45. Q: Are new Runway 9C/27C and Runway 9L/27R extension projects still part of the OMP?

44. Q: I live in Glenview, underneath the approach for Runway 22R. How much is the runway being used for arrivals today (May 2013)? Will this change in October 2013 when Runway 10C/28C is commissioned? Will this change again after all the OMP runways are completed?

43. Q: Where can I find more specific information on the changes to runway usage and noise contours at O’Hare when any new runways open?

42. Q: Will the opening of Runway 10C/28C only change the impact of aircraft noise for the communities that lie along its flight paths?

41. Q: What aircraft types use Runway 10C/28C?

40. Q: When will Runway 10C/28C be used?

39. Q: How many flights will arrive on Runway 10C/28C?

38. Q: How will Runway 10C/28C affect the airspace around O’Hare?

37. Q: How will Runway 10C/28C be utilized?

36. Q: Where is Runway 10C/28C located on the airfield, and in relation to O’Hare’s surroundings?

35. Q: When will Runway 10C/28C open?

34. Q: How many night time flights arriving on Runway 27L after October 17, 2013 will be within a two-block distance of my home? I live approximately 5900 north and 5400 west in Chicago.

33. Q: How many flights will arrive on Runway 27L during the day and at night after Runway 10C/28C is commissioned?

32. Q: What is the anticipated year/time frame that O'Hare will permanently close runways 14R/32L & 14L/32R?

31. Q: I object to opening Runway 9L/27R to arrivals beginning at 6:00 a.m.. Can the opening of this runway be delayed until 7:00 a.m.?

30. Q: Will they be tearing up or decommissioning the diagonal runways after Runway 10C/28C is commissioned?

29. Q: What was the pattern before 9L/27R? I couldn’t tell you because it wasn’t bothersome. Now you can’t speak to your neighbor or have a party in your yard, etc.

28. Q: We’ve lived here since 1970 and I know aircraft (arrivals) are going to come over our home, but since lifting the flight limits in 2008, the increased number of flights that come over (47 second intervals ALL DAY) it’s too much. Where are our rights to live peacefully in our home?

27. Q: We are on extended CL of Runway 27L (O’Hare). Another runway (27R), is to follow sandwiched between 27L and 27R – this makes no sense to have 3 runways that close!

26. Q: I live in Oak Park and until the summer of 2007, noisy, low flying, late night aircraft had not been an issue. Starting then, we experienced significant, what appear to be, low flying aircraft flying between 11 pm and 5 am. Why did these aircraft start flying so low and so disruptively so late at night? Can these aircraft be rerouted or directed to ORD's SE-NW runways at a higher elevation?

25. Q: Are any cargo flights taking off of Runway 9L/27R after 10:00 p.m.?

24. Q: How many cargo flights use Runway 9L/27R?

23. Q: How many aircraft utilize Runway 9L/27R in any given month?

22. Q: Are the number of planes for Runway 28 the same as Runway 27R (35-40 per hour)? Is this runway restricted at night? Are cargo planes included in the flights per day numbers or is it only passenger planes?

21. Q: In March the daily average flights arriving on Runway 27R was 85 with no departures. So was this runway only used approximately 13 – 15 % of its full capacity in the month of March, 2009?

20. Q: We were told nighttime flights were restricted on Runway 27R, but we get flights before 6 am and after 10 pm. Are there nighttime restrictions? If not, what is the limited number of planes per hour during night hours?

19. Q: Is the 35 – 40 planes per hour, assumed for operation on Runway 27R, from 6 am to 10 pm (approximately 560 – 640 flights per day?)

18. Q: If they are using 3 runways for arrivals, why are there are 5 or 6 rows of planes coming in towards O’Hare?

17. Q: What is the latest runway utilization? Also, in today's current runway configuration, what is the % breakout by runway of arrival traffic?

16. Q: Can you provide me with the FAA approved glideslopes to Runway 27R? I see aircraft moving east to west from Touhy to as far south as Devon -- literally stacks of 6 plus arrival lanes. I can only assume they are all heading to Runway 27R since the Runway 27L runs roughly in line with the Kennedy Expressway. I drive home in the evening and see stacks of planes coming east to west, all of which I assume are converging on Runway 27R.

15. Q: Who decides where the planes will actually land?

14. Q: Is operation of Runway 9L/27R safe, especially with so many aircraft flying over my house and these schools?

13. Q: Who was responsible for the flight caps at O’Hare being lifted, and why were they lifted?

12. Q: Is Runway 9L/27R being used during hours other than was proposed, specifically after 10 p.m. and midnight?

11. Q: The misinformation about this runway 9L/27R implementation and subsequent use seems deliberate to many of us.

10. Q: What will the final traffic level be after the OMP is done? Is there a maximum of traffic that the FAA will allow? What is that level?

