23. Q: Is jet fuel being dumped over residences? A resident of Park Ridge stated that there were pockmarks on his house that could only have been caused by jet fuel.

22. Q: Why is this project moving forward, especially with air travel down and without a need for more runways at this time?

21. Q: Are there other airports in metropolitan areas with parallel runway spacing?

20. Q What are the distances between the three runways on the north side of the airport, the ones that are directly west of Park Ridge?

19. Q: Has this rule (see question 18) been relaxed so you can move forward with the OMP?

18. Q: What are FAA's separation standards for two planes while in flight and while on final approach? I base my question on the re-configuration of the east to west approach patterns and the apparent close (wing tip to wing tip) separation allowed on final approach.

17. Q: I am writing a paper about the OMP for my Transportation Engineering Class and I wanted to know how expanding O'Hare Airport will increase capacity?

16. Q: I was trying to access the approved airport plans for the O'Hare Modernization Plan. I was interested to know if the location of Runway 9C/27C has changed since the plan was approved. It is my understanding that the centerline of Runway 9C/27C on the plan is located 1607 feet north of the centerline of existing Runway 9R/27L. We are considering purchasing a new home in Park Ridge and would like to know where the flight path will be for the yet-to-be built runway.

15. Q: Will the FAA meet with residents?

14. Q: There has also been some information about the forest preserve just to the west of Maine South High School being an emergency landing area for the airport. Can you confirm this information?

13. Q: What are the FAA guidelines with regard to flight safety altitudes? 600 ft above my school/house just doesn't seem to me to meet the guidelines concerning the safety of those on the ground.

12. Q: Have you heard of any yellow goo falling on the neighborhoods?

11. Q: What is the definition of the "Point of No Return" as it relates to crash paths and which runways are used? Which runways at ORD are designated as Crash Site runways?

10. Q: What emergency procedures are in place if an aircraft states that it is in distress? Which runways are used or preferred for landings when an aircraft is distressed, in danger or otherwise compromised. Are certain runways used than others during such conditions? If so, which?

9. Q: Cook County did not take the aircraft noise into consideration when they revised my property value. Who do I talk to having it modified?

8. Q: Can kites be flown near the airport (i.e. in Park Ridge)?

7. Q: Who do I talk to for help on my concerns?

6. Q: What commercial or financial benefit is Park Ridge receiving for allowing all the travelers to use surrounding communities, such as Rosemont or Bensenville?

5. Q: The support for the OMP is rapidly waning. The airlines recently tried to back out of it because they cannot afford it and see no sense in it during a time when air travel is declining for a variety of reasons.

4. Q: If the information we get from ONCC is incorrect, what is the point of participating? Shouldn't the FAA and the City of Chicago be concerned about their credibility with the airport's neighbors and more importantly, shouldn't the participating communities be concerned?

3. Q: What about safety? Is it possible and that more over flights of Park Ridge make it more likely that a crash will occur? Doesn't the added capacity at O'Hare make this even more likely?

2. Q: Why is O’Hare building new runways?

1. Q: When did the north Runway 9L/27R open?

23. Q: Is jet fuel being dumped over residences? A resident of Park Ridge stated that there were pockmarks on his house that could only have been caused by jet fuel.
FAA Response: It is extremely rare that aircraft need to dump fuel. If the need arises, aircraft are instructed by Air Traffic Control to dump fuel at high altitudes as far away from the airport or any populated areas as possible.

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22. Q: Why is this project moving forward, especially with air travel down and without a need for more runways at this time?
FAA Response: ORD is owned and operated by the City of Chicago (Sponsor). The FAA has identified ORD as a major contributor to delays throughout the NAS. The FAA has determined that a capacity and delay problem exists at ORD, and that one of the major causes of the delay is inadequate all-weather airfield capacity due to the airfield's current configuration (see Chapter 2 of the Final EIS). The essence of the O'Hare Modernization is to correct the inherent inefficiencies created by the original runway triangle built when O'Hare was Orchard Place. The Mayor of Chicago announced a concept to enhance the capacity and efficiency of O'Hare and reduce delay, which evolved into the OMP. The resulting airfield would resemble those at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International and Dallas/Fort Worth International airports, where recent advances in air traffic control technology for parallel runway operations have been incorporated. The City of Chicago's proposal with its six parallel runways, breaks the O'Hare "runway triangle" and allows for far more operations in all weather conditions without compromising safety.

