Appendix E. Domestic Flight Data (Legacy)

    Section 1. General

    1. 5-1-1. COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE

    Most flight movement data exchanged outside of the facility is processed by automated systems such as NADIN. It is important to adhere to strict format and procedures during normal operations as well as system interruption periods.

    1. Circuit interruption notifications should be as follows:
    1. Consult your operational system handbook and standard operating procedures for detailed instructions regarding circuit interruption notification procedures.
    2. Notify any guarding facility/sector, the Aeronautical Information System Replacement (AISR) Customer Service Center, and NADIN.
    1. All outage reports should refer to the correct circuit and/or equipment identification numbers. Facilities should obtain and record ticket numbers provided by AISR or the TELCO authority.
    2. AISR and NADIN telephone numbers.
    1. NADIN/ATLANTA: (KATLYTYX)
      770-210-7675.
    2. NADIN/SALT LAKE CITY: (KSLCYTYX) 801-320-2172.
    3. AISR Helpdesk: 866-466-1336.
    1. Weather Message Switching Center Replacement (WMSCR) telephone numbers.
    1. WMSCR/ATLANTA: 770-210-7574.
    2. WMSCR/SALT LAKE CITY:
      801-320-2046.
    1. 5-1-2. FLIGHT PLANS

    Filing a VFR flight plan is recommended. Brief pilots, as appropriate, on the following:

    1. Identify the tie-in station for the departure point, and advise the pilot to report departure time directly to that facility.
    2. When a departure report is unlikely because of inadequate communications capability, advise the pilot that the flight plan will be activated using the proposed departure time as the actual departure time. Include “ASMD DEP” in remarks. The pilot is responsible for closing, cancelling, or extending the flight plan if the flight is canceled or delayed.
    3. Determine the flight plan area in which the destination is located. Request the pilot close the flight plan with the tie-in facility. Provide the pilot the tie-in facility/sector contact information upon request.
    4. Recommend that a separate flight plan be filed for each leg of a VFR flight.
    5. Request the pilot inform FSS whenever the filed time en route changes more than 30 minutes.
    6. On return flights from remote areas, such as a fishing site, establish a mutually acceptable date/time with the pilot for alerting search and rescue.
    7. When a pilot files to an airport served by a part-time FSS and the ETA is during the period the facility is closed, ask the pilot to close with the associated FSS, identified in FAA Order JO 7350.9, Location Identifiers, and the Chart Supplement U.S.
    8. Upon request, inform pilots filing IFR flight plans of the appropriate and most effective means of obtaining IFR departure clearances.
    9. When a pilot files a DVFR flight plan, advise the pilot to activate with Flight Service. Also advise the pilot that a discrete beacon code will be assigned upon activation.

    NOTE-

    1. A discrete beacon code may be assigned when the flight plan is filed, as necessary. If the pilot wants to file a DVFR flight plan that departs outside the facility's flight plan area, provide the applicable toll-free number for the departure FSS.
    2. Discrete beacon codes are assigned to facilities in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.66, National Beacon Code Allocation Plan.
    1. 5-1-3. FLIGHT PLAN DATA

    Handle flight plan data as follows:

    1. Record flight plan data on a domestic or ICAO flight plan form or electronic equivalent. Locally approved procedures may be used to manually record data prior to entry into the operational system. Flight plan data received from an operations office may be limited to only those items required for ATC or SAR purposes, provided the operations office obtains complete information on the flight.
    2. Accept military flight plan proposals, cancellations, and closures from any source, including collect telephone calls.

    NOTE-

    Part-time operations offices must provide complete information in the event it is needed for SAR purposes.

    1. 5-1-4. TYPES OF DATA RECORDED
    1. Operational system entries for:
    1. Flight plans and related messages.
    2. Logging pilot briefings and aircraft contacts.
    3. Service A/B messages.
    1. Manual strip marking.
    1. 5-1-5. METHODS OF RECORDING DATA
    1. Except as provided in para 3-2-2b, all entries must be made directly into the operational system.
    2. Locally approved procedures may be used to manually record data during heavy traffic periods or system outages. Aircraft contact information should be logged in the operational system as soon as practical.
    3. Use control/clearance symbols, abbreviations, location identifiers, and contractions for recording position reports, traffic clearances, and other data. When recording data either electronically or manually, you may use:
    1. Plain language to supplement data when it will aid in understanding the recorded information.
    2. Locally approved contractions and identifiers for frequently used terms and local fixes not listed in FAA Order JO 7340.2, Contractions, or FAA Order JO 7350.9, Location Identifiers. Use only within your facility, not on data or interphone circuits. All locally approved contractions and identifiers must be placed in facility files for record and reference purposes.
    1. When recording data manually, use the standard hand-printed characters shown in FIG 6-1-1 to prevent misinterpretation.

    TBL 5-1-1
    Hand-Printed Characters Chart

    A graphic depicting the front side of the Flight Plan form.

    NOTE-

    A slant line crossing through the numeral zero and an underline of the letter “S” on handwritten portions of flight progress strips are required only when there is reason to believe the lack of these markings could lead to a misunderstanding. A slant line through the numeral zero is required on all weather data.

    1. To correct or update data, draw a horizontal line through it and write the correct information adjacent to it.
    2. Do not erase any item.
    1. 5-1-6. IFR/VFR/DVFR FLIGHT PLAN RECORDING
    1. Use the operational system to record and file flight plans, flight plan modifications, cancellations, activations, and closures for appropriate distribution and processing. Detailed instructions are contained in the operational system manuals.

    NOTE-

    FSS operational systems contain an electronic equivalent of authorized FAA Flight Plan Forms.

    1. When closing an active VFR flight plan, obtain departure point and destination, if not already known.

    NOTE-

    A canceled VFR flight plan is one that is removed from a proposed list and has not been activated. A closed VFR flight plan is one that has been activated and is now removed from an inbound list.

    1. Flight plan information may initially be recorded on FAA Form 7233-1 or other paper prior to entry into the operational system.
    1. 5-1-7. PART-TIME FSS CLOSURE ACTION

    Part-time facilities must forward the following information to the designated guard FSS:

    1. Inbound flights - all information.
    2. Outbound flights - VFR and IFR flight plan data when proposed departure time and/or ETA is within the period from 1 hour prior to closing until 1 hour after opening.
    3. All other pertinent information; for example, NOTAMs and pending outages.
    1. 5-1-8. TELEPHONE REQUESTS FOR ATC CLEARANCES

    When a telephone request for an ATC clearance is received, positively verify the departure location by airport name or location identifier, and the city name and state.

    NOTE-

    1. With telephone calls being received from larger geographic areas, verification of the departure location may prevent a critical safety situation involving similar or identical airport or city names possibly located in different states.
    2. City refers to a city, town, village, or publicly recognized place.
    3. Refer to FAA Order JO 7110.10, Paragraph 3-3-7, ATC Clearances, Advisories, or Requests, for guidance on relaying ATC clearances.

    Section 2. Flight Plan Recording

    1. 5-2-1. FLIGHT PLAN RECORDING

    Record flight plans on FAA Form 7233-1, Flight Plan, or electronic equivalent. Completion of all blocks or fields is not required in every case, and all items filed are not always transmitted. Use authorized abbreviations where possible. The instructions below are for completion of FAA Form 7233-1. For electronic versions of flight plan forms, refer to that system's operating instructions.

    NOTE-

    Use FAA Form 7233-4, International Flight Plan, for international flights as well as flights in domestic U.S. airspace in which automatic assignment of RNAV routes is desired. See para 5-2-3, Flight Plans with Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes in Domestic U.S. Airspace.

    1. Item 1. Type of flight plan. Check the appropriate box.
    2. Item 2. Aircraft Identification. Enter as follows, but do not exceed seven alphanumeric characters:
    1. Civil Aircraft Including Air Carrier. Aircraft letter/digit registration including the letter “T” prefix for air taxi aircraft, the letter “L” for MEDEVAC aircraft, or the three-letter aircraft company designator specified in FAA Order JO 7340.2, Contractions, followed by the trip or the flight number.