9. Q: An airline pilot in Park Ridge said that the airlines are livid over the amount of traffic being forced to Runway 9L/27R. It is a 20 minute taxi from its end to the terminals, and causes them to use more fuel and makes it harder to reach the gates on time. What is the FAA’s response?

8. Q: What about Runway 10L/28R and the others? How are the runways used today?

7. Q: Has Runway 4L/22R closed? Where did planes land before 27R (was it 22R?). If runway 4L/22R handled the planes before Runway 9L/27R opened, why can’t it handle the traffic again? Can traffic be alternated more frequently?

6. Q: What happened to the runways other than Runway 9L\27R that are intended to be used for arrivals?

5. Q: What aircraft types are using Runway 9L/27R?

4. Q: How will Runway 9L/27R be used?

3. Q: When will Runway 9L/27R be used?

2. Q: Isn’t Runway 9L/27R only supposed to be used only during bad weather?

1. Q: How many flights are arriving on Runway 9L/27R?

45. Q: Are new Runway 9C/27C and Runway 9L/27R extension projects still part of the OMP?
FAA Response: Yes, these projects are part of the program. The CDA has not yet finalized a construction schedule.

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44. Q: I live in Glenview, underneath the approach for Runway 22R. How much is the runway being used for arrivals today (May 2013)? Will this change in October 2013 when Runway 10C/28C is commissioned? Will this change again after all the OMP runways are completed?
FAA Response: Runway 22R is used for arrivals approximately 10.6% of the time. Runway 4L (opposite end of 22R) is used for departures approximately 23% of the time. This is shown in the EIS, Appendix D, page D-7, Exhibit D-2.
The FAA will implement airspace changes, and some O’Hare runways will be used different amounts of time after Runway 10C/28C is commissioned in October 2013. Page D-8, Exhibit D-3 of the EIS depicts how the runways will be used after Runway 10C/28C is commissioned. Runway 22R may be used for arrivals up to 1% of the time and Runway 4L will be used for departures approximately 18% of the time.
After all the OMP runways are completed, runway utilization changes again. This is shown on Page D-9, Exhibit D-4 of the EIS. Runway 22R may be used infrequently for arrivals, and similarly, 4L may be used infrequently for departures. Please refer to EIS Appendix F, page F-82, Table F-39 for details.

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43. Q: Where can I find more specific information on the changes to runway usage and
noise contours at O’Hare when any new runways open?
FAA Response: With the addition of East Flow and West Flow runway patterns, noise contours around O'Hare will change as forecasted in the 2005 Final EIS for the OMP. For the noise contour map as forecasted in the Final EIS with today’s runways in place, see Exhibit 5.1-4. For the noise contour map as forecasted in the Final EIS with the addition of new Runway 10C/28C, see Exhibit 5.1-7. For the noise contour map as forecasted in the Final EIS with the build-out airport, see Exhibit 5.1-10. To see all of these Final EIS graphics, please visit the FAA’s Final EIS webpage on the Internet at: http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/

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42. Q: Will the opening of Runway 10C/28C only change the impact of aircraft noise for the communities that lie along its flight paths?
FAA Response: The opening of Runway 10C/28C will alter the impact of aircraft noise on all of the communities that surround O’Hare, not just those along its flight paths. Activation of Runway 10C/28C in conjunction with airspace changes alter how the airfield is used. The flow of aircraft in and out of O’Hare change to a predominant East-West flow. Some of the more significant changes that happened on October 17, 2013 include:

  • Arrivals on Runways 14L, 14R and 22R will occur less frequently.
  • Arrivals on Runway 9L will occur more frequently.
  • Runway 10L/28R will be used primarily as a departure runway when Runway 10C/28C is being used as an arrival runway.
  • Runways 32L, 22L and 4L will still be used as primary departure runways.

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41. Q: What aircraft types use Runway 10C/28C?
FAA Response: Runway 10C/28C is an Aircraft Design Group VI runway. It can accommodate all aircraft that fly today, including the B747-8 and A380. http://www.faa.gov/airports/engineering/aircraft_char_database/

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40. Q: When will Runway 10C/28C be used?
FAA Response: The runway will be used for simultaneous triple parallel approaches during all weather conditions during the daytime. The runway will also be used at night.