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21. Q: Are there other airports in metropolitan areas with parallel runway spacing?
FAA Response: Many airports in large metropolitan areas were built, or are being expanded or modified, to operate with parallel runway configurations that allow the airport operator and Air Traffic to provide safe and efficient operations. Other major commercial airports in the US have similar runway layouts, with similar operations. Examples include Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. At Atlanta, the separation between the northern pair of parallel runways is 1,000 feet and the separation between the southern pair of runways is approximately 1,050 feet. At Dallas-Fort Worth, the separation between the western pair of parallel runways is approximately 1,000 feet and the separation between the eastern pair of runways is 1,200 feet. Closely spaced parallel runways exist across the US

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20. Q: What are the distances between the three runways on the north side of the airport, the ones that are directly west of Park Ridge?
FAA Response: Existing Runway 9L/27R (commissioned in November 2008) is 6,900 feet away from Runway 9R/27L. Future Runway 9C/27C will be over 5,200 feet away from 9L/27R and over 1,600 feet from 9R/27L. Please refer to the exhibit referenced in Q 18 to see how these runways will be operated.

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19. Q: Has this rule (see question 18) been relaxed so you can move forward with the OMP??
FAA Response: This rule has not been relaxed in order to move forward with the O'Hare Modernization Program.

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18. Q: What are FAA's separation standards for two planes while in flight and while on final approach? I base my question on the re-configuration of the east to west approach patterns and the apparent close (wing tip to wing tip) separation allowed on final approach.
FAA Response: FAA's separation standards vary for different segments of flight and in and around an airport. �� Separation standards include three dimensions: lateral (wing tip to wing tip), vertical (the varying altitude of the aircraft), and in-trail (tail of one plane to the nose of the plane behind it). These standards vary based on aircraft type and speed, and runway geometry.
For simultaneous parallel instrument approaches with the existing surveillance (radar) systems in operation at O'Hare, two parallel runways must be separated by 4,300 feet and three parallel runways must each be 5,000 feet apart. Only runways that meet or exceed the required separations will be used for simultaneous parallel approaches.
To allow for more efficient airport operations, runways are built closer than 4,300 feet apart at airports all over the country. Efficiency is achieved by using some runways solely for arrivals and others for departures. See Exhibit D-4 as referenced below for a depiction of how the runways are used for arriving and departing aircraft at O'Hare.
Activation of Runway 10C/28C will result in airspace changes that will alter how the airfield is
used. The flow of planes in and out of O'Hare will change to a predominant East-West flow. In
general over the course of a year, the majority of the time (about 70 percent) O'Hare will be in a

West Flow air traffic pattern, with aircraft arriving from the east and departing to the west. In East Flow, aircraft will arrive from the west and depart to the east, and this is forecasted to occur about 30 percent of the time

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17. Q: I am writing a paper about the OMP for my Transportation Engineering Class and I wanted to know how expanding O'Hare Airport will increase capacity?
FAA Response: O'Hare's pre-modernization airfield configuration relied on complex, intersecting runway configurations (the north airfield runways formed a triangle) to achieve maximum capacity. Intersecting runway configurations cannot be used when poor weather affects the airport.
In contrast, the O'Hare Modernization Program (OMP) will provide a simplified parallel runway configuration that is less prone to capacity loss during periods of poor weather conditions. Before the OMP began, the Airport was limited to two independent arrival runways during periods of poor weather. With the OMP, the Airport can maintain three independent arrival runways even during poor weather.
For additional information, the results of the detailed airfield and airspace modeling can be found in the FAA’s Final EIS in Appendix D on the FAA's O'Hare Modernization Program document library website at:
http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix%20D.pdf (46.30 MB)