    EXAMPLE-

    N12345
    TN5552Q
    AAL192
    LN751B

    NOTE-

    The letter “L” must not be entered in Item 2 of the flight plan for air carrier or air taxi MEDEVAC aircraft. Include the word “MEDEVAC” in the remarks section of the flight plan.

    1. U.S. Military Aircraft.
    1. Use the military abbreviation followed by the last five digits of the aircraft's number. For certain tactical mission aircraft, enter the assigned three-to-six letter code word followed by a one-to-four digit number. (See TBL 5-2-1.)

    TBL 5-2-1
    Military

    Abbreviation

    Military Service

    A

    USAF

    C

    Coast Guard

    E

    Air Evacuation

    G

    Air/Army National Guard

    L

    LOGAIR (USAF contract)

    R

    Army

    RCH

    REACH (USAF Air Mobility Command)

    S

    Special Air Mission

    VM

    Marine Corps

    VV

    Navy

    1. Aircraft carrying the President, Vice President, and/or their family members will use the identifiers in the following tables. (See TBL 5-2-2 and TBL 5-2-3.)

    TBL 5-2-2
    President and Family

    Service

    President

    Family

    Air Force

    AF1

    EXEC1F

    Marine

    VM1

    EXEC1F

    Navy

    VV1

    EXEC1F

    Army

    RR1

    EXEC1F

    Coast Guard

    C1

    EXEC1F

    Guard

    G1

    EXEC1F

    Commercial

    EXEC1

    EXEC1F

    TBL 5-2-3
    Vice President and Family

    Service

    Vice President

    Family

    Air Force

    AF2

    EXEC2F

    Marine

    VM2

    EXEC2F

    Navy

    VV2

    EXEC2F

    Army

    RR2

    EXEC2F

    Coast Guard

    C2

    EXEC2F

    Guard

    G2

    EXEC2F

    Commercial

    EXEC2

    EXEC2F

    1. Canadian Military Aircraft. The abbreviations must be followed by a number group not to exceed four digits. (See TBL 6-2-3.)

    TBL 5-2-4
    Canadian Military

    Abbreviation

    Military Service

    CFC

    Canadian Forces

    CTG

    Canadian Coast Guard

    1. Item 3. Aircraft Type. Insert the standard aircraft type designator, in accordance with FAA Order JO 7360.1, Aircraft Type Designators.
    1. Prefix to Aircraft Type (one-to-two alphanumeric characters). For IFR operations, if the aircraft's weight class is heavy, indicate this with the prefix “H.” If a formation flight is planned, enter the number and type of aircraft; for example, 2H/B52.
    2. Suffix to Aircraft Type (one alpha character). Indicate for IFR operations the aircraft's radar transponder, DME, or RNAV (includes LORAN) capability by adding the appropriate symbol preceded by a slant (/). (See TBL 5-2-5.)

    TBL 5-2-5
    Suffix to Aircraft Type

    Navigation Capability

    Transponder Capability

    Suffix

    RVSM

    No GNSS, No RNAV

    Transponder with Mode C

    /W

    RNAV, No GNSS

    Transponder with Mode C

    /Z

    GNSS

    Transponder with Mode C

    /L

     

    No RVSM

    No DME

    No transponder

    /X

    Transponder with no Mode C

    /T

    Transponder with Mode C

    /U

    DME

    No transponder

    /D

    Transponder with no Mode C

    /B

    Transponder with Mode C

    /A

    TACAN

    No transponder

    /M

    Transponder with no Mode C

    /N

    Transponder with Mode C

    /P

    RNAV, No GNSS

    No transponder

    /Y

    Transponder with no Mode C

    /C

    Transponder with Mode C

    /I

    GNSS

    No transponder

    /V

    Transponder with no Mode C

    /S

    Transponder with Mode C

    /G

    NOTE-

    The /E and /F suffixes will only be used by aircraft operating to and from airports within the U.S., unless authorized by the controlling authority.

    REFERENCE-

    FAA Order JO 7110.65, Para 2-3-8 and TBL 2-3-10, Aircraft Equipment Suffixes.

    1. Item 4. True Airspeed (TAS Knots). Enter two-to- four digits for TAS in knots; M followed by three digits for Mach number; or SC for “speed classified.”
    2. Item 5. Departure Point. Enter two-to-twelve alphanumeric and slant characters for name or identifier of the departure airport or point over which the flight plan is activated.
    3. Item 6. Departure Time. Enter departure time in UTC.
    4. Item 7. Cruising Altitude. Proposed altitude or flight level using two-to-seven characters; for example, 80 or 080, OTP, OTP/125, VFR, ABV/060.
    5. Item 8. Route of Flight. Enter identifiers for airways or jet routes to clearly indicate the proposed flight path. For direct flight, use names or identifiers of navigation aids, Navigation Reference System (NRS) waypoints, and geographical points or coordinates. If more than one airway or jet route is to be flown, clearly indicate the transition points.

    NOTE-

    1. On some direct flights beyond the departure center's airspace, it may be necessary to include a fix in the adjacent center's airspace or latitude/longitude coordinates, as appropriate, to facilitate computer acceptance. Local procedures should be applied to these special situations.
    2. NRS waypoints consist of five alphanumeric characters, which include the ICAO Flight Information Region (FIR) identifier, followed by the letter corresponding to the FIR subset (ARTCC area for the contiguous U.S.), the latitude increment in single digit or group form, and the longitude increment.

    EXAMPLE-

    “KD34U”

    1. Item 9. Destination. Enter two-to-twelve alphanumeric and/or slant characters for name or identifier of the destination airport or point over which the flight plan is to be canceled.
    2. Item 10. Estimated Time En route. Enter in hours and minutes the total elapsed time between departure and destination in four-digit format, for example, 0215.
    3. Item 11. Remarks. Information necessary for ATC, search and rescue operations, and any other data pertinent to the flight or provided by the pilot. For RM: field only - Use 1-80 characters beginning with *, #, $, or %. (See TBL 5-2-6.)

    TBL 5-2-6

    *

    transmit remarks to all centers.

    #

    transmit remarks to departure centers only.

    $

    transmit remarks only to those addresses in the CP field of the flight notification message.

    %

    for remarks not to be transmitted.

    1. Item 12. Fuel on Board. Enter in hours and minutes in four-digit format; for example, 0330.
    2. Item 13. Alternate Airport/s. Enter the location identifier if specified by the pilot.
    3. Item 14. Pilot's Name, Telephone Number, Aircraft's Home Base. Self-explanatory.

    NOTE-

    Pilot's name not required if BASEOPS/Aircraft Operators name and contact data is provided.

    1. Item 15. Number Aboard. Self-explanatory.
    2. Item 16. Color of Aircraft. Use authorized contractions when available. (See TBL 5-2-7.)

    TBL 5-2-7
    Code and Color

    Code

    Color

     

    Code

    Color

    A

    Amber

    B

    Blue

    BE

    Beige

    BK

    Black

    BR

    Brown

    G

    Green

    GD

    Gold

    GY

    Gray

    M

    Maroon

    O

    Orange

    OD

    Olive Drab

    P

    Purple

    PK

    Pink

    R

    Red

    S

    Silver

    T

    Tan

    TQ

    Turquoise

    V

    Violet

    W

    White

    Y

    Yellow

    NOTE-

    1. For ICAO flight plans, see Appendix A.
    2. Local procedures may be developed for use on the reverse side of FAA Form 7233-1.
    1. 5-2-2. OUTBOUNDS DEPARTING FROM OUTSIDE FLIGHT PLAN AREA

    For domestic flight plans, accept flight plans regardless of departure point within the NAS. Forward VFR flight plan proposals for aircraft proposing to depart from outside the facility's flight plan area to the tie-in facility/sector for the departure point. Insert the originator of the flight plan into the “Remarks” field. Transmit the proposed flight plan in the following format:

    1. Type of flight.
    2. Aircraft identification.
    3. Aircraft type.
    4. Departure point.
    5. Destination.
    6. Proposed departure time/ETE.
    7. Remarks.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF PAENYFYX
    DTG PAFAYFYX
    VFR N1234 BE9L ENA FAI P1330/0130 $FP PAFAYFYX

    NOTE-

    For civil flight movement messages with remarks, precede the remarks with a dollar symbol ($).