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39. Q: How many flights will arrive on Runway 10C/28C?
FAA Response: As the airport operator, the City determines which runways are open and available for use by the airlines and the air traffic controllers. The FAA utilizes these runways based on airfield, air traffic, and weather conditions, all of which cause the number of aircraft utilizing individual runways to vary every day. The FAA’s EIS assumed that in Build-Out conditions, currently estimated to occur in 2020, the average annual daytime and nighttime percentage of arrivals from the east for Runway 10C/28C would be 23.5 percent and 5.3 percent, respectively. The average annual daytime and nighttime percentage of arrivals from the west from Runway 10C/28C would be 8.9 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively. These are average percentages, and it was assumed that some days would experience more or less arrivals, due to prevailing winds, aircraft demand, and weather conditions. The FAA’s forecast used in the EIS assumed that operational levels at O’Hare would be higher than what are currently being experienced. Due to the decrease in actual operation levels from original projections, the number of arrivals expected to occur on Runway 10C/28C are anticipated to be less than what was assumed in the EIS.

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38. Q: How will Runway 10C/28C affect the airspace around O’Hare?
FAA Response: Activation of Runway 10C/28C will result in airspace changes that will alter how the airfield is used. The flow of planes in and out of O’Hare will change to a predominant East-West flow. In general over the course of a year, the majority of the time (about 70 percent) O’Hare will be in a West Flow air traffic pattern, with aircraft arriving from the east and departing to the west. In East Flow, aircraft will arrive from the west and depart to the east, and this is forecasted to occur about 30 percent of the time.

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37. Q: How will Runway 10C/28C be utilized?
FAA Response: Mostly as an arrival runway during the majority of weather and wind conditions.

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36. Q: Where is Runway 10C/28C located on the airfield, and in relation to O’Hare’s surroundings?
FAA Response: On the south airfield, approximately 1,200 feet south of existing Runway 10L/28R (as measured from centerline to centerline). Runway Separation Diagram (JPG)

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35. Q: When will Runway 10C/28C open?
FAA Response: The City of Chicago (City) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) expect to commission the runway on October 17, 2013. The runway is 10,800 feet long, 200 feet wide, and is called Runway 10C/28C (10 Center / 28 Center).

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34. Q: How many night time flights arriving on Runway 27L after October 17, 2013 will be within a two-block distance of my home? I live approximately 5900 north and 5400 west in Chicago.
FAA Response: A slight variation in a plane’s path on arrival is not unusual, due to winds and weather conditions. The FAA uses models based on actual data to estimate future airport operations. Please refer to Appendix F, Attachment 2 of the EIS, pages F-340 through F-344 (Exhibits 14 through 18). The diagrams show the noise modeling done for the OMP after Runway 10C/28C commissions until Build-Out (all OMP runways complete). These diagrams illustrate the variability in flight tracks for approach and departure for all times of day and night. When movement is further away from the runway threshold, there is greater variation in a plane’s location on approach. The approximate location given is 3/4 mile north of the Runway 27L approach and 6 miles east of the Runway 27L threshold, and appears to be at the edge of the area captured in the exhibits. Please refer to the exhibits. Exhibit 17 shows modeled Runway 27L arrival tracks.

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33. Q: How many flights will arrive on Runway 27L during the day and at night After Runway 10C/28C is commissioned?
FAA Response: As the airport operator, the City determines which runways are open and available for use by the airlines and the air traffic controllers. The FAA utilizes these runways based on airfield, air traffic, and weather conditions, all of which cause the number of aircraft utilizing individual runways to vary every day. The FAA's EIS assumed that when Runway 10C/28C is commissioned the average annual day daytime arrival count for Runway 27L would be 326, and the average annual day nighttime arrival count for Runway 27L would be 63. The FAA's EIS assumed that in Build-Out conditions the average annual day daytime arrival count for Runway 27L would be 14, and the average annual day nighttime arrival count for Runway 27L would be 59. This is an average count, and it was assumed that some days would experience more or fewer arrivals, due to prevailing winds, aircraft demand, and weather conditions.
The FAA's forecast used in the EIS assumed that operational levels at O'Hare would be higher than what are currently being experienced. Due to the decrease in actual operation levels, the arrivals occurring on Runway 27L are currently less than what was assumed in the EIS.

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32. Q: What is the anticipated year/time frame that O'Hare will permanently close runways 14R/32L & 14L/32R?
FAA Response: Runways 14R/32L and 14L/32R will be decommissioned during the completion phase of the OMP. The City of Chicago currently does not have a published date for runway decommissioning or OMP completion.

