4. Revised estimate for next position (hours and minutes).
      5. Further information.

        EXAMPLE−
        "Revised estimate, WDA 523, 57N 040W 0325"

    4. MISCELLANEOUS. To be used to pass information or make a request in plain language that does not conform with the content of other message formats. No message designator is required as this will be inserted by the ground station.Content and Data Sequence
      1. Flight identification.
      2. General information or request in plain language and format free.

(ZNY, Updated 5/24/2018)

Gulf of Mexico RNAV Routes Q100, Q102, and Q105

This NOTAM defines RNAV equipment requirements for operators filing Q100, Q102, and Q105 through Gulf of Mexico airspace. Only aircraft approved for IFR Area Navigation operations will be cleared to operate on Q100, Q102, and Q105 between the surface and FL600 (inclusive).

Operator Determination of RNAV Equipment Eligibility

In accordance with Federal Aviation Regulations 91.511, 121.351, 125.203, and 135.165 (as applicable) an approved Long-Range Navigation System (INS, IRS, GPS or Loran C) is required for operation on these routes.

In addition, operators will not flight plan or operate on these routes unless their aircraft are equipped with RNAV systems that are approved for IFR navigation and the pilots are qualified to operate them. Aircraft may be considered eligible to operate on these routes if they fall under one of the following categories:

  1. For new installations, the Airplane Flight Manual must show that the navigation system installation has received airworthiness approval in accordance with one of the following FAA ACs:
    1. AC 20-138, as amended (Airworthiness Approval of Positioning and Navigation Systems).
    2. AC 25-15 (Flight Management System [FMS] approval).
  2. Installations that have previously received airworthiness approval under the following ACs are eligible for Gulf of Mexico Q-route operation provided it is shown in the Airplane Flight Manual:
    1. AC 90-45A (RNAV system approval).
    2. AC 20-130, as amended (Multi-Sensor Navigation system approval).

      NOTE-
      INS LIMITATIONS. See paragraph 6, below.

Operational Requirements and Procedures

  1. Class I Navigation: operations on Q100, Q102 and Q105 will continue to be categorized as Class I navigation, as defined in FAA Order 8900.1, Vol. 4, Chapter 1, Section 3, Class I Navigation.
  2. Operations Specifications: operators are considered eligible to conduct operations on the Q-routes provided that aircraft are equipped with the appropriate equipment in accordance with the "Operator Determination of RNAV Equipment Eligibility" paragraph above and operations are conducted in accordance with paragraph (3), (4), (5) and (6) below. Title 14 CFR Parts 121, 125, 135 operators are authorized to operate on the Q-routes when they are issued Operations Specifications (OpSpecs) paragraph B034 (Class I Navigation Using Area Navigation Systems). In addition, OpSpecs B034 must be annotated in OpSpecs paragraph B050 (Enroute Authorizations, Limitations and Procedures), for the Gulf of Mexico High Offshore Airspace.
  3. Pilots in command filing on RNAV routes are certifying that the crews and equipment are qualified to conduct RNAV operations.
  4. Pilots in command must be responsible for navigating along route centerline (as defined by the aircraft navigation system) in accordance with the requirements of Title 14 CFR 91, section 181 (course to be flown) and ICAO Annex 2, paragraph 3.6.2.1.1. (Annex 2, paragraph 3.6.2.1 states that flights must "in so far as practical, when on an established ATS route, operate on the defined centerline of that route.")
  5. Pilots in command must notify the Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) of any loss of navigation capability that affects the aircraft’s ability to navigate within the lateral limits of the route.
  6. INS or IRS LIMITATION. For the purposes of operating on the following RNAV routes, Q100, Q102, and Q105, aircraft equipped with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) or Inertial Reference Systems (IRS) that cannot receive automatic position updates (e.g., DME/DME update) for the entire length of the route, are limited to 1.5 consecutive hours of un-updated operation. In preparation for take-off, this time starts at the time that the INS or IRS is placed in the navigation mode. En route, the maximum time allowed between automatic position updates is 1.5 hours. Systems that perform updating after the pilot has manually selected the navigation aid are considered to have "automatic update" capability.
  7. Radar monitoring will normally be provided. In the event of loss of radar, aircraft will be advised. ATC will ensure that the appropriate nonradar separation is applied during these time periods.

