Application Process for Medical Certification - Examination Techniques
Item 46. Neurologic

A neurologic evaluation should consist of a thorough review of the applicant's history prior to the neurological examination. The Examiner should specifically inquire concerning a history of weakness or paralysis, disturbance of sensation, loss of coordination, or loss of bowel or bladder control. Certain laboratory studies, such as scans and imaging procedures of the head or spine, electroencephalograms, or spinal paracentesis may suggest significant medical history. The Examiner should note conditions identified in Item 60 on the application with facts, such as dates, frequency, and severity of occurrence.

A history of simple headaches without sequela is not disqualifying. Some require only temporary disqualification during periods when the headaches are likely to occur or require treatment. Other types of headaches may preclude certification by the Examiner and require special evaluation and consideration (e.g., migraine and cluster headaches).

One or two episodes of dizziness or even fainting may not be disqualifying. For example, dizziness upon suddenly arising when ill is not a true dysfunction. Likewise, the orthostatic faint associated with moderate anemia is no threat to aviation safety as long as the individual is temporarily disqualified until the anemia is corrected.

An unexplained disturbance of consciousness is disqualifying under the medical standards. Because a disturbance of consciousness may be expected to be totally incapacitating, individuals with such histories pose a high risk to safety and must be denied or deferred by the Examiner. If the cause of the disturbance is explained and a loss of consciousness is not likely to recur, then medical certification may be possible.

The basic neurological examination consists of an examination of the
12 cranial nerves, motor strength, superficial reflexes, deep tendon reflexes, sensation, coordination, mental status, and includes the Babinski reflex and Romberg sign. The Examiner should be aware of any asymmetry in responses because this may be evidence of mild or early abnormalities. The Examiner should evaluate the visual field by direct confrontation or, preferably, by one of the perimetry procedures, especially if there is a suggestion of neurological deficiency.