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31. Q: I object to opening Runway 9L/27R to arrivals beginning at 6:00 a.m.. Can the opening of this runway be delayed until 7:00 a.m.?
FAA Response: As the owner and operator of O'Hare Airport, the City of Chicago determines on a daily basis which runways will be open and available for use by the airlines and the air traffic control based on airfield, air traffic and weather conditions. The large volume of flights scheduled for arrival between 6:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. requires that this runway be used to minimize delays. Delaying the opening of Runway 9L/27R until 7:00 a.m. would significantly impact airport delays, and efficiency and capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS).

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30. Q: Will they be tearing up or decommissioning the diagonal runways?
FAA Response: As part of the construction of the O’Hare Modernization Program, both northwest-southeast diagonal Runways (14R/32L and 14L/32R) will be decommissioned. The central portion of Runway 14R/32L will be converted to a taxiway. A majority of Runway 14L/32R will be demolished and removed. Runways 4R/22L and 4L/22R, which are the northeast-southwest diagonals, will remain in operation.

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29. Q: What was the pattern before 9L/27R? I couldn’t tell you because it wasn’t bothersome. Now you can’t speak to your neighbor or have a party in your yard, etc.
FAA Response: Prior to the commissioning of Runway 9L/27R, Runway 27L was the predominant runway used for arrivals, followed by Runway 9R. Predominant departure runways were Runways 32L followed by Runway 22L as detailed on Exhibit E-16 on the FAA EIS Page E-60. (http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix%20E.pdf)
With the exception of the addition of Runway 9L/27R in November 2008, the arrival and departure patterns for the airport have not changed. However Runway 27L is used more frequently for arrivals since November 2008.The Chicago Department of Aviation provides information monthly on runway use at O’Hare Airport on their website. The report presents the average percentage of use for each runway for each month, the previous month and a 12- month average.

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28. Q: We’ve lived here since 1970 and I know aircraft (arrivals) are going to come over our home, but since lifting the flight limits in 2008, the increased number of flights that come over (47 second intervals ALL DAY) it’s too much. Where are our rights to live peacefully in our home?
FAA Response: The FAA is concerned about the number of complaints generated by airport operations on the communities surrounding O’Hare. Federal agencies that provide funding for transportation infrastructure projects such as the City of Chicago’s OMP are required by federal law to conduct a comprehensive environmental analysis of the project and to outline reasonable actions to mitigate environmental impacts. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), completed by the FAA with an issuance of a Record of Decision in 2005, was conducted and completed in partnership with a number of Federal, state and local government agencies. As a part of this process, the FAA sought public input through a number of mechanisms, including a series of public meetings and all comments received during the EIS process were addressed by the FAA and factored into our final environmental decision. Should you wish to review the EIS and associated documentation, please visit: http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/ With regards to flight limits (caps), please see Question #13.

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27. Q: We are on extended CL of Runway 27L (O’Hare). Another runway (27C), is to follow sandwiched between 27L and 27R – this makes no sense to have 3 runways that close!
FAA Response: Upon full build out of the OMP, O’Hare Airport’s north airfield will include three parallel runways: Runway 9R/27L (existing), Runway 9L/27R (completed in November 2008), and Runway 9C/27C. The predominant runway use anticipated for the north airfield will be arrivals on Runways 9L/27R and 9C/27C and departures on Runways 9R/27L as depicted on Exhibit E-19 of the FAA EIS page E-65.

(http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix E.pdf).

The City of Chicago, as owner and operator of O’Hare Airport, proposed reconfiguration of the Airport as part of the O’Hare Modernization Environmental Impact Statement. An Airport Layout Plan (ALP) depicting the OMP proposal (including proposed runway layout) was submitted to the FAA to begin review in December 2002. The primary role of FAA, with regard to evaluating the City of Chicago’s O’Hare Airport development proposal, was to assure that all applicable Federal requirements related to design and operation of the proposed facility were properly applied, and to assure that the environmental impacts of the proposed development were properly evaluated. The FAA completed a comprehensive technical and environmental analysis of the City’s proposal and determined that all technical and environmental considerations were addressed. A Record of Decision (ROD) was issued in September 2005 which enabled the City to proceed with the reconfiguration of O’Hare.