    1. 5-2-3. FLIGHT PLANS WITH AREA NAVIGATION (RNAV) ROUTES IN DOMESTIC U.S. AIRSPACE

    Use FAA Form 7233-4, International Flight Plan, and use the following guidelines for pilots filing flight plans in domestic U.S. airspace if automatic assignment of any of the following RNAV routes are desired:

    1. RNAV standard instrument departure (SID);
    2. RNAV standard terminal arrival route (STAR); and/or
    3. RNAV point-to-point (PTP).
      ICAO Flight Plan procedures are located in Appendix A.

    Section 3. IFR Flight Plan Handling

    1. 5-3-1. IFR FLIGHT PLANS

    IFR flight plans should consist of items 1 through 17 of FAA Form 7233-1 or electronic equivalent. Items 1 through 11 must be transmitted to the ARTCC as part of the IFR flight plan proposal. Items 12 through 17 must be retained by the FSS or in the operational system and be available upon request.

    NOTE-

    1. Part-time FSSs must forward items 1 through 17 in accordance with Paragraph 5-1-7, Part-time FSS Closure Action.
    2. Procedures for automatic assignment of RNAV routes are contained in Paragraph 5-2-3, Flight Plans with Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes in Domestic U.S. Airspace.
    1. 5-3-2. NOTIFYING ARTCC

    Transmit flight plans and flight plan amendments to the ARTCC for the departure point. Facilities should use FAA Order JO 7350.9, Location Identifiers, or the appropriate aeronautical charts to determine the ARTCC to which each transmission must be made. Transmit flight plans (if necessary) and flight plan amendments via interphone to the flight data position (error referral position) or departure sector when the aircraft's proposed departure time is 46 minutes or less from transmittal time. Advise the ARTCC's departure sector or flight data position (error referral position), via interphone, when a message is received indicating ineligibility or a response is not received via data terminal within 10 minutes. Transmit flight plans as follows:

    1. When multiple (two or more) flight plans are received from the same aircraft, or for flight plans which propose alternating VFR and IFR, stopover, or terminal area delay, the station receiving the flight plans transmits separate flight plans to the appropriate ARTCCs for each IFR portion or segment.
    2. Transmit flight plans specifying special use airspace delays (MOAs, warning areas, restricted areas, ATCAA) as in subpara 5-3-2 a except when letters of agreement specify otherwise.
    3. Aerial refueling delays, or any other en route delays not covered in subparas 5-3-2 a or b and not involving a change of altitude stratum, do not require separate messages. Delay information must be filed within the route of flight. If a change of altitude stratum is indicated, transmit separate messages as in subparas 5-3-2 a or b.
    4. When a composite, stopover, or terminal area delay flight plan is revised:
    1. Before departure, transmit the information to the original addressees plus any new addressees.
    2. After departure, transmit the information to all new addresses that are affected by the change.
    1. When a flight is to depart after 0500 hours local time on the day following the filing of the flight plan, do not transmit the flight plan to the ARTCC until after 0000 hours local time.

    NOTE-

    In the event of a time zone difference between the station and the associated ARTCC, use the ARTCC's local time in determining transmission time.

    1. Address all IFR flight plan messages to the ARTCC serving the point of departure and all concerned oceanic and non-conterminous air traffic service (ATS) units, except FAA ATCTs.

    NOTE-

    The ARTCC within whose control area IFR flight is proposed to begin will forward the proposed tower en route flight plan data to the appropriate departure terminal facility.

    1. For flights inbound to the conterminous U.S. from Alaska or Hawaii, address only the first conterminous U.S. ARTCC; for example, for a proposed flight from Sitka to Houston, address PAZAZQZX, CZVRZQZX, and KZSEZQZX.

    REFERENCE-

    FAA Order JO 7110.65, Para 2-2-2, Forwarding Information.

    1. 5-3-3. IFR FLIGHT PLAN CONTROL MESSAGES

    Transmit all proposed IFR flight plan messages to the ARTCC within whose control area IFR flight is proposed to begin.

    1. Communications Functions. Flight plan data messages must be addressed to the computer only. All other types of messages for ARTCC attention must be addressed to the Flight Data position only. Acknowledgements for all numbered messages will be received from the computer or the Flight Data position indicating receipt by the ARTCC, but not necessarily computer acceptance. (See TBL 5-3-1.)

    TBL 5-3-1
    ARTCC ID & Computer Flight Data

    ARTCC

    ID

    Computer

    Flight Data

    Albuquerque

    ZAB

    KZABZQZX

    KZABZRZX

    Atlanta

    ZTL

    KZTLZQZX

    KZTLZRZX

    Anchorage

    ZAN

    PAZAZQZX

    PAZAZRZX

    Boston

    ZBW

    KZBWZQZX

    KZBWZRZX

    Chicago

    ZAU

    KZAUZQZX

    KZAUZRZX

    Cleveland

    ZOB

    KZOBZQZX

    KZOBZRZX

    Denver

    ZDV

    KZDVZQZX

    KZDVZRZX

    Fort Worth

    ZFW

    KZFWZQZX

    KZFWZRZX

    Honolulu

    ZHN

    PHZHZQZX

    PHZHZRZX

    Houston

    ZHU

    KZHUZQZX

    KZHUZRZX

    Indianapolis

    ZID

    KZIDZQZX

    KZIDZRZX

    Jacksonville

    ZJX

    KZJXZQZX

    KZJXZRZX

    Kansas City

    ZKC

    KZKCZQZX

    KZKCZRZX

    Los Angeles

    ZLA

    KZLAZQZX

    KZLAZRZX

    Memphis

    ZME

    KZMEZQZX

    KZMEZRZX

    Miami

    ZMA

    KZMAZQZX

    KZMAZRZX

    Minneapolis

    ZMP

    KZMPZQZX

    KZMPZRZX

    New York

    ZNY

    KZNYZQZX

    KZNYZRZX

    Oakland

    ZOA

    KZ0AZQZX

    KZOAZRZX

    Salt Lake

    ZLC

    KZLCZQZX

    KZLCZRZX

    San Juan

    ZLU

    TJZSZQZX

    TJZSZRZX

    Seattle

    ZSE

    KZSEZQZX

    KZSEZRZX

    Washington

    ZDC

    KZDCZQZX

    KZDCZRZX

    1. Adhere to a fixed order of data. Do not exceed the stated maximum number of characters or elements allowed for each field in messages addressed to an ARTCC computer. Flight plans filed containing more than the stated character maximums should be sent using the ARTCC flight data address.
    2. For manual entry into Service B, one space character must be entered at the end of each data field. The first data field of a message need not be preceded by a space. The last data field of a message need not be followed by a space.
    3. Each field of data is composed of one or more elements. Discrete elements of information within a field are separated by delimiters, generally slashes (/) or periods (ABC..DEF).
    4. Messages addressed using a ARTCC flight data address (see TBL 5-3-1) are not processed by the ARTCC computer. Response and/or interpretation of these messages are dependent on flight data personnel action. The prime consideration of these types of messages must be the readability of the transmitted data.
    5. All domestic flight data processing computers have the capability to return acknowledgments to the source and, depending on local adaption, return error messages and accept amendments. Notify the appropriate ARTCC Data Systems Specialist or Primary A position when it is suspected that a flight plan has been erroneously rejected by the computer.
    6. IFR flight plans specifying stopovers or terminal area delays require separate messages sent to the appropriate ARTCCs for each segment. Unless otherwise covered by a letter of agreement, treat flight plans proposing SUA delays in the same manner. Separate messages are also required for any other en route delays if a change of altitude stratum is proposed at the delay point. See subparagraph 6-3-4n8(b)(2) for delays not involving a change of altitude stratum.
    7. Some fields contain the necessary functions to operate the computer data terminal adapters and are designated by alpha characters (HIO..RAW- ER.V23.EUG/D0+30..16S). Do not separate these fields with spaces.
    1. 5-3-4. IFR FLIGHT PLAN CONTROL MESSAGE FORMAT

    For En Route Automation System Flight Data Processing (EAS FDP) acceptance, the complete message contents, the order of data, the number of characters allowed within any data field or element, and any associated operational procedures or restrictions are as follows (as used here, “field” refers to EAS FDP field):

    NOTE-

    Detailed operating instructions for processing IFR Flight Plans are contained in the operational system instructions.