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16. Q: I was trying to access the approved airport plans for the O'Hare Modernization Plan. I was interested to know if the location of Runway 9C/27C has changed since the plan was approved. It is my understanding that the centerline of Runway 9C/27C on the plan is located 1607 feet north of the centerline of existing Runway 9R/27L. We are considering purchasing a new home in Park Ridge and would like to know where the flight path will be for the yet-to-be built runway.
FAA Response: Chicago's Airport Layout Plan (ALP) depicts the location of the centerline of Runway 9C/27C 1,607 feet north of the centerline of existing Runway 9R/27L. The FAA approved the City's ALP in September 2005 as part of the O'Hare Modernization Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) /Record of Decision (ROD). There have been no changes in the proposed location of this runway since then.

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15. Q: Will the FAA meet with residents?
FAA Response: The FAA participates in the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission (ONCC) monthly meetings, which are open to the public and routinely solicits input from the public as part of the meetings. The ONCC website http://www.oharenoise.org/ provides information on the next monthly meeting.

The City of Chicago, ONCC and the FAA have continued their outreach program to the various City of Chicago wards and communities surrounding O'Hare who have expressed interest in the continuing development.�� Informational workshops will held through the spring/summer of 2013 to address residents questions regarding the upcoming runway opening and changes to the airspace surrounding O'Hare.

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14. Q: There has also been some information about the forest preserve just to the west of Maine South High School being an emergency landing area for the airport. Can you confirm this information?
FAA Response: The forest preserve to the west of Maine South High School has not been designated as an emergency landing area.

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13. Q: What are the FAA guidelines with regard to flight safety altitudes? 600 ft above my school/house just doesn't seem to me to meet the guidelines concerning the safety of those on the ground.
FAA Response: The Federal Aviation Regulations do not prescribe minimum altitudes for aircraft when necessary for takeoff and landing. Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 91 prescribes the rules governing the operation of aircraft.
Sec. 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.
Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes:
(a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface.
(b) Over congested areas. Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.
(c) Over other than congested areas. An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure.
(d) Helicopters. Helicopters may be operated at less than the minimums prescribed in paragraph(b)or(c)of this section if the operation is conducted without hazard to persons or property on the surface. In addition, each person operating a helicopter shall comply with any routes or altitudes specifically prescribed for helicopters by the Administrator

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12. Q: Have you heard of any yellow goo falling on the neighborhoods?
FAA Response: A Park Ridge resident called the FAA's O'Hare Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) on December 24, 2008 and stated that they believed that a yellow material covering an area of approximately 15 yards by 20 yards was extruded from an aircraft and landed on his property. The resident obtained a sample of the material from the snow and took photos. A FSDO Inspector visited the property on December 29, 2008 and received the sample of the material from the resident. The sample was given to the City of Chicago for laboratory testing and the test results determined that the sample was water. The FSDO inspector informed the resident of the results of the testing.

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11. Q: What is the definition of the "Point of No Return" as it relates to crash paths and which runways are used?  Which runways at ORD are designated as Crash Site runways?
FAA Response: There are no FAA definitions that match "Point of No Return", "crash paths" or "Crash Site runways". All current and future runways at O'Hare have been evaluated and meet FAA safety standards.

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10. Q: What emergency procedures are in place if an aircraft states that it is in distress? Which runways are used or preferred for landings when an aircraft is distressed, in danger or otherwise compromised. Are certain runways used more than others during such conditions? If so, which?
FAA Response: When a pilot notifies Air Traffic that they have an emergency, Air Traffic asks the pilot what they need. This includes the possibility that if the aircraft needs to return to the airfield or to land at the airport, the pilot selects the runway. The FAA simultaneously contacts the City of Chicago Department of Aviation Operations Department and the three fire stations located on the airport.

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9. Q: Cook County did not take the aircraft noise into consideration when they revised my property value. Who do I talk to having it modified?
FAA Response: The FAA recommends that the resident contact the Cook County Assessor for information on home property values.