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26. Q: I live in Oak Park and until the summer of 2007, noisy, low flying, late night aircraft had not been an issue. Starting then, we experienced significant, what appear to be, low flying aircraft flying between 11 pm and 5 am. Why did these aircraft start flying so low and so disruptively so late at night? Can these aircraft be rerouted or directed to ORD's SE-NW runways at a higher elevation?
FAA Response: Oak Park is about eight miles away from the threshold of Runway 32L, which has a SE-NW alignment. Runway 14R/32L is a key component of the City of Chicago’s Fly Quiet Preferential Runway Use Plan. The plan was developed to minimize the effects of noise between the hours of 10:00 pm to 7:00 am on the communities surrounding O’Hare. You can view the plan at: http://www.flychicago.com/OHare/EN/AboutUs/NoiseManagement/FlyQuiet/Pages/Fly-Quiet-Program.aspx

Runway 14R (which aligns with the communities to the northwest of O’Hare) is the primary runway used for arrivals in this plan unless weather or loss of critical Navigational Aids dictates that another runway be used. Runway 32L (which aligns with Oak Park) is the secondary runway used for arrivals in this plan. Nothing changed at O’Hare in 2007 that would cause the aircraft to fly at any different altitude than they have historically. The approach descent is fixed by the Instrument Landing System (ILS) at a constant three degree slope, which the aircraft use for guidance. The aircraft start the three degree descent approximately 10-22 miles away from the runway threshold, and maintain it until touchdown.

As part of the Fly Quiet program, night time operations on Runway 14R/32L, will continue until the runway is permanently closed. As part of the ongoing O’Hare Modernization Program (OMP), Runway 32L is closed permanently to all arrivals after May 6th, 2010. Later in the OMP, Runway 14R/32L will be closed to all traffic.

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25. Q: Are any cargo flights taking off of Runway 9L/27R after 10:00 p.m.?
FAA Response: The FAA sends information regarding nighttime operations on Runway 9L/27R to the ONCC on a monthly basis. Please click on “Monthly ONCC Correspondence” link at this website: (http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/FAQ/index.cfm).
While this correspondence does not identify air carrier vs. cargo operators, it will indicate what, if any departures, have used the runway overnight. For specific operations by type of operator, please see Question 24.

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24. Q: How many cargo flights use Runway 9L/27R?
FAA Response: Details on types of aircraft or specific operations from the O’Hare Noise Compatibility Commission (ONCC). Please contact the ONCC at http://www.flychicago.com/OHare/EN/AboutUs/NoiseManagement/default.aspx .

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23. Q: How many aircraft utilize Runway 9L/27R in any given month?
FAA Response: The City of Chicago publishes monthly reports on O’Hare runway utilization. The reports are posted on the Chicago Department of Aviation (CDA) web page and can be found at: http://flychicago.com/Environment/Noise/OHare/NoiseManagementData/Default.aspx

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22. Q: Are the number of planes for Runway 28 the same as Runway 27R (35-40 per hour)? Is this runway restricted at night? Are cargo planes included in the flights per day numbers or is it only passenger planes?
FAA Response: Before the opening of 10C/28C, When the Parallel 27/28 configuration is used, the arrival rate for Runway 28R can be between 35-40 per hour.

Operations on Runway 10L/28R is not restricted at night, it is the designated preferential runway by the City of Chicago for use during Fly Quiet conditions which occur from 10:00 PM to 7:00 AM, when feasible, unless wind, weather, runway closures or loss of critical navigational aids dictate otherwise.

Aircraft operations assumed in the EIS included all aircraft activity occurring at the airport, including cargo operations.

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21. Q: In March the daily average flights arriving on Runway 27R was 85 with no departures. So was this runway only used approximately 13 – 15 % of its full capacity in the month of March, 2009?
FAA Response: The 85 operations that you referenced were the average daily arrivals on Runway 27R for March 2009. There are days that are much lower than this and there are some days that are much higher. “Runway Utilization” Question #17 on the website also addresses this question.

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20. Q: We were told nighttime flights were restricted on Runway 27R, but we get flights before 6 am and after 10 pm. Are there nighttime restrictions? If not, what is the limited number of planes per hour during night hours?
FAA Response: See Question #12 Residents may also be hearing operations on other runways. With ongoing airfield construction, the airport is utilizing some runways at other times than you may be accustomed. FAA sends a monthly letter on the nighttime usage of this runway. These letters are being forwarded to the chairman o fthe ONCC on a monthly basis. They are avalible here: http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/FAQ/ONCC/index.cfm

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19. Q: Is the 35 – 40 planes per hour, assumed for operation on Runway 27R, from 6 am to 10 pm (approximately 560 – 640 flights per day?)
FAA Response: When the Parallel 27/28 configuration (defined as the configuration “Parallel 27s” in the EIS) is used, the arrival rate for Runway 27R can be between 35-40 per hour, now and in the future. It is available for use approximately 63% of the time currently, and at full build out will be available for use approximately 72% of the time. If enough aircraft demand is present and the Parallel 27 configuration is used from 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM, the runway has the ability to accommodate 560-640 aircraft per day.