    1. Start of Message Code (Field A). (New Line Key)
    2. Preamble Line (Field B). Consists of originator, priority, and addressee(s).
    3. Originator Line (Field C). Consists of a six-digit date-time group and the eight-character originator identifier.
    4. End of Line Function (Field E). Same as subpara 6-3-4a.
    5. Source Identification (Field 00). Nine or ten characters required followed by a space character in the following order:
    1. The three-character address of the originating facility.
    2. Four characters (digits) to indicate the time (in UTC) the flight plan was composed by the originator.
    3. Three characters (digits) representing the number of the message; for example, 021. It is recommended that numbering systems be restarted with 001 at the beginning of each day (0000Z).

    NOTE-

    There are no spaces between characters in subparas 6-3-4e1, 2, and 3.

    1. Message Type (Field 01). The letters “FP” followed by a space character.
    2. Aircraft Identification (Field 02). Consists of two-to-seven alphanumeric characters followed by a space character. The first character of the identification must be a letter.
    1. Phrases such as FLYNET, Snow Time, etc., which do not identify specific aircraft but are supplemental data defining a special mission or function, must be contained in remarks (Field 11).
    2. For foreign aircraft flight identifications with a numeral as the first character, insert a Q as the first character and explain in the remarks section by listing the actual flight identification.

    NOTE-

    Use caution not to modify existing remarks.

    1. Aircraft Data (Field 03). Consists of two-to-nine characters followed by a space character. Aircraft data within the field may vary from one-to-three elements consisting of:
    1. Number of aircraft (when more than one) and/or the heavy aircraft indicator. For heavy aircraft the indicator is “H/.” This element contains a maximum of two characters followed by a slash.

    EXAMPLE-

    2/F15
    3H/B52
    10/F18

    1. Type of Aircraft. Insert the standard aircraft type designator, in accordance with FAA Order JO 7360.1, Aircraft Type Designators.
    2. Equipment Suffix. This element consists of a slash (/) followed by one letter which is one of the approved designators identifying transponder and/or navigation gear.
    1. Airspeed (Field 05). Consists of two-to-four characters followed by a space character. This field must indicate the filed true airspeed in knots or Mach number.

    EXAMPLE-

    350
    M075

    1. Departure Point or Coordination Fix (Field 06). Consists of two-to-twelve characters followed by a space character. This field contains the departure point or fix at which an aircraft will pick up IFR. It must be a fix, not an airway. For proposed departures, it must match the first element in the route of flight; and for IFR pickups, it must match either the first element in the route of flight or the third element if the ./. or VFR is used as the second element.
    2. Proposed Departure Time (Field 07). Consists of five or seven characters followed by a space character. This field contains the letter “P” followed by a four or six digit time group in UTC.
    3. Requested Altitude (Field 09). Consists of two-to-seven characters followed by a space character. Altitudes or flight levels, as appropriate, must be expressed in hundreds of feet, but without leading zeros. The letters “OTP” must be entered in this field to indicate a requested altitude of VFR conditions-on-top. If a VFR conditions-on-top altitude is provided, it must be entered as “OTP/XXX where “XXX” is a VFR altitude. Blocked altitudes are indicated by entering the lower altitude of the requested block, the letter “B,” and the higher altitude of the block; for example, 80B100, 240B270, with no spaces.
    4. End of Line (New Line Key) (Field E). The first occurrence of Field E must always follow Field 09 of the message. Any time a subsequent end of line becomes necessary, if used within Field 10, it must be preceded by the appropriate element separator (not a space). If used within Field 11, Field E may be entered at any point within the remarks sequence.
    5. Route of Flight (Field 10). The route of flight consists of departure point or pickup point (PUP), the route of flight, and normally a destination followed by a space character.
    1. Field 10 is a fixed sequence field and must begin with a fix; for example, fix, airway, fix, airway, etc. The last element may be a fix or one of the route elements VFR, DVFR, or XXX (incomplete route indicator). An element is separated from another element by a period character.
    2. When consecutive fix elements or route elements are filed, the fixed sequence format is maintained by inserting two period characters between the filed Field 10 elements; for example, fix..fix or airway..airway.
    3. When a pilot files an airway..airway combination, obtain the point of transition and insert it in the transmitted flight plan; for example, SGF.J105..J24.STL.J24. The foregoing does not apply if the first encountered fix happens to be the next filed junction point within the route.

    NOTE-

    Airway..airway combinations in the route of flight require a defined junction (either five-character alphanumeric, location identification, or pre-defined fix-radial-distance).

    1. The slash character (/) is used to file a latitude/longitude fix or in describing an ETE.
    2. The maximum number of filed field elements for computer-addressed flight plans is 40. Double period insertions do not count against the 40-element limitation. Transmit flight plans filed exceeding the route element limitation to the ARTCC, not its computer.
    3. Fix Descriptions. A fix must be filed in one of the following ways:
    1. Fix Name. Domestic, Canadian, and International identifiers of two-to-five alphanumeric characters.
    2. Fix Radial Distance (FRD). Consists of eight-to-eleven alphanumeric characters in the following sequence: Two-to-five characters identifying a NAVAID, three characters of azimuth expressed in degrees magnetic, and three characters of distance expressed in nautical miles from the NAVAID. Zeros preceding a significant character must be entered before the azimuth and distance components as required to assure the transmission of three characters for each.
    3. Latitude/Longitude. Consists of nine-to-twelve characters entered as follows: The latitude must appear as the first component as four numbers (trailing zeros required) followed by an optional letter “N” or “S.” If the optional letter is omitted, north is understood. Latitude must be separated from longitude with a slash (/) element separator. Longitude must appear as the second component as four or five digits (trailing zeros required, leading zero optional) followed by an optional letter “W” or “E.” If the optional letter is omitted, west is understood.
    4. Navigation Reference System (NRS) Waypoints. NRS waypoints consist of five alphanumeric characters, which include the ICAO FIR identifier, followed by the letter corresponding to the FIR subset (ARTCC area for the contiguous U.S.), the latitude increment in single digit or group form, and the longitude increment.

    EXAMPLE-

    “KD34U”

    1. Route Descriptions. A route must be filed in one of the following ways:
    1. Airway. The official airway designator must be filed.
    2. Coded Routes. Coded routes are a shorthand method of describing a route segment or segments which may have an altitude profile described, an adapted airspeed within the route, re-entry or loop routes as an option, or a time delay at a fix within the route as an option. Some of the principal uses of coded routes are as follows:
    1. Instrument Departures (DP). DP, if used, must be filed by the computer code designator as the second element of Field 10 and be followed by the transition or exit fix.
    2. Standard Terminal Arrivals (STARs). STAR, if used, must be filed by the computer code designator as the next to last element of Field 10 and immediately follow the entry or transition fix.
    3. Published Radials. Published radials (for example, within a preferred route) are considered airways. Do not file unpublished radials.

    EXAMPLE-

    .JFK053..DPK017
    .RBV020

    1. Military Routes. Certain military routes (for example, MTR and air refueling tracks/anchors), are considered coded routes. The route designator must be preceded and followed by the entry and exit fixes in terms of fix/radial/distance (FRD), and re-entry information may be suffixed to certain military coded routes as follows:
    1. The entry and exit fix must be associated with a fix on the route, and the entry fix must be prior to the exit fix on the route.

    EXAMPLE-

    TNP355025..IR252
    PKE107012

    1. Routes having re-entries for a single strategic training range (STR) site must contain the entry of alternate entry fix in terms of FRD, the route designator followed immediately by a plus sign (+), either the letter “R” (1st STR site) or “S” (2nd STR site), and a digit indicating the number of re-entries.

