Foreign aircraft may fly in the U.S. if they have an airworthiness certificate equivalent to a U.S. standard airworthiness certificate. Otherwise, they require a Special Flight Authorization (SFA) as described in 14 CFR 91.715.

To apply for a SFA, contact one of FAA�s Flight Standards Divisions or Aircraft Certification Directorates.

Exception: Operators of Canadian amateur-built aircraft and basic and advanced ultralight aeroplanes do not need to contact the FAA, but may use the forms provided here.

Streamlined SFA for Canadian Amateur-Built Aircraft

To qualify for this authorization, pilots must hold at least a Canadian Private Pilot License and agree to abide by the terms of the authorization. If you agree click below for the authorization.

I agree to the above (PDF)

Streamlined SFA for Canadian Advanced Ultralight Aeroplanes

To qualify for this authorization, pilots must abide by the terms of the authorization and hold one of the following:

  • Canadian Private Pilot License, Aeroplanes
  • Canadian Recreational Pilot Permit, Recreational, Aeroplane
  • Canadian Pilot Permit, Ultralight-Aeroplane, endorsed with a Flight Instructor rating. In addition to this permit, the pilot must also have logged 2 hours cross-country flight time, endorsed by an authorized instructor.

If you agree click below for the authorization.
I agree to the above (PDF)

Operating U.S. Amateur-Built Aircraft in Canada Similarly, Transport Canada authorizes U.S. Amateur-built aircraft to operate in Canada under the terms of its Standardised Validation of a Special Airworthiness Certificate-Experimental, for the purpose of operating a United States-Registered amateur-built aircraft in Canadian airspace (PDF).

For more information, visit http://www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/maintenance/aarpe/Recreational/menu.htm.