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18. Q: If they are using 3 runways for arrivals, why are there are 5 or 6 rows of planes coming in towards O’Hare?
FAA Response: Although there may appear to be more lines of aircraft, when arrivals are occurring from the east on Runways 27R, 27L, and 28, there only three arrival streams of aircraft, one for each runway. See Question #16 above for more details.

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17. Q: What is the latest runway utilization? Also, in today's current runway configuration, what is the % breakout by runway of arrival traffic?
FAA Response: The City of Chicago provides data to the O’Hare Noise Compatibility Commission (ONCC) on runway utilization. This information is available on the ONCC’s web site. http://www.oharenoise.org

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16. Q: Can you provide me with the FAA approved glideslopes to Runway 27R? I see aircraft moving east to west from Touhy to as far south as Devon -- literally stacks of 6 plus arrival lanes. I can only assume they are all heading to Runway 27R since the Runway 27L runs roughly in line with the Kennedy Expressway. I drive home in the evening and see stacks of planes coming east to west, all of which I assume are converging on Runway 27R.
FAA Response: O’Hare currently has three parallel runways that allow for simultaneous approaches from the east, landing to the west. The lateral (horizontal) separation between Runway 27R and 27L is 7,418 feet. The lateral separation between Runway 27L and Runway 28 is 5,594 feet.

The Glide Slope provides an approaching aircraft with the appropriate angle of descent. A Localizer provides an aircraft information that allows it to line up on the centerline of a runway. Typically an aircraft will fix on the Localizer from 10 to 22 miles away from a runway end and then stay in alignment with the Localizer, on the centerline of the runway, for its descent. A runway with instrument approaches (like Runways 27R, 27L, 28R and the future runways at O’Hare) each has one Glide Slope and one Localizer. The electronic signals are fixed, and provide consistent information to aircraft.

When aircraft are more than 22 miles away from O’Hare they are at least three miles apart laterally (horizontally). The aircraft are also three or more miles apart in their longitudinal (one behind the other) separation. As they approach the airport they are in closer proximity laterally (see runway separation distances above), and at approximately the same separation longitudinally. Despite appearances, there are only three streams of aircraft into O’Hare from the east.

A depiction of the various flight tracks when the OMP is completed is located in the EIS, Appendix F, and Attachment F-2. Please see the Alternative C exhibits.
(http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/F-Attachment-2.pdf)

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15. Q: Who decides where the planes will actually land?
FAA Response: The FAA determines which runways to use based on the City of Chicago's determination of available runways and prevailing weather conditions. It is a complex decision-making process which includes consideration of an airplane’s origin or destination, as well as other en route traffic. Safety, efficiency to the users and capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS) are all taken into consideration when planning complex operations such as at O’Hare. The preference is to allow arriving aircraft to be space routed to the runway that is closest to the origination city without having to cross other aircraft streams enroute to the Airport.

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14. Q: Is operation of Runway 9L/27R safe, especially with so many aircraft flying over my house and these schools?
FAA Response: Safety is the FAA's highest priority. The FAA reviewed the design of the City’s proposal to ensure that it would properly protect the public safety. Runway 9L/27R was designed to meet and operate to FAA standards, as are all planned runways and runway extensions.

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13. Q: Who was responsible for the flight caps at O’Hare being lifted, and why were they lifted?
FAA Response: Arrivals at O’Hare were capped in 2004 at 88 operations per hour during most hours of the day to alleviate extreme congestion until the first runway of the O’Hare Modernization Program (OMP) could be opened. The extension to Runway 10L/28R that opened on September 25, 2008 and the new Runway 9L/27R that opened on November 20, 2008 are part of the OMP, the purpose of which is to address the projected needs of the Chicago region by reducing delays at O’Hare, and thereby enhancing the capacity of the National Airspace System. As planned, the FAA allowed the flight caps at O’Hare to expire on October 31, 2008.

The aviation industry has been deregulated since 1978. The FAA does not have the authority to determine airline routes, destinations or schedules, but may intervene in extreme cases of congestion, such as the delays that were impacting O’Hare and the entire national air transportation system in 2004.