    EXAMPLE-

    (FRD) IR240+R2 (FRD)
    (FRD) IR240+S3 (FRD)

    1. Routes having re-entries for two STR sites must contain the entry/alternate fix in terms of FRD, the route designator followed immediately by a plus sign (+), the letter “R,” and a digit indicating the number of re-entries on the first STR site, immediately followed by second plus sign (+), the letter “S,” and a digit indicating the number of re-entries on the second STR site.

    EXAMPLE-

    (FRD) IR240+R2+S3 (FRD)

    1. STR routes must be entered and exited at the respective primary fix. Alternate STR routes must be entered/exited at the alternate entry/exit fix. The routes must be identified by an individual name.

    EXAMPLE-

    (FRD) IR240+R2 (FRD) (Primary)
    (FRD) IR240A+R2 (FRD) (Alternate)

    1. North American Routes (NAR). NAR routes are numerically coded over existing airways and route systems from and to specific coastal fixes serving the North Atlantic.

    EXAMPLE-

    .NA9
    .NA50

    1. Stereo Routes. A stereo route must specify a pre-stored stereo tag. An “FP” message may be entered with a stereo tag as the only Field 10 entry, which causes the Field 10 data stored for the stereo tag to be substituted for the stereo tag and processed as the filed Field 10. Additionally, the filed departure point (Field 06) must agree with the stored departure point.
    2. Incomplete Route Indicator (XXX). When XXX, the incomplete route indicator appears in Field 10, the element preceding the XXX element must be a fix.
    3. VFR or DVFR element. When VFR or DVFR is the second element of Field 10, the filed fix following VFR or DVFR must be internal to the ARTCC's area to whom the flight plan was initially submitted. When VFR or DVFR is other than the second element in Field 10, the element preceding the VFR or DVFR must be a filed fix.
    1. Fix Suffix.
    1. En Route Delay Suffix consists of an element separator (/), followed by the letter D, followed by the hours and minutes separated by a plus sign (+). Must be appended to a fix.

    EXAMPLE-

    .STL/D1+30
    .PKE107012/D2+05

    1. Use of this suffix is limited to the following cases:
    1. Aerial Refueling Tracks and Anchors. The suffix is appended to the entry fix.

    EXAMPLE-

    .ICT248055/D0+30.AR330

    1. En route delays not involving a change of altitude stratum and not involving a stopover, terminal area delay, or SUA delay unless specifically covered by a letter of agreement with the receiving ARTCC.
    1. ETE Suffix. Consists of an element separator (/) and four digits appended to the destination. Leading zeros are required, and the time en route is expressed in hours and minutes.

    EXAMPLE-

    .STL/0105

    1. A period is not required after the last element of Field 10. If remarks (Field 11) are present, a space is required after the last element of Field 10. If remarks are not present, no space is required and Field F (End of Message) should be the next entry.
    1. Remarks (Field 11). Consists of the appropriate remarks code character and the remarks. Spaces are permitted within the remarks field to separate words or contractions. Remarks must be transmitted in Field 11 whenever a pilot files the information on the flight plan. A remark is required whenever there is a modification to the flight plan by the specialist.
    1. If it is necessary to make modifications to the filed route of flight for the purpose of achieving computer acceptance of the input due, for example, to correct a fix or an airway identification, “FRC,” meaning “Full Route Clearance Necessary,” or “FRC/(fix),” will be added to the remarks. “FRC” or “FRC/(fix)” must always be the first item of intra-center remarks. When “FRC” or “FRC/(fix)” appears on a flight progress strip, the controller issuing the ATC clearance to the aircraft must issue a full route clearance to the specified fix, or if no fix is specified, for the entire route. “FRC” or “FRC/(fix)” must always be first in Remarks (Field 11).

    NOTE-

    INPUT OPERATORS ARE LIMITED TO MAKING ONLY THOSE CHANGES REQUIRED FOR COMPUTER ACCEPTANCE. Modifications, such as those to conform with traffic flows and preferred/recommended routings, must only be made by the pilot or his/her operations office or the controller responsible for initiating the clearance to the aircraft.

    1. In the case of applicable military flights requesting that the flight plan is not passed to air defense radar (NOPAR), NOPAR must be the first item in Remarks (Field 11).
    2. Remarks for military flight plans filing an IR route must contain the IR route designator, entry time prefaced by the letter “E,” exit time prefaced by the letter “X,” and MARSA when applicable. Remarks for flight plans filing a terminal area delay must contain the airport identifier at which the delay will occur, followed by the letter “D,” followed by the duration of the delay in hours plus minutes, followed by the destination airport. These should be the first item in Remarks (Field 11).
    3. When a pilot files an FAA-assigned three-letter company designator, if the designator and/or radiotelephony is new or changed, the authorized radiotelephony call sign must be included in the remarks field for at least 60 days following the effective date. In cases where there is no three-letter identifier assignment or a three-letter identifier is used in a medical emergency, the assigned radiotelephony must be included in the remarks field.

    NOTE-

    1. A radiotelephony may be assigned by the FAA without assigning a three-letter identifier. Special radiotelephony assignments are usually temporary and for commemorative flights, large number of aircraft in an organized race, aircraft operating during an emergency or disaster condition, or aircraft requiring special handling for test purposes.
    2. The pilot is responsible for knowing when it is appropriate to file the radiotelephony in remarks under the 60 day rule or for special radiotelephony assignments. The pilot may also request that the radiotelephony be filed in remarks due to special needs of the flight.
    1. End of Message Function (Field F). Consists of enter function.
    1. 5-3-5. ADDITIONAL MESSAGES

    The following messages are eligible for input to ARTCC computers via Service B, in addition to the flight plan (“FP”) message:

    1. Remove Strip (RS). The purpose of the RS message input is to advise the computer that data on a particular flight is no longer valid and in effect cancels the flight plan and removes it from computer storage.
    1. Eligibility. RS messages may be entered only for flight plans which:
    1. Are proposed flights.
    2. Have been previously entered by the same source entering the RS message.
    3. The flight plan is inactive; for example, a departure strip must not yet have been printed. Otherwise, the following rejection message is returned: “REJECT--NOT YOUR CONTROL.”
    1. Format. Fields 01 (Message type) and 02 (Aircraft Identification) are required.

    EXAMPLE-

    RS SWA138

    1. Amendment (AM) Message. The purpose of the AM message is to change data previously stored in the ARTCC computer.
    1. Eligibility. Same as for the RS message (above).
    2. Format. AM messages sent to the ARTCC computer must follow a specific format. First, the field to be amended must be identified, then the amended information given. The ARTCC computer recognizes the following fields by either number or name: (See TBL 5-3-2.)

    TBL 5-3-2
    Field Number and Name

    Field

    Field Number

    Field Name

    Aircraft Identification

    02

    AID

    Aircraft Type

    03

    TYP

    Speed

    05

    SPD

    Departure/Coordination Pt.

    06

    FIX

    Proposed Time

    07

    TIM

    Altitude

    09

    RAL

    Route of Flight

    10

    RTE

    Remarks

    11

    RMK

    1. Restrictions.
    1. If Field 02 is to be amended, no other field may be amended in the same message. If Field 02 and other fields are to be amended, send an RS message and re-enter the entire corrected flight plan. If an attempt is made to amend Field 02 within a multiple amendment message or to amend Field 02 to M, the following rejection message is returned: “REJECT—INVALID AMENDMENT.”

    NOTE-

    Alternate procedure is to send two amendments - the first amends field 2; the second amends the other field or fields.