FAA Contacts

Name

Phone

Email

Scott Leis

202-267-3641

Scott.leis@faa.gov

Rudolph Lawrence

202-267-0116

Rudolph.lawrence@faa.gov

(Flight Operations Group, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, Flight Standards Service, 3/26/20)

North Atlantic Trial Implementation of ASEPS (Lateral) Using ADS-B

The ICAO North Atlantic (NAT) region is conducting trials of reduced aircraft separation minimums based on the use of ADS-B. The NAT region officially refers to these aircraft separation minimums as Advanced Surveillance-Enhanced Procedural Separation (ASEPS). The trials, conducted exclusively in the Gander, Shanwick and Santa Maria Oceanic Control Areas (OCA), began in March 2019 with reduced longitudinal separation minimums. The NAT region will expand the trials to include reduced lateral separation minimums, again only in Gander, Shanwick and Santa Maria OCAs, beginning as early as October 10, 2019. During the trials, the participating OCAs may separate aircraft on non-intersecting tracks not less than 19 nautical miles (NM) laterally. Aircraft currently flying on Performance Based Communications and Surveillance (PBCS) tracks in the NAT region can experience lateral spacing limited to 23 NM.

Air traffic controllers for the Gander and Shanwick OCAs will use space based ADS-B for aircraft surveillance during the trials, while controllers for Santa Maria OCA will use their existing ground-based ADS-B network.

As with the PBCS tracks, ATC will limit application of reduced lateral spacing to aircraft whose flight plan indicates authorization for RNP 4, RCP 240, RSP 180, RVSM, and operations in the North Atlantic High Level Airspace (NAT HLA). The flight plan must also indicate equipage with ADS-B out (1090 MHz) (Item 10 codes B1 or B2) and FANS 1/A CPDLC SATCOM (Item 10 codes J5 or J7).

ICAO NAT OPS Bulletin 2019-002 Trial Implementation of ASEPS (Lateral) Using ADS-B is the comprehensive source of guidance and information on the trials. Operators may find this OPS Bulletin, as well as all active NAT OPS Bulletins at www.icao.int/EURNAT. Subsequently click on EUR/NAT Documents, then NAT Region Documents, then NAT OPS Bulletins.

Flight crews crossing the NAT may experience some new and/or non-standard terminology regarding surveillance of their aircraft, particularly as they enter or travel between trial participating OCAs. Regardless of the surveillance status terminology that flight crews hear or receive via CPDLC when in oceanic airspace, they must perform all their normal oceanic procedures.

The FAA recommends flight crews of U.S. aircraft opt out of the ASEPS reduced lateral separation trial if flying with less than a fully functioning TCAS (ACAS II). Flight crews should inform ATC that they have "no ACAS" either when requesting their oceanic clearance (voice or CPDLC), 30 minutes prior to crossing the Gander, Shanwick or Santa Maria OCA boundaries if entering from New York or Iceland oceanic airspace, or otherwise as soon as possible if ACAS failure occurs while in Gander, Shanwick or Santa Maria OCAs.

Strategic Lateral Offset Procedures (SLOP) remain in effect during ASEPS trials. For safety of operations, flight crews should always use SLOP while within oceanic airspace on their NAT crossing.

Operators who fly across the North Atlantic should ensure their pilots are aware of the reduced lateral separation trials and the information presented in both this notice and NAT OPS Bulletin 2019-002.

For questions regarding this notice contact the Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, 202-267-8790.