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12. Q: Is Runway 9L/27R being used during hours other than was proposed, specifically after 10 p.m. and midnight?
FAA Response: The O’Hare Modernization EIS anticipated that Runway 27R would be used infrequently at night. Specifically, it included the assumption that nighttime arrivals would occur four percent (4%) of the time at the time of Build Out (See Table F-39 on page F-82 of the Final EIS –
(http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-F.pdf). “Build Out,” as defined in the EIS, is the point in time at which Runways 9L/27R (new), 9C/27C (new), 9R/27L (extended), 10L/27R(extended), 10C/28C (new), 10R/28L (new), 4L/22R, and 4R/22L will all be in operation.

Although the normal hours of operation for the North Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and Runway 9L/27R are 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM, there is no prohibition of aircraft arriving on Runway 27R after 10:00 PM. The FAA prefers to have the North ATCT open no later than 10:00 PM. However, the number and time of flights arriving on Runway 27R can be affected by weather conditions, alternate runways affected by disabled aircraft, and other issues. When the North ATCT and Runway 9L/27R are open past 10:00 PM, the FAA incurs additional operational expenses. Monthly reports continue to be provided on the usage of this runway and are being forwarded to the chairman of the ONCC on a monthly basis. They are available here: http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/FAQ/ONCC/Index.cfm

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11. Q: The misinformation about Runway 9L/27R implementation and subsequent use seems deliberate to many of us.
FAA Response: The anticipated runway use has been publicly available since the issuance of the Draft EIS in January 2005. See the information provided in the EIS Information section regarding the FAA’s coordination with ONCC and the City of Park Ridge and public meetings held on the Draft EIS.

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10. Q: What will the final traffic level be after the OMP is done? Is there a maximum of traffic that the FAA will allow? What is that level?
FAA Response: There currently is no maximum traffic that the FAA will allow at O’Hare. The activity level will be determined by the business plans of the airlines and other airport users. The FAA evaluated 1.194 million total annual takeoffs and landings 5 years after the completion of the project. In 2007, the Airport accommodated approximately 926,000 total take offs and landings. The FAA’s EIS did determine that delays would once again grow after completion the modernization effort to levels experienced in the early 2000's when the Airport reached approximately 1.4 million total annual take offs and landings. The FAA Terminal Area Forcast (TAF) is updated annually to estimate future traffic at major airports. You can access FAA's current TAF here: http://aspm.faa.gov/main/taf.asp

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9. Q: An airline pilot in Park Ridge said that the airlines are livid over the amount of traffic being forced to Runway 9L/27R. It is a 20 minute taxi from its end to the terminals, and causes them to use more fuel and makes it harder to reach the gates on time. What is the FAA’s response?
FAA Response: The airlines have not submitted any comments to the FAA regarding taxi times from Runway 9L/27R. Arrivals from Runway 27R, based on modeling take between 15 and 16 minutes on average to reach the gate. Although there is extra taxi time when compared to closer in runways, the Airport is able to accommodate additional arrivals due to the new runway.

Under the best case scenario before November 20, 2008 the Airport was able to process no more than approximately 100 arrivals per hour. The Airport is able to process up to 112 arrivals (the majority of which are on other runways than Runway 27R) per hour. The additional taxi time is offset (and then some) by the Airport’s ability to accommodate additional flights that would have either been delayed or cancelled at the origination airport. Despite the taxi time, this arrangement provides for fuel savings and delay reduction.

In late 2013 a taxiway, Zulu, opened on the west side of the airport. Its primary use is to support 9L/27R and provide a shorter taxi route to the terminal area.

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8. Q: What about Runway 10L/28R and the others? How are the runways used today?
FAA Response: Runway 10/28 is continuing to be used as weather conditions warrant. See EIS page D-8
(http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-D.pdf). The City of Chicago will continue to provide actual runway use statistics to the ONCC at the Full Commission meetings.

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7. Q: Has Runway 4L/22R closed? Where did planes land before 27R (was it 22R?). If runway 4L/22R handled the planes before Runway 9L/27R opened, why can’t it handle the traffic again? Can traffic be alternated more frequently?
FAA Response: Runway 4L/22R remains in use and will continue to be used. With the existing airport layout, it is planned to be used as an arrival runway (Runway 22R) during a configuration that is anticipated to be used approximately 10% of the year. It is also planned to be used as a departure runway (Runway 4L) during a configuration that is anticipated to be used approximately 23% of the year. As with normal practice, the City of Chicago will provide actual runway use statistics to the ONCC at the Full Commission meetings.