    1. Field 07 Amendments. An attempt to amend Field 07 to anything other than a P-time is not allowed. If such an amendment is attempted, the following error message is returned: “COFIE INVALID TIME PREFIX.”
    2. Amendment to Fields 06, 07, and 10: Where Fields 06, 07, and 10 are amended with a single AM message, the following rules apply:
    1. The amended Field 06 replaces the previously stored coordination fix (Field 06).
    2. The amended Field 07, with appropriate letter prefix, replaces the previously stored coordination time (Field 07).
    3. The amended route data (Field 10) may completely replace the previously filed Field 10 or may be merged with the filed Field 10.
    4. If the last element of the amended route data is followed by a destination indicator, this last element becomes the new destination fix.
    5. When amended route data is merged with filed data, it replaces all data between the departure point and the first non-amended element remaining in the field. The last element of the amended data must match the first element of the remaining non-amended data, otherwise the following rejection message is returned: “REJECT--(last element) CANNOT MERGE.”
    1. Amendment to Field 10 Only. Except as permitted above, a Field 10 amendment must be the only field amended; no other field may be amended with the same message. Otherwise, the following is returned: “REJECT—INVALID AMENDMENT.”

    EXAMPLE-

    Message Type

    Aircraft Identification

    Field
    to be
    Revised

    New Field Data

    Field to be Revised

    New Field Data

    AM

    TWA179

    07

    P0800

    08

    350

    AM

    UAL466

    07

    0300

    AM

    AAL4355

    10

    ORD.J60 .DEN

    1. Correction Message (CM). When the ARTCC computer detects an error in a flight plan, an error message is generated to the sender when the sender is within the departure ARTCC's adapted boundaries.

    NOTE-

    These procedures may not apply to all operational systems.

    1. Eligibility. CM messages may be entered only for the period for which the departure ARTCC's program is adapted, normally 5 minutes. After that time, the flight plan in error drops out to the ARTCC Primary A position for re-entry. The sender has primary responsibility for corrective action.

    NOTE-

    Error messages are generated only on messages from sending stations within the adaptation parameters of the departure ARTCC and for only that portion of the route within that ARTCC's adapted boundaries. Other flight plans in error are referred to a Primary A position.

    1. Format. Responses to error messages must be transmitted in the form of a CM message within the time parameters adapted for your ARTCC.

    EXAMPLE-

    ARTCC-Generated Error Message:

    Sending Facility

    MSG Type

    MSG NR

    Field in Error

    Data in Error

    Reason

    DCA

    Error

    123

    08

    9A

    FORMAT

    CM Format:

    Field 00

    MSG Type

    Correct Data

    DCA 1820123

    CM

    090

    1. When a CM message in response to an error message results in any change to a pilot-filed Field 06 (Departure Point) or Field 10 (Route of Flight) once the flight plan has been accepted, an AM message must be sent to add a field 11 intra-ARTCC remark. In remarks, insert “FRC PILOT FILED (original data).”
    2. Should a “NOT YOUR CONTROL” response be received, do not retransmit the flight plan or the AM. Confirm ARTCC receipt of the flight plan or AM (FRC/REMARKS) via interphone with the Primary A position. (See TBL 5-3-3.)

    TBL 5-3-3
    Computer Flight Data Input

    COMPUTER FLIGHT DATA INPUT CHART

    Field

    Element

    Example

    Requirements

    A

    Start of Message (SOM code)

    New Line Key

    Required for SOM recognition.

    B

    Preamble Line

    FF KZFWZQZX

    Provides priority, and addressee.

    C

    Originator

    DTG KMLCYFYX

    Required for ending the message header.

    D

    End of Line

    (New Line Key)

    EOL.

    E

    End of Message

    (Enter Function)

    End of Message.

    1. 5-3-6. COORDINATE RNAV ROUTES
    1. When accepting flight plans containing coordinate RNAV routes, ensure that the route of flight after the departure fix is defined by latitude/longitude coordinates and a fix identifier.
    2. The arrival fix must be identified by both the latitude/longitude coordinates and the fix identifier.

    EXAMPLE-

    (1)

    (2)

    (3)

    (4)

    (4)

    (5)

    MIA

    SRQ

    3407/10615

    3407/11546

    TNP

    LAX

    1. Departure airport.
    2. Departure fix.
    3. Intermediate fixes defined by latitude/longitude coordinates.
    4. Arrival fix for the destination airport in terms of both the latitude/longitude coordinates and the fix identifier.
    5. Destination airport.

    Section 4. Flight Plan Handling

    1. 5-4-1. FLIGHT PLAN ACTIVATION
    1. If a departure report has not been received within a predetermined time, but not less than 1 hour of the proposed departure time, and specific arrangements have not been made to activate the flight plan, cancel and store in the history file.
    2. The FSS history file is used for statistical and historical purposes. Movement messages, pilot briefings, and aircraft contacts are stored in the history files automatically and retained for 15 days.
    3. When a pilot reports an actual departure time of more than 2 hours prior to the current clock time, request an updated ETE based on the aircraft's present position. Amend the ETE in the existing flight plan and activate the flight plan using the current time as the time of departure and inform the pilot of the new ETA.
    1. 5-4-2. DEPARTURE REPORT MESSAGE

    When a pilot activates a flight plan with other than the facility holding the flight plan, transmit a numbered message to the departure tie-in facility.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KRCAYXYX
    DTG KHONYFYX
    HON001 RCA
    N98765 D1645 RCA ALW

    1. 5-4-3. ACKNOWLEDGING NUMBERED MESSAGES

    Acknowledge a numbered message as soon as practical after receipt. Prefix the acknowledgement with the letter “R” followed by a space and then the 3-digit message number.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KMMVYFYX
    DTG KRNOYFYX
    R 001

    1. 5-4-4. FLIGHT NOTIFICATION MESSAGE
    1. When a departure report is received or the pilot requests an assumed departure, transmit a flight notification message to the destination tie-in facility as specified in FAA Order JO 7350.9, Location Identifiers. Telephone or interphone, when available, may be used for flights of 30 minutes or less. The flight notification message must contain the following information:
    1. Type of flight plan (VFR or IFR).
    2. Aircraft identification.
    3. Aircraft type.
    4. Departure point.
    5. Destination.
    6. ETA (If more than 24 hours, may use DTG).
    7. Remarks, preceded by a $ sign (as appropriate).

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KBOIYFYX
    DTG KCDCYFYX
    VFR N2346F AC11/U PVU BOI 1348 $ASMD DEP

    NOTE-

    The operational system will automatically format the required items and transmit the flight notification message when activated.

    1. When the proposed flight plan is received from another FSS, base operations (BASOPS), or direct user access terminal (DUAT) vendor and the departure facility has only partial flight plan data, add a remark indicating the Service B address of the facility holding the complete flight plan. Operational systems will automatically add this to the “Remarks” section of the flight plan.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KBOIYFYX
    DTG KCDCYFYX
    VFR N12345 C182/U PVU BOI 1958 $FPKIADXCLX

    1. If the pilot elects to close the flight plan with a facility other than the designated tie-in facility, send the flight notification message with remarks to both tie-in facilities; for example, FIRIV FAI. The designated tie-in facility must assume both destination and search and rescue responsibility.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF PAENYFYX PAFAYFYX
    DTG KJNUYFYX
    VFR N2346F AC11 JNU FAI 1303
    $FIRIV ENA

    NOTE-

    The operational system will auto address to the tie-in facility. Because the pilot elected to FIRIV with ENA (a facility other than the tie-in facility), the message must also be manually addressed to ENA.

    1. The facility with which the pilot elects to close the flight plan must forward a numbered closure message to the designated tie-in facility.
    2. On civil flight plans, if the pilot advises of stopover points, show these in remarks.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KBOIYFYX
    DTG KCDCYFYX
    VFR N12345 C182/U PVU BOI 1958 $LNDG
    TWF

    1. On military flight plans, in remarks use coded data pertinent to services, passengers, or cargo. In the absence of remarks, enter the letter “N” (meaning none) in the remarks field.

    REFERENCE-

    DOD Flight Information Publication, General Planning Document.