(Flight Operations Group, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, Flight Standards Service, 8/15/19)

NORTH ATLANTIC OPERATIONS WITHOUT AN ASSIGNED FIXED SPEED

  1. The purpose of the notice is to alert operators flying in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) North Atlantic (NAT) region of opportunities to fly other than a fixed speed. A speed assignment has long been a component of a NAT oceanic clearance. As a result of extensive coordination among NAT air navigation service providers (ANSP), operators may now have the opportunity to fly a variable speed, for all or a portion of their NAT oceanic crossing. NAT ANSPs are implementing operations without an assigned fixed speed as changes to their individual flight data processing systems and procedures allow. Therefore, the opportunities to fly other than a fixed speed will vary with the oceanic control area, traffic density, and direction of flight.
  2. ICAO NAT OPS Bulletin 2019-1 Operations Without an Assigned Fixed Speed in the NAT (OWAFS) Special Emphasis Items (SEI), issued July 9, 2019, is the comprehensive source of information on operations without an assigned fixed speed in the NAT. The bulletin includes an example operational scenario illustrating how a nominal oceanic flight crew may obtain clearance to fly other than a fixed assigned speed in the NAT. It is important to note that, in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, § 91.703, operators must observe the provisions of paragraph 3.6.2.2 of ICAO Annex 2. Operators should not interpret anything in the bulletin as authorizing a deviation from Annex 2.
  3. Operators can obtain this bulletin, as well as all NAT OPS Bulletins, free of charge on the ICAO EUR/NAT website. Visitors to the website should select EUR/NAT Documents, then NAT Documents, then NAT OPS Bulletins to view the complete list of effective bulletins. All U.S. operators intending flights in the NAT region should familiarize themselves with all current NAT OPS Bulletins.
  4. Operators may direct questions to Aviation Safety Inspector Madison Walton, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, at 202-267-8850, or Madison.Walton@faa.gov.(Flight Operations Group, Flight Technologies and Procedures Division, Flight Standards Service, 9/12/2019)Operations of Aircraft without Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) Out in U.S. ADS-B Out Rule Airspace (Outside 48 Contiguous States)Purpose: To describe FAA Air Traffic policy for aircraft operations without Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast Out (ADS-B Out) in United States sovereign airspace outside of the 48 Contiguous States.Pursuant to 14 CFR § 91.225, when operating in Class A airspace an aircraft must:
    1. Meet the performance requirements in TSO-C166b, Extended Squitter Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) and Traffic Information Service-Broadcast (TIS-B) Equipment Operating on the Radio Frequency of 1090 Megahertz (MHz); and,
    2. Meet the requirements of 14 CFR § 91.227.

For the purposes of § 91.225, Class A airspace is located within U.S. domestic airspace. U.S. domestic airspace exists over all land mass regions of the U.S. as defined in 14 CFR § 1.1 and includes the States (contiguous and non-contiguous), the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the possessions, including the surrounding territorial waters.

NOTE-
Areas beyond 12 nautical miles from the U.S. coastline are considered part of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) airspace. U.S. airspace regulations do not apply in these areas even if the FAA opts to apply domestic air traffic procedures.

Several U.S. territories in the Pacific and Caribbean region have Class A airspace defined over them. Per the Department of the Interior, Insular Affairs Policy Division, the U.S. possessions, or territories, in the Pacific and Caribbean regions include the following:

Caribbean: Navassa Island, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands

Pacific: American Samoa, Baker Island, Guam, Howland Island, Jarvis Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Midway Atoll, Northern Mariana Islands, Palmyra Atoll, Wake Atoll.

For flight operations within the Class A domestic airspace of Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands south of latitude North 17 degrees 49 minutes, the FAA notes the following expectations:

1. Operators without equipment meeting the performance requirements in TSO-C166b are expected to plan their routes of flight (including alternate airports) around this airspace; and

2. Operators without equipment meeting the performance requirements in TSO-C166b should train their flight crews to generally decline a voluntary ATC rerouting through this airspace unless required to safely operate their aircraft (e.g., in-flight emergencies, weather deviations, or diversions, etc.), advising ATC that they are not equipped with appropriate ADS-B avionics. If, however, ATC chooses to proceed with the new routing, the flight crew should accept and execute the clearance.

The remaining locations in the Pacific and Caribbean regions do not have FAA ADS-B or radar coverage at this time. The specific locations within the Pacific and Caribbean regions without coverage are: American Samoa, Baker Island, Howland Island, Jarvis Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Midway Atoll, Palmyra Atoll, Navassa Island, and the Northern Mariana Islands north of latitude North 17 degrees 49 minutes.

