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Boeing 737 MAX Reading Room

In accordance with the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has created this webpage to make the following categories of documents related to the Boeing 737 MAX available to the public, subject to any applicable FOIA exemptions:

  • Documents requested by members of the public under FOIA related to the Boeing 737 MAX that the FAA has determined are likely to become a subject of subsequent requests for substantially the same records, or that have been requested three or more times; and
  • Records related to the Boeing 737 MAX that have yet to be requested pursuant to FOIA, but that the FAA has determined are nonetheless of sufficient public interest to warrant automatic disclosure to the public.

Most documents are in PDF format and will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view or print them.


Airworthiness Directive Summary

To address the unsafe conditions that led to the grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX, the FAA issued an Airworthiness Directive that requires four design changes:

  • Installing new flight control computer software.
    • This change is intended to prevent erroneous MCAS activation, among other safeguards.
  • Installing updated cockpit display system software to generate an AOA disagree alert.
    • This will alert the pilots that the airplane's two AOA sensors are disagreeing by a certain amount indicating a potential AOA sensor failure.
  • Incorporating new and revised operating procedures into the Airplane Flight Manual.
    • This change is intended to ensure the flight crew has the means to recognize and respond to erroneous stabilizer movement and the effects of a potential AOA sensor failure.
  • Changing the routing of horizontal stabilizer trim wires.
    • This is intended to bring the airplane into full compliance with the FAA's wire-separation safety standards.
  • In addition to these four design changes, the FAA also will require operators to conduct an AOA sensor system test and perform an operational readiness flight prior to returning each airplane to service.

Related Documents


Grounding Order – Emergency Order of Prohibition

Testimony

  • March 27, 2019 – Statement of Daniel K. Elwell, Acting Administrator Before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation, Subcommittee on Aviation and Space on the State of Airline Safety: Federal Oversight of Commercial Aviation
  • September 25, 2019 – Statement of Daniel K. Elwell, Deputy Administrator Before the Committee on Appropriations; Subcommittee on Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies; Oversight Hearing on FAA Aviation Certification
  • June 17, 2020 – Statement of Stephen M. Dickson, Administrator Before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate on Examining the Federal Aviation Administration's Oversight of Aircraft Certification

Speeches

  • September 23, 2019 – Boeing 737 MAX Status Meeting with Aviation Regulators in Montreal: Stephen M. Dickson, Montreal Canada
  • December 11, 2019 – The Boeing 737 Max: Examining the FAA's Oversight of the Aircraft's Certification: Stephen M. Dickson Before the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, United States House of Representatives

Press Releases

  • March 6, 2020 – FAA Proposes $19.68 Million Civil Penalty Against The Boeing Co.
  • January 10, 2020 – FAA Proposes $5.4 Million Civil Penalty Against The Boeing Co.

FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX

Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR)

Flight Standardization Board Reports

Boeing 737 MAX

FAA Safety Hotline Complaints

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This page was originally published at: https://www.faa.gov/foia/electronic_reading_room/boeing_reading_room/