    1. Flight notification messages with remarks generate an alert at designated workstations.
    2. When landing at a civil airport, if there are no remarks with the flight notification message, it is placed on the Inbound List with no alerts for notification purposes.
    3. When landing at a military airport, all flight notification messages generate an alert.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KRCAYXYX
    DTG KRIUYFYX
    IFR DECAL01 T18/R SMF RCA 0135
    $AP3NP3S

    FF KBOIYFYX
    DTG KCDCYFYX
    VFR R54321 2/UH1/U SLC BOI 1943 $N

    1. Address military stopover flight notification messages to and obtain acknowledgements from the destination tie-in facility serving all destinations.
    1. For the first leg, transmit the items in subparas 5-4-4a and 5-4-4f.
    2. For each subsequent leg, transmit the destination, ETE, and remarks applicable to that leg only, prior to (/). Remarks pertaining to the entire flight are entered in the “Remarks” section of the original flight plan and are transmitted to all addressees.
    3. Separate stopover legs by inserting a slant (/) at the end of each leg except the last. Begin each leg on a new line.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KANDYFYX KGNVYFYX KMIAYFYX
    DTG KDCAYFYX
    IFR VV12345 P3 ADW CHS 1300/
    NIP 01+30 A5 BALL DP10 AP5 S/
    MIA 02+30 NO DE-ICING EQUIPMENT

    1. For composite flights, specify type flight plan as the first item of each leg.
    2. When en route delays are involved, include delay time in ETE.
    1. Apply military flight plan procedures to all civil aircraft landing at military bases.

    NOTE-

    It is the civil pilot's responsibility to obtain permission (from military authorities) to land at a military base.

    1. Apply civil flight plan procedure to civil aircraft departing military bases and en route to civil airports.
    1. 5-4-5. SUSPENDING FLIGHT NOTIFICATION MESSAGES
    1. Suspend the flight notification message or proposal message until acknowledgment is received from the addressee, then store in the history file.
    2. If an acknowledgment is not received within the following time period, use the telephone or interphone to assure delivery.
    1. Thirty minutes after departure if ETE is between 30 minutes and 2 hours.
    2. One hour before ETA if ETE is 2 hours or more.
    3. Thirty minutes after departure if remaining overnight (RON)/VIP information is contained in remarks of a military flight notification.
    1. When an acknowledgment for a message is required and has not been received in accordance with the procedure described above, retransmit the complete message to the addressee.
    2. Messages awaiting acknowledgment are suspended on the Suspense List. It contains a list of all numbered Service B messages and those messages transmitted from the flight plan mask not acknowledged by all the addressees.
    1. The message identification is the aircraft identification for flight notifications and/or the message number for all other message types.
    2. Acknowledgments received via NADIN will be automatically processed if they are in the proper format.
    3. Improperly formatted acknowledgments will be directed to a list for manual processing and will generate an alert at designated workstations for editing.
    4. The Suspense List will display the aircraft identification and message numbers in chronological order of transmission times and the addressees for each message with an indication of those that have not acknowledged.
    5. If a transmission has not been acknowledged by all addressees within 30 minutes, an alert will be generated by the operational system.
    6. Upon receipt of a Suspense alert, retransmit the message to addressees who have not acknowledged the message.
    7. When an acknowledgment message is received from any other source, such as interphone/telephone or facility guarding for the addressee, the specialist must manually acknowledge the message.
    1. 5-4-6. ACKNOWLEDGING FLIGHT NOTIFICATION MESSAGES

    Acknowledge a flight notification message or proposal as soon as practical after receipt. Prefix the acknowledgment with the letter “R” followed by a space and then the full aircraft identification.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KRCAYXYX
    DTG KRIUYFYX
    R DECAL01

    NOTE-

    The operational system will automatically acknowledge flight notification messages which are received in or have been edited into the correct format.

    1. 5-4-7. ACTION BY ADDRESSEES

    In addition to acknowledging receipt of flight notification, addressees must take the following actions:

    1. Military IFR flights.
    1. Notify BASOPS, if applicable, of the inbound flight.
    2. Upon request, deliver flight plan amendments to the ARTCC.
    3. File the flight notification message in the operational system history files or with the daily traffic.
    4. Forward the actual departure time to the destination tie-in facility for the next destination.
    1. Military VFR flights.
    1. Notify BASOPS, if applicable, of the inbound flight.
    2. Suspense the message, await closure/cancellation/departure and assume destination station responsibility.
    3. Forward the departure time to the destination tie-in facility and assume departure station responsibility.
    4. All flight notification messages are suspended on the Inbound List. An entry on the list will remain there until the flight plan is closed. Thirty minutes after the ETA, if the flight plan has not been closed, it is considered overdue and will generate an alert at designated workstations.
    1. If no information is received (for example, departure time, revised ETA) indicating that the flight is still active prior to the void time, close the flight plan and note this on the flight notification message and file.
    1. 5-4-8. MAJOR FLIGHT PLAN CHANGES FROM EN ROUTE AIRCRAFT
    1. Change of Destination.
    1. When a civil aircraft on a VFR flight plan or a military aircraft on any flight plan changes destination, obtain, as a minimum, the following information if not already known:
    1. Type of flight plan.
    2. Aircraft identification.
    3. Aircraft type.
    4. Departure point.
    5. Old destination.
    6. Present position.
    7. Altitude and route.
    8. New destination.
    9. Estimated time en route.
    1. Transmit a revised flight notification message to the departure, original, and new destination tie-in facilities containing the type of flight, aircraft identification, aircraft type, departure point, new destination, new ETA, and in Remarks, aircraft position and time, the words “ORIG DESTN” followed by the identifier of the original destination.

    EXAMPLE-

    VFR Change of Destination:
    FF KBOIYFYX KSEAYFYX
    DTG KCDCYFYX
    VFR N98789 C182/U PVU GEG 2230 $0VR SLC 1900
    ORIG DESTN BOI

    IFR Change of Destination:
    FF KRCAYXYX KTIKYXYX KRIUYFYX
    DTG KCDCYFYX
    IFR DECAL01 T43/R SMF TIK 0230 $AP3NP3S OVR
    SLC 2330 ORIG DESTN RCA

    1. Change from IFR to VFR. When a civil aircraft changes from an IFR to a VFR flight plan, obtain all flight plan information and send a flight notification message to the destination tie-in facility. Include the type of flight plan, aircraft identification and type, departure point, destination, ETA, and pertinent remarks.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KABQYFYX
    DTG KOAKYFYX
    VFR N87690 C182/U SFO ELP 2100 $CNLD
    IFR OVER BFL

    NOTE-

    Obtaining the name of the original flight plan source may provide additional information if the aircraft becomes overdue.

    1. Military Change from IFR to VFR or VFR to IFR. When a military aircraft changes from IFR to VFR, or VFR to IFR, or requests that other significant information be forwarded, transmit this information to the destination station.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KTIKYXYX
    DTG KDENYFYX
    DECAL01 CHGD TO VFR RON

    1. 5-4-9. CHANGE IN ETA

    When an aircraft wants to change its ETE, obtain a new ETA, and forward the information to the destination tie-in facility as a numbered message. The destination tie-in facility must acknowledge and, thereafter, use the new ETA as the standard for any necessary follow-up action; for example, QALQ message.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KENAYFYX
    DTG KSEAYFYX
    SEA001 ENA
    N34567 E2140

    REFERENCE-

    FAA Order 7210.3, Para. 14-1-3.c. Flight Plan Area

    1. 5-4-10. FLIGHT PLAN CLOSURE

    Do not transmit arrival reports except under unusual circumstances or in the following cases:

    1. Transmit arrival or other information involving FAA or Canadian MOT aircraft by a numbered message to any facility requested by the pilot.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KDCAYFYX
    DTG KHHRYFYX
    HHR002 DCA
    N2 A0839 (Remarks, as appropriate)

    1. For U.S. military aircraft, transmit arrival reports to the departure station only when:
    1. Requested by BASOPS.
    2. Special military flights arrive.
    1. When a pilot closes a flight plan with a station that has not received a flight notification message, obtain as a minimum, the departure point, the flight planned destination point, and the station with which the flight plan was filed.
    1. If the station receiving the closure is the tie-in station for the planned destination, transmit a numbered arrival message to the departure station with the remark “FPNO” and the departure point and destination identifiers. The departure station must relay the arrival information to the station holding the flight plan notification message in the active file.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KDCAYFYX
    DTG KMIVYFYX
    MIV001 DCA
    N8567 A1745 FPNO PHF NMK

    1. If the station receiving the closure message is not the destination tie-in station, transmit a numbered closure message to the destination tie-in station, including the aircraft identification, the closure time, the departure point, and destination. Remarks are optional.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KHUFYFYX
    DTG KDAYYFYX
    DAY003
    N11ND C1217 LOU IND LNDD CMH

    1. 5-4-11. MILITARY FLIGHTS TO/FROM U.S.
    1. To U.S. If “REQ ARR” is in remarks, suspend the flight plan until arrival information is received from BASOPS and forward to the departure location.
    2. From U.S. If requested by BASOPS, include “REQ ARR” in remarks section of ICAO flight plan. Terminate suspense action only after receipt of an arrival message and delivery to BASOPS.