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8. Q: Can kites be flown near the airport (i.e. in Park Ridge)?
FAA Response:14 CFR Part 101 states that...within 5 miles of the boundary of any airport "...No person may operate an unshielded moored balloon or kite more than 150 feet above the surface of the earth unless, at least 24 hours before  beginning the operation, he gives the following information to the FAA ATC facility that is nearest to the place of intended operation: (a) the names and addresses of the owners and operators, (b) the size of the balloon or the size and weight of the kite, (c) the location of the operation, (d) the height above the surface of the earth at which the balloon or kite is to be operated, and (e) the date, time and duration of the operation." There are also additional lighting and marking requirements, if the balloon or kite would be operated above 150 feet above the surface of the earth.
Part 101 also states "(a) no person may operate any moored balloon, kite, unmanned rocket, or unmanned free balloon in a manner that creates a hazard to other persons or their property, and (b) no person operating any moored balloon, kite, unmanned rocket, or unmanned free balloon may allow an object to be dropped there from, if such action creates a hazard to other persons or their property."

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7. Q: Who do I talk to for help on my concerns?
FAA Response:You may contact the ONCC/CDA/FAA or your elected officials.

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6. Q: What commercial or financial benefit is Park Ridge receiving for allowing all the travelers to use surrounding communities, such as Rosemont or Bensenville?
FAA Response: Section 5.5 of the EIS presents information on secondary impacts, such as regional growth patterns and jobs.

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5. Q: The support for the OMP is rapidly waning. The airlines recently tried to back out of it because they cannot afford it and see no sense in it during a time when air travel is declining for a variety of reasons.
FAA Response:In March 2011 the City of Chicago, United and American Airlines reached a negotiated agreement that provides funding to complete construction of Runways 10C/28C and 10R/28L, plus associated taxiways, support facilities and infrastructure. This will essentially complete improvements to the south half of O'Hare. Under the agreement negotiations started in March 2013 between the Airlines and the City of Chicago regarding the remaining work under OMP.

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4. Q: If the information we get from ONCC is incorrect, what is the point of participating? Shouldn't the FAA and the City of Chicago be concerned about their credibility with the airport's neighbors and more importantly, shouldn't the participating communities be concerned?
FAA Response: The FAA is concerned about the number of complaints in the communities surrounding O'Hare. The FAA is prepared to continue to provide further educational sessions with ONCC and elected community officials regarding what was evaluated in the EIS and ongoing airfield construction. The FAA will continue to respond to questions raised by the ONCC, the City of Park Ridge and other surrounding communities. The City of Chicago, the ONCC and the FAA have continued their outreach program to the various City of Chicago wards and communities surrounding O'Hare who have expressed interest in the continuing development. Informational workshop will be held through the Spring / Summer of 2013 to address residents' questions regarding the upcoming runway opening and changes to the airspace surrounding O'Hare.

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3. Q: What about safety? Is it possible and that more over flights of Park Ridge make it more likely that a crash will occur? Doesn't the added capacity at O'Hare make this even more likely?
FAA Response: Safety is the FAA's highest priority, and the agency reviewed the design of City's proposal to ensure that it would properly protect the public safety. All of the runway construction proposed is designed to meet and operate to FAA standards.

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2. Q: Why is O'Hare building new runways?
FAA Response:: In 2001, the City announced a major initiative to modernize the airfield at O'Hare International Airport (O'Hare). The Purpose and Need included in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is: to address the project needs of the Chicago region by reducing delays at O'Hare, and thereby enhancing the capacity of the National Airspace System; and ensure that the existing and future terminal facilities and supporting infrastructure can efficiently accommodate airport users. The City of Chicago's O'Hare Modernization Program (OMP) is a multi-year construction program. For more information on the OMP, please visit the OMP website on the Internet at: http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/doa/provdrs/omp.html.

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1. Q: When did the north Runway 9L/27R open?
FAA Response:The City of Chicago (City) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) opened the north runway on Thursday, November 20, 2008. The north runway is 7,500 feet long, 150 feet wide, and is called Runway 9 Left / 27 Right (9L/27R).

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