In airspace without FAA ADS-B or radar coverage, the FAA cannot provide (and does not provide) Air Traffic Service (ATS) surveillance services. Also, without ADS-B coverage, FAA has no practical means to detect violations of § 91.225. Therefore, until such coverage exists, FAA does not anticipate devoting its resources to identifying non-equipped aircraft briefly traversing these locations without FAA ADS-B or radar coverage.

(AJV-1, 10/10/2019)

Trial to Remove Flight planning requirement of
Eastbound North American Routes (NAR)

Background

For several decades, eastbound aircraft transitioning from North America to Europe have been required to flight plan a North American Route (NAR) with the associated oceanic entry point (OEP) of their preferred oceanic track, as outlined in the U.S. Northeast Chart Supplement and Canada Flight Supplement (CFS).

Given the desire from operators to have the ability to flight plan more efficiently and optimize their routings, NAV CANADA and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have embarked on a project to remove this flight-planning requirement on a trial basis, as outlined below.

Trial Details

Beginning in January 2020, departures from several North American cities will have the ability to optimize their routings to the OEP. This will be a gradual introduction of departure points and operators as the trial moves forward in five stages. Additional departure airports may be considered as the trial moves forward and the impact of the change has been adequately evaluated.

Note: At all times, in every stage, departures must still comply with any departure routes, structures, and/or restrictions from the departure airport. Optimized routings can only begin from points within the Boston air route traffic control center (ARTCC), Moncton flight information region (FIR) airspace or both. Once inside the Boston ARTCC/Moncton FIR area, random routings to the OEP will be permitted. Flight paths of aircraft participating in the trial must remain at or north of a VITOL-LOMPI line. The daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory must be the primary method of communicating specifics of this trial.

Stage Number

Date

Description

Stage 1

6 January 2020 to
19 January 2020

All flights operated by Air Canada, departing from CYYZ and CYUL, operating within the organized track structure (OTS) will not be required to file the associated NAR listed on the daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory. Associated NARs are referenced under the "JFK Departures" section of the advisory.

Stage 2

20 January 2020 to
2 February 2020

All flights departing from CYYZ and CYUL, operating within the OTS, will not be required to file the associated NAR listed on the daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory. Associated NARs are referenced under the "JFK Departures" section of the advisory.

Stage 3

3 February 2020 to
16 February 2020

All flights as indicated in Stage 1 and Stage 2 in addition to American airlines flights departing from KORD, operating within the OTS will not be required to file the associated NAR listed on the daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory. Associated NARs are referenced under the "JFK Departures" section of the advisory.

Stage 4

17 February 2020 to
1 March 2020

All flights departing from CYYZ, CYUL and KORD, operating within the OTS will not be required to file the associated NAR listed on the daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory. Associated NARs are referenced under the "JFK Departures" section of the advisory.

Stage 5

2 March 2020 to
16 March 2020

All flights departing from CYYZ, CYUL, KORD, KDTW and KMSP, operating within the OTS will not be required to file the associated NAR listed on the daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory. Associated NARs are referenced under the "JFK Departures" section of the advisory.

ICAO NOTAMS will be issued in conjunction with each stage of this trial.

The trial may be discontinued at any time, based on the operational impact of the trial. If the trial is discontinued, dispatchers and operators must revert back to the OTS structure. Please refer to the daily ZBW North Atlantic Advisory for specific information and status of this trial.

Dispatchers must include "NO NARS EAST TRIAL" in the remarks section of flight plans for participating aircraft.

Flight crews are expected to carry applicable NAR documentation on the flight deck for all flights, regardless if participating in the trial or not.

For further information, please contact:

Steve Schmidt

Traffic Management Officer, Boston District

35 Northeastern Blvd.

Nashua, NH 03062

Office.:1-603-879-6033

Operations:1-603-879-6666

Support:1-603-879-6808

E-mail:s.gunther.schmidt@faa.gov

NAV CANADA
Customer Service
77 Metcalfe Street
Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

Tel.: 800-876-4693
Fax: 877-663-6656
E-mail:service@navcanada.ca

(01/02/2020)