    Section 5. Military Operations

    1. 5-5-1. SPECIAL MILITARY FLIGHTS
    1. Advise the ARTCC of flight notification messages, progress reports, changes en route, and related messages concerning Presidential or Vice Presidential flights.
    2. Alaska. In addition to the above, give advance notice to all RCCs along the route of flight. Telephone SARCC (907) 752-0227 or (907) 752-0128. Initiate communications search procedures if arrival is not received within 15 minutes after ETA, and immediately notify Alaskan NORAD Region Control Center (ANRCC).
    1. 5-5-2. MILITARY FOREIGN FLIGHTS

    Generally, all military foreign flights are required to clear through specified military bases. Pilots normally will not file flight plans directly with an FSS unless BASOPS is not available. BASOPS with no Service B access will forward an ICAO-type flight plan message via their tie-in FSS for relay through the Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications Network (AFTN). BASOPS should specify all addressees, both ATC and operational, in accordance with ICAO standards and military regulations.

    1. 5-5-3. USAF/USN UNDERGRADUATE PILOTS

    Aircraft piloted by solo USAF/USN undergraduate student pilots (who may occasionally request revised clearances), are normally restricted to flight in VFR conditions. The aircraft identification in the flight plan must include the letter “Z” as a suffix. Do not use this suffix in ground-to-air communication.

    NOTE-

    USAF/USN solo students who have passed an instrument certification check may penetrate cloud layers in climb or descent only. Requests for revised clearances to avoid clouds in level flight can still be expected. This does not change the requirement to use the letter “Z” as a suffix to the aircraft identification.

    1. 5-5-4. MESSAGE HANDLING

    Accept and forward messages from any military authority that concern aircraft movement, national defense, safety of flight, or emergencies. This includes, but is not limited, to the following:

    1. Flight Advisory Messages.
    1. The FSS originating the advisory or receiving it from the originating BASOPS must determine the FSS nearest the aircraft's estimated position for VFR flights, or the appropriate ARTCC for IFR flights. Transmit a numbered message only to the facility identified. Include in the text “FLT ADVY,” aircraft identification and type, and route of flight, in that order. The last item must be the identifier of the originating BASOPS or FSS. Plain language may be used.

    EXAMPLE-

    FF KZIDZRZX
    DTG KCOUYFYX
    COU005 ZID
    FLT ADVY A12345 T38 GVW J80 DAY
    DAY WX BLO LNDG MIN. SUG PROCD CVG. ADZ INTENTIONS DLVR 1625
    GVW BASOPS

    1. Inform the originator if unable to deliver the flight advisory within 15 minutes. Store the message in the history files.
    1. Electronic Counter Measure (ECM) Alerts. Transmit a numbered message via Service B to tie-in stations serving the addressees. If acknowledgements are not received within 1 hour, deliver via telephone.
    2. REACH and SAM Flight Messages. Forward to the airlift command post specified by the pilot if message contains request “Pass to Air Mobility Command & Airlift Command Post (AMC ACP),” specified by the pilot.

    Section 6. IFR/DVFR ADIZ Flight Plans

    1. 5-6-1. AIRCRAFT MOVEMENT INFORMATION SERVICES (AMIS) WITHIN AN ADIZ-IFR

    In addition to the normal handling of aircraft operating in accordance with IFR, ADIZ penetration information or position reports on IFR operations outside of controlled airspace must be forwarded immediately to the appropriate ARTCC.

    1. 5-6-2. AMIS WITHIN AN ADIZ-DVFR

    For security control of air traffic, specific information contained in flight plans filed by a pilot operating or proposing to operate in accordance with DVFR within an ADIZ must be forwarded to NORAD.

    NOTE-

    Other offices, military and civil, as well as pilots, may file DVFR flight plans for civil aircraft with a FSS for forwarding to NORAD.

    1. 5-6-3. FORWARDING DVFR INFORMATION
    1. Forward DVFR flight plan information to NORAD via the Service B NORAD address or by telephone.

    NOTE-

    1. The following NORAD addresses are group addresses that include all appropriate NORAD sectors and law enforcement:
      KZAMZQZX - the contiguous 48 states and San Juan.
      PHIRAOCZ - Hawaii
      PAEDYYYX - Alaska
    2. NORAD will not send an acknowledgement and must be manually acknowledged from the suspense list by the specialist. (NORAD Headquarters assumes responsibility for receipt.)
    1. DVFR flight plans must be entered into the operational system for processing in accordance with system instructions and include the following information:
    1. Aircraft call sign.
    2. Number and type of aircraft.
    3. Altitude (within ADIZ).
    4. True airspeed.
    5. Time of departure.
    1. When the flight plan information is provided before the aircraft's departure, enter as a proposal. Depart the flight plan immediately upon receipt of the actual departure time.
    2. If arrangements cannot be made to obtain the actual departure time, forward the ETD.
    1. Point of departure.
    2. ETA.
    3. Destination.
    4. Remarks.
    1. DVFR discrete transponder code.
    2. True airspeed.
    3. Estimated point of penetration of the ADIZ (latitude/longitude or fix-radial-distance), except in Alaska.
    4. Estimated time of penetration of the ADIZ, except in Alaska.
    5. If no arrival report (NORIV) will be filed with an appropriate aeronautical facility, include the contraction “NORIV” as a non-transmitted remark. Do not pass “NORIV” to NORAD.

    EXAMPLE-

    1210 135 3442/09345 1446

    NOTE-

    On a proposed flight plan, a single “X” may replace the DVFR discrete transponder code, true airspeed, estimated point of penetration of the ADIZ, or the estimated time of penetration of the ADIZ.

    EXAMPLE-

    Missing true airspeed:
    1210 X 3442/09345 1446

    Missing estimated point of ADIZ penetration and time: 1210 135 XX

    1. Forward DVFR flight plan information for aircraft operating into Canada using the same procedures in paragraph 5-6-3b, except add “DVFR” in remarks and transmit the information to the appropriate Canadian transborder tie-in facility.
    1. 5-6-4. STOPOVER DVFR FLIGHT PLANS

    Accept stopover DVFR flight plans filed on those aircraft planning one or more landings (within an ADIZ) en route to the destination, provided the information in paragraph 5-6-3 is furnished for each segment of flight. Remind the pilot that 14 CFR Part 99 requires departure times to be made good and that a written record should be retained of these times at each departure point.

    Section 7. Non-Emergency Parachute Jumping

    1. 5-7-1. COORDINATION

    All pertinent information received from pilots prior to and during parachute jumping activity must be forwarded to other affected ATC facilities.

    1. 5-7-2. PRE-JUMP RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
    1. When a pre-jump radio call required by 14 CFR Section 105.13 is received, contact the ARTCC sector or terminal facility in whose airspace the jump begins. If the controller has pertinent traffic, advise the jump aircraft to contact the control facility on the appropriate frequency for traffic information.
    2. If the aircraft is unable to contact the control facility direct, obtain traffic information and relay it to the aircraft.

    EXAMPLE-

    “Cessna Four Zero Yankee, A-T-C advises traffic, Cessna Four Twenty-One passing SPUTS intersection eastbound on Victor One Fifty-Seven at seven thousand.”