Many of the flights landing on Runway 27R previously used Runway 22R. This is because the configuration Plan W (see page D-6 of the EIS – http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-D.pdf) was removed as of November 20, 2008, due to airspace changes, reducing the number of landings on Runway 22R. Now Parallel 27s will be the most frequently used (See pages D-7 and D-9 – http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-D.pdf).

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6. Q: What happened to the runways other than Runway 9L/27R that are intended to be used for arrivals?
FAA Response: Other runways are being used for arrivals as assumed in the EIS. See EIS pages D-7 and D-9
(http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-D.pdf).

Activation of Runway 10C/28C will result in airspace changes that will alter how the airfield is used. th eflow of planes in and out of O'Hare will change to a predominant East-West flow. In general over the course of a year, the majority of the time (about 70 percent) O'Hare will be in a west flow air traffice pattern with aircraft arriving from the East and departing to the West. In East flow. Aircraft will arrive from the West and depart to the East, and this is forcasted to occur about 30 percentof the time.

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5. Q: What aircraft types are using Runway 9L/27R?
FAA Response: Runway 9L/27R will be used to its full capability in both direction according to the final EIS found here:
http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/

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4. Q: How will Runway 9L/27R be used?
FAA Response: In response to a request from ONCC, in September 2008 the FAA provided information as to the intended runway use of the new Runway 9L/27R. The FAA accurately stated that this runway will not be utilized 100% of the time when it opens. This statement was meant to convey that when first opened, Runway 9L would only occasionally be used for arrivals, while Runway 27R would be used regularly for arrivals, as weather conditions dictate. The FAA did not state that arrivals on Runway 27R would not be used to its full capability. When Runway 10C/28C is opened, Runway 9L will be used to its full capability, and then Runway 9L/27R will be used to its full capability in both directions.

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3. Q: When will Runway 9L/27R be used?
FAA Response: During the day Runway 27Rwill be used for simultaneous triple parallel approaches during all weather conditions. The runway is anticipated to be used infrequently at night. The City’s nighttime noise abatement program, called the Fly Quiet Program, does not include this runway as a preferential nighttime runway.

The EIS evaluated the runway for use in all weather conditions; however, its delay reduction benefits are greatest in poor weather conditions. It is available for use approximately 63% of the time currently, and at full build out will be available for use approximately 72% of the time. Build Out annual daytime runway use is estimated to be 22.4% of all annual arrivals. When the Parallel 27 configuration is being used the arrival rate for Runway 27R can be between 35-40 per hour, now and in the future. See FAA EIS pages D-7 and D-9
(http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-D.pdf), and F-82 (http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/eis/feis/Media/Appendix-F.pdf).

The FAA sends information regarding nighttime operations on the Runway 9L/27R to the ONCC on a monthly basis. Please click on "Monthly ONCC Correspondence" link at this website:

http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_development/omp/FAQ/index.cfm

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2. Q: Isn’t Runway 9L/27R only supposed to be used only during bad weather?
FAA Response: Runway 9L/27R is considered an all-weather runway. O’Hare will receive the greatest benefits of this runway during bad weather conditions by allowing air traffic controllers to utilize a third east-west parallel runway for aircraft arrivals. In order to maintain a safe and efficient airspace, the FAA utilizes all of O’Hare’s current runways as needed depending on airfield, air traffic, and weather conditions, as well as noise abatement procedures.

Projected usage of the runways was disclosed in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and source documents made available for public review and comment prior to the publication of the Final EIS. The FAA met with and provided information to ONCC and communities surrounding O’Hare, and reviewed and accepted public comments prior to approving the City’s requested runway alignment. Please see Question #3 for a link to FAA EIS.

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1. Q: How many flights are arriving on Runway 9L/27R?
FAA Response: As the airport operator, the City determines which runways are open and available for use by the airlines and the air traffic controllers. The FAA utilizes these runways based on airfield, air traffic, and weather conditions, all of which cause the number of aircraft utilizing individual runways to vary every day. The FAA’s EIS assumed that in Build-Out conditions the average annual day arrival count for Runway 27R would be 326. This is an average count, and it was assumed that some days would experience more or fewer arrivals, due to prevailing winds, aircraft demand, and weather conditions.

The FAA’s forecast used in the EIS assumed that operational levels at O’Hare would be higher than what are currently being experienced. Due to the decrease in actual operation levels, the arrivals occurring on Runway 27R are currently less than what was assumed in the